One thing that I enjoyed about the Sheet film version of this film (When it was called Ilford Ortho Copy Plus) is that some developer/time combinations had no film speed listed so in some cases I shot the stuff as low as ASA-6. So here I decided to test the roll film in the same way. And you know what? It worked! I selected five scenes and shot every scene three times, at ASA-25 (left), ASA-12 (middle), and ASA-6 (right) and processed them all D-76 (1+1).

Ilford Ortho Plus - Low Speed Testing
In this first scene you can see a clear difference between each frame.
Mamiya m645 – Mamiya-Sekor C 1:2.8 f=80mm – Ilford Ortho Plus @ ASA-25, 12, and 6 – Kodak D-76 (1+1) 10:30 @ 20C
Ilford Ortho Plus - Low Speed Testing
While more subtle you can still see a clear difference between each frame.
Mamiya m645 – Mamiya-Sekor C 1:2.8 f=80mm – Ilford Ortho Plus @ ASA-25, 12, and 6 – Kodak D-76 (1+1) 10:30 @ 20C
Ilford Ortho Plus - Low Speed Testing
Again there are differences but subtle again, these are my personal favourites.
Mamiya m645 – Mamiya-Sekor C 1:2.8 f=80mm – Ilford Ortho Plus @ ASA-25, 12, and 6 – Kodak D-76 (1+1) 10:30 @ 20C
Ilford Ortho Plus - Low Speed Testing
Very little difference between each of the frames in this scene.
Mamiya m645 – Mamiya-Sekor C 1:2.8 f=80mm – Ilford Ortho Plus @ ASA-25, 12, and 6 – Kodak D-76 (1+1) 10:30 @ 20C

How did I go about making these frames? I used my Pentax Spotmeter V, in a couple of the scenes, the first and third I averaged the metering. I took a reading of the brightest highlight and the deepest shadow and picked the EV value between them. The second and fourth scene, I metered the darkest shadow I wanted the most detail in then underexposed by a stop. After processing the film and pulling it from the tank, I was a little concerned, the negatives were dense, but there was plenty of detail. I went back and compared the results to the negs I had in 4×5 format and saw the same results. I didn’t worry too much as when I scanned them and ran them through Photoshop. I had some real treats. As you can see with my results, there’s lots of shadow detail and even some highlight detail, although not as much. Does the trick still work, I would say yes, it gives you yet another way to play with this lovely film stock from Ilford!

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