Eastman 5363 Positive Film II

Eastman 5363 Positive Film II

Back in December I was approached by Michael Raso of the Film Photography Project if I wanted to help test a new (to the FPP) film stock. Just before Christmas the film arrived with a little note saying “ASA-6, we think” there was no real indication online how to develop this film in traditional B&W chemistry or it’s exact sensitivity. Google yielded a document by Eastman Kodak on this film stock, Eastman 5363 Positive Film II was a high contrast motion picture film designed for the creation of both positive and negative titles for films. And to develop using Kodak’s D-97 chemistry. Last time I checked I couldn’t just walk into my usual camera shop, Burlington Camera and get D-97. So I had to go with my gut, what other high-contrast film had I used from Kodak’s Motion picture line. The first thing that came into my head was the John Meadow’s found SO-331!

The first roll I shot in High Park in Toronto at ASA-50 (I meant to shoot it at ASA-25) I really wasn’t convinced at the ASA-6 rating and I really didn’t want to have to lug a tripod around that day. Plus I figured as a motion picture film it would have a pretty wide latitude. Besides I still had two other rolls to shoot so why not? After shooting it I got it home and developed it in Kodak Xtol, Stock Solution for 5 minutes (per times for SO-331 at ASA-50), constant agitation for the first minute, then 10 seconds for each following minute. Water stop with constant agitation for a full minute. Then Kodafix Rapid Fixer with Hardener for five minutes following the same agitation pattern as with developing. Then two minutes in Kodak Hypoclear, then washed using the Ilford wash method, straight water for the first three cycles, then Photoflo introduced for the final cycle. The results very very contrasty image, pure B&W very little in the way of midtones but rather unique all the same.

Eastman 5363 Test - Roll 1 - High Park

Eastman 5363 Test - Roll 1 - High Park

Eastman 5363 Test - Roll 1 - High Park

The second roll I shot in downtown Stratford at ASA-25. But this time I went with a forumula developed by friend and fellow FPP Volunteer and all around awesome lady Leslie from Imagine That! and the Mecca. HC-110 Dilution G (1+29 from the stock solution) for 22 minutes. Constant agitation for the first minute, then 10 seconds for each following minute. Water stop with constant agitation for a full minute. Then Kodafix Rapid Fixer with Hardener for five minutes following the same agitation pattern as with developing. Then two minutes in Kodak Hypoclear, then washed using the Ilford wash method, straight water for the first three cycles, then Photoflo introduced for the final cycle. Much cleaner results, and a very metallic chrome feel to the image. Still High Contrast but with more mid-tones.

Eastman 5363 Test - Roll 2

Eastman 5363 Test - Roll 2

Eastman 5363 Test - Roll 2

The third roll was also shot in Stratford, and since I still had lots of sun I decided to knock it down one more stop to ASA-12. Developing this time I took a huge step and went a bit crazy, stand developing. I used Blazinal (the locally available Rodinal blend) at 1+100, and stand developed for one hour. Constant agitation for the first minute, then two inversions every 15 minutes. Water stop with constant agitation for a full minute. Then Kodafix Rapid Fixer with Hardener for five minutes following the same agitation pattern as with developing. Then two minutes in Kodak Hypoclear, then washed using the Ilford wash method, straight water for the first three cycles, then Photoflo introduced for the final cycle. The results…failure. Everything was way over exposed that I didn’t even bother scanning it in. But when it comes to testing a new film stock failures are bound to happen, and that means that the other testers can work from there to make it better.

This film does work at ASA-6 as well, Michael Raso has had great luck with D-76 at 1+1 for 12 minutes. Over all I rather like this film, it’s a great slow speed film and has a lot of potential for unique landscapes and crazy portraiture. If you want to try this film out you can pick up rolls at the FPP store! Have other ideas on how it could be processed, please feel free to contact me by email, or you can contact the FPP directly.

High Park Photos: Contax G2 – Carl Zeiss Planar 2/45 T*
Stratford Photos: Contax G2 – Carl Zeiss Biogon 2,8/28 T*

4 Replies to “Eastman 5363 Positive Film II”

  1. way back when, Kodak made a wonderful photo microscopy film called SO-410.If memory serves me correctly I used a vitamin C based (sodium ascorbate) developer else I got results like u got with teh Xtol…. You might try one of those, they have some really interesting characteristics, like high accutance.|
    Nice article, thanks

    1. Thanks! I chose Xtol first because it worked really well with SO-331, which is probably something similar to SO-410, both being special order films!

  2. I love this stuff too. I believe it’s still in production, for the time being, at least. I’ve used it in 16mm (sold as Eastman 7363) to shoot silent movies, rating it at ISO/ASA 10, then developing it as BW reversal. It gives a wonderful authentic orthochromatic look.
    Greets

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