Author: Alex

Return of the Original – Polaroid Week 2017

Return of the Original – Polaroid Week 2017

Polaroid is dead, long live Polaroid

A rather morbid way to start this whole celebration of Instant Photography. Polaroid week and I are a bit hit and miss. And yet I’ve managed to join in on it several times. But this year I thought that it would be at an end for me. See, I had ditched all my instant photography gear between the end of last year’s Polaroid Week and the early spring of this year. And as the quote says, I tried to get out, but they just pulled me back in.

Polaroid Week - Fall 2017

Polaroid Week - Fall 2017

I guess you can say at the last recording session for the 2017 season of Classic Camera Revival; co-host James Lee had a Polaroid Spectra with the latest batch of Impossible Project Black & White film. Well, that was that I had to get back in after seeing the quality of the newest batch. And I had just received as a gift, a Polaroid One from a friend, Marcia Cook. What made the Polaroid One different from all other 600-Type Polaroids is that it had a manufacture date of 2001, one of the last cameras to be produced by Polaroid.

Polaroid Week - Fall 2017

Polaroid Week - Fall 2017

It’s always a gamble with Polaroid Cameras, but I invested in a couple of packs of film, and bam, it worked. Beautifully! The black & white film, stunning, and the colour stock held that typical charm I had come to expect from instant film. And then the big news hit, and man, what news! The Impossible Project was no more; they were now Polaroid Originals. Yes, the original is back!

SCAET

Toys

Polaroid has always been attached to “Instant” photography at least more me. I’m sure more people these days attach it to Fuji Instax. I went on a hunt, eventually getting some film packs from Henry’s in Oakville and Hamilton and then I saved them up for Polaroid Week. And all I can say is I’m impressed the colour is spot on, gone is the faded yellow I had come to expect from Impossible. And then there’s the black & white, I already am impressed with the stock, and under the new name, it’s even better! Which I never thought possible. Of course, this might all be a placebo effect, even if it is, I’m good with it.

Building On Up

Burlington Camera

For us in Canada, the price remains at thirty dollars a pack for eight shots so not exactly something I’ll be shooting on a regular basis. However, for something special, I think it’ll be worth the money.

#photochat – 19 October 2017 – Collaboration

#photochat – 19 October 2017 – Collaboration

Established in 2013 by MainStreetHost and taken on by Alex Luyckx Photography in 2015, #photochat is a community of photography professionals and enthusiasts who congregate to talk shop and discuss anything and everything photography. To participate in our weekly chat (every Thursday at 1:00pm ET) search the #photochat hashtag to see the conversation, or find me at @AlexLuyckxPhoto on Twitter for more info. Be sure to include the hashtag in your tweets to answer the questions and talk with the other participants.

If there’s a topic you’d like to see covered in #photochat, hop onto Facebook, Twitter, or good old fashioned Email and let me know!

The Topic for Thursday 19 October 2017 is about Collaboration!

Question 1 – Have you ever collaborated with another photographer?
Question 2 – Have you collaborated with a manufacturer as an Ambassador?
Question 2b – What was your experiences as an ambassador or would you consider being one?
Question 3 – Would you consider collaborating with photographers on a project?
Question 4 – Do you feel you would work well in a collaboration, or would you hate everything?
Question 5 – If you could collaborate with any photographer, who would it be?

Past topics have included: Buying Work, Silly Mistakes, Show and Tell, The Discomfort Zone, The Comfort Zone, Influence, Consistency, Inclement Weather, Stock Photography, Going Freelance, Photo Sharing, Photography Books, Creativity in Photography, Colour Photography, Black & White (2017), Critiques, Lenses, Blogging, Regrets, What’s in Your Bag (2017), Promotion, Random Questions, Photo Projects, Shooting Film, Photographic Buzz Words, Photographic Wins, Photographic Fails, Still Life, Portrait Photography, Automotive Photography (2017), Traveling With Gear, Photographic Quirks, Why is Photography Important (2017), Ethics (2017), Difficult Situations, Phone Photography, Web sites, Self-Improvement (2017), Personal Branding, Photographic Gifts, Brand Loyalties (2016), Location Scouting, Food Photography, The Good, The Bad, Photographic Slumps, Wedding Photography, Post-Processing, Digital Photography, Film Photography, Keeping It Simple, Photographic Fads, Regular Maintenance, Personal Vision, Travel, Snapshots, Extreme Weather, Sports Photography, Pet Peeves, Out of the Box, Portrait Photography, Infrared Photography, Good Practices, Landscape Photography, Photography as a Skill, Photography as an Art, Getting Noticed, Post-Processing, Film Processing, Instant Photography, Tripods, Pet Photography, Budget Photography, Nude Photography, Workflow, Vintage Gear, The 5 W’s, Going Pro, Importance of Photography, Filters, Photography & the Law, Editing Your Work, Travelling with Gear, Street Photography, Get Up and Go (Motivation), Photographic Goals (2016), Low-Light Photography, Photographic Dreams, Cold Weather, Naturally Artificial, LoFi Love, Product Photography, Chasing Light, Automotive Photography, Finding Inspiration, All About You, Landscapes, Shooting for Colour, Digital Video, Back to School Parts I and II, Self-Publishing, Keeping Calm, Photography & Zen, Camera Bags, Dealing with People, Printing Your Work, Adventure Photography, Camera Clubs, Fireworks Photography, Aircraft Photography, Architectural Photography, Photo meetups, Getting Rid of GAS, Keeping it Organized, Favourite Things, Photo Competitions, Biggest Challenges, Compact System Cameras, film vs. digital, landscape photography, seasonal photography, the basics of composition, what’s in your camera bag?, night photography, portrait photography, forced perspective photography, black and white photography, golden hour photography, macro photography, how photography has changed your life, to photoshop or not, motion photography, photojournalism, the best gifts for photographers in 2014, extreme weather photography, photographic aspirations, street photography, “why are you a photographer?”, improvisational lighting tactics, post-processing rituals, photographic blunders, getting paid, photographic triumphs, shooting hardship, photographic anxieties, quick thinking, making a difference, favorites, appropriation, brand loyalties, small photography, BIG photography, focus, photography in advertising, battle scars, sharing your photography, creative evolution, the inanimate subject, photo vs. video, emerging tech, teaching the craft, getting the shot, traveling with your camera, sweet gear deals, mobile lighting solutions, quelling frustrations, finding work, sensitive subjects, DIY projects, defamation, making and maintaining a website, in defense of photography, capturing action, post-processing, photo lingo, cold weather shooting, food photography, death in photography, film photography, famous photos, critiques, videography, user-generated content, composition, iPhoneography, standing up for yourself, blogging, workflow, the first time, candid portraiture, copyright and licensing, ethics, gear investments, inspiration, long shots, making it in the photo business, networking, night photography, perks of being a photographer, photographer stressors, photography philosophy, photography trends, picking your priorities, pricing, promoting yourself and your work, protecting your assets, self-improvement, odd photography, and travel.

CCR Review 72 – Pentax 67II

CCR Review 72 – Pentax 67II

When in the past I’ve shot 6×7 cameras I’ve found them clunky and unwieldy. Think back to the Mamiya Universal and RB67. Even the Bronica GS-1 which is better than most. None of these cameras had the style and handling of the Pentax 67II. Now the 67II fixes what I would see as problems with the 6×7 and 67. This camera is a traditional 35mm SLR on steroids and worthy of the description. There are some cameras that I have an instant enjoyment of, and this camera certainly ranks among those. Thanks to James Lee for loaning out this beauty.

CCR Review 72 - Pentax 67II
The Dirt

  • Make: Pentax
  • Model: 67II
  • Type: Single Lens Reflex
  • Format: Medium (120/220), 6×7
  • Lens: Interchangeable, Pentax K67 Mount
  • Year of Manufacture: 1998

CCR Review 72 - Pentax 67II

CCR Review 72 - Pentax 67II

The Good
If you’re used to operating a traditional 35mm SLR of the more modern ilk, think Nikon F4, then stepping up to the Pentax 67II is easy. Everything is where you think it will be. Shutter speed control, EV adjustment, shutter release, even the film advance. As for handling the weight of the camera is no big deal for me, it’s well balanced even with the heavier lens on the front. The beefy side grip with the shutter release is perfect. Everything on this camera is manual, no menus to hunt through, everything is connected to a knob or dial. And then there’s the meter, I would pit the thing against the meter in my F5 with spot metering, centre-weighted, and matrix metering I don’t think there’s anything that could trick the cameras exposure system. And the optics available for the system are brilliant, and even if you get a 67II, all the original glass will work perfectly as the 67II remains a manual focus camera. So you have access to Super-Takumar, Super-Multi-Coated Takumar and SMC Takumar glass all work and are tack sharp. Now let’s talk negative size, while I’m a fan of 6×6 there are certain applications that the 6×7 negative applies itself to better. It’s the same image ratio as 4×5 (Large Format) making it ideal for print in magazines and even in the darkroom and inkjet printing. It’s big and beautiful.

CCR Review 72 - Pentax 67II

CCR Review 72 - Pentax 67II

The Bad
While the 67II is near perfect, there are still a couple of little things that can be annoying. Despite the ease of use, loading the film can be a bit tricky, having to unlock and pull down the two locking lugs for the film spools. It does slow it down, and when you only get ten shots per roll, you need a good 2-3 minutes for a proper reload. And with the lack of newly manufactured 220 film, which would yield 20 shots per roll you have to time yourself when at a job working with the camera. The second thing, which is a minor annoyance is the continuation of allowing people to mount the large wooden grip on the camera. This throwback to the original 6×7 and 67 isn’t a requirement on the 67II since it’s on the opposite side and the camera has a decent grip already. It also throws off the strap mount which when you hang the camera around your neck the lugs are on the one side only so when you pull the camera up to shoot; you twist it sort of. Just makes it a little bit awkward.

CCR Review 72 - Pentax 67II

CCR Review 72 - Pentax 67II

The Lowdown
I’m glad I only shot one roll through the 67II not because I hated the camera but because I took to it right off the bat. And if I had shot more there would be a strong chance I’d be hunting one down. Now, these cameras are rare on the used market, and while I’d jump on a 67, again the system is not a cheap one. But worth the money. And if I hadn’t invested in Hasselblad I’d go for one of these in a heartbeat. But these systems aren’t for the faint-hearted. They’re heavy, bulky, and designed for professional work. But they’re designed for being out in the field. But if none of these things scare you, the 67II will not let you down.

All Photos Taken in Elora, Ontario
Pentax 67II – Super-Multi-Coated Takumar/6×7 1:3.5/55 – Ilford HP5+ @ ASA-400
Kodak D-23 (Stock) 7:30 @ 20C

Delta Def Jam – Part II

Delta Def Jam – Part II

When it comes to the Delta line of films from Ilford, my least favourite is Delta 400; I don’t know why. I just never got the results I honestly liked out of it. So with Delta Def Jam in full swing, I figured why not give it another go!

The New Post Office

The Old Post Office

Downtown Cambridge, or rather the historical name for this part of the city, Galt has always been on my radar as a place to take a camera and have some fun. While I have tried in the past to do some shooting here, the camera I had with me just didn’t behave. I grabbed my Rolleiflex, two rolls of Delta 400 and hit the road. I also had along my Nikon F90 loaded with Kodak Ektachrome E100G along with three final sheets of RPX25 for my Crown Graphic.

Great Little Pub

A Bit of a Mess

However, I miscalculated just a bit, and the sun didn’t start to show up until after I had left the city and well into developing the film I shot. But a 400-Speed film provided me with enough reach speed wise, and I just made sure to shoot flat compositions or put the f/2.8 lens to use. One of the more exciting interactions I had was when I went into a church in search of a washroom. One of the gentlemen running their pie table asked if I had a Hasselblad. I replied that it was a Rolleiflex, and I had left the Hasselblad at home. As it turned out, he is a fan of the Film Photography Podcast.

Basic + Person

Centering

While I had plans to develop the film in Pyrocat-HD, but I’ll save that until next month. I decided to try another one of my magic bullets, Kodak D-23. And I am pretty happy with the results. Maybe I just don’t like Ilford DD-X. I’ll see you next month for the final Delta Def Jam. Until then keep Jamming folks!

All Photos Taken In Cambridge, Ontario, Canada
Rolleiflex 2.8F – Carl Zeiss Planar 80mm 1:2.8 (Yellow-12) – Ilford Delta 400 @ ASA-400
Kodak D-23 (Stock) 7:00 @ 20C

#photochat – 12 October 2017 – Buying Work

#photochat – 12 October 2017 – Buying Work

Established in 2013 by MainStreetHost and taken on by Alex Luyckx Photography in 2015, #photochat is a community of photography professionals and enthusiasts who congregate to talk shop and discuss anything and everything photography. To participate in our weekly chat (every Thursday at 1:00pm ET) search the #photochat hashtag to see the conversation, or find me at @AlexLuyckxPhoto on Twitter for more info. Be sure to include the hashtag in your tweets to answer the questions and talk with the other participants.

If there’s a topic you’d like to see covered in #photochat, hop onto Facebook, Twitter, or good old fashioned Email and let me know!

The Topic for Thursday 12 October 2017 is about Buying Work!

Question 1 – Have you ever purchased someone’s photography?
Question 2 – Have you ever purchased a known photographer’s work (think Ansal Adams)?
Question 3 – What do you look for in buying a photographic print?
Question 4 – What price range do you work in when buying work?
Question 5 – If you could own any famous photograph, what photo would you buy?

Past topics have included: Silly Mistakes, Show and Tell, The Discomfort Zone, The Comfort Zone, Influence, Consistency, Inclement Weather, Stock Photography, Going Freelance, Photo Sharing, Photography Books, Creativity in Photography, Colour Photography, Black & White (2017), Critiques, Lenses, Blogging, Regrets, What’s in Your Bag (2017), Promotion, Random Questions, Photo Projects, Shooting Film, Photographic Buzz Words, Photographic Wins, Photographic Fails, Still Life, Portrait Photography, Automotive Photography (2017), Traveling With Gear, Photographic Quirks, Why is Photography Important (2017), Ethics (2017), Difficult Situations, Phone Photography, Web sites, Self-Improvement (2017), Personal Branding, Photographic Gifts, Brand Loyalties (2016), Location Scouting, Food Photography, The Good, The Bad, Photographic Slumps, Wedding Photography, Post-Processing, Digital Photography, Film Photography, Keeping It Simple, Photographic Fads, Regular Maintenance, Personal Vision, Travel, Snapshots, Extreme Weather, Sports Photography, Pet Peeves, Out of the Box, Portrait Photography, Infrared Photography, Good Practices, Landscape Photography, Photography as a Skill, Photography as an Art, Getting Noticed, Post-Processing, Film Processing, Instant Photography, Tripods, Pet Photography, Budget Photography, Nude Photography, Workflow, Vintage Gear, The 5 W’s, Going Pro, Importance of Photography, Filters, Photography & the Law, Editing Your Work, Travelling with Gear, Street Photography, Get Up and Go (Motivation), Photographic Goals (2016), Low-Light Photography, Photographic Dreams, Cold Weather, Naturally Artificial, LoFi Love, Product Photography, Chasing Light, Automotive Photography, Finding Inspiration, All About You, Landscapes, Shooting for Colour, Digital Video, Back to School Parts I and II, Self-Publishing, Keeping Calm, Photography & Zen, Camera Bags, Dealing with People, Printing Your Work, Adventure Photography, Camera Clubs, Fireworks Photography, Aircraft Photography, Architectural Photography, Photo meetups, Getting Rid of GAS, Keeping it Organized, Favourite Things, Photo Competitions, Biggest Challenges, Compact System Cameras, film vs. digital, landscape photography, seasonal photography, the basics of composition, what’s in your camera bag?, night photography, portrait photography, forced perspective photography, black and white photography, golden hour photography, macro photography, how photography has changed your life, to photoshop or not, motion photography, photojournalism, the best gifts for photographers in 2014, extreme weather photography, photographic aspirations, street photography, “why are you a photographer?”, improvisational lighting tactics, post-processing rituals, photographic blunders, getting paid, photographic triumphs, shooting hardship, photographic anxieties, quick thinking, making a difference, favorites, appropriation, brand loyalties, small photography, BIG photography, focus, photography in advertising, battle scars, sharing your photography, creative evolution, the inanimate subject, photo vs. video, emerging tech, teaching the craft, getting the shot, traveling with your camera, sweet gear deals, mobile lighting solutions, quelling frustrations, finding work, sensitive subjects, DIY projects, defamation, making and maintaining a website, in defense of photography, capturing action, post-processing, photo lingo, cold weather shooting, food photography, death in photography, film photography, famous photos, critiques, videography, user-generated content, composition, iPhoneography, standing up for yourself, blogging, workflow, the first time, candid portraiture, copyright and licensing, ethics, gear investments, inspiration, long shots, making it in the photo business, networking, night photography, perks of being a photographer, photographer stressors, photography philosophy, photography trends, picking your priorities, pricing, promoting yourself and your work, protecting your assets, self-improvement, odd photography, and travel.

That Film Camera Won’t Make You a Better Photographer

That Film Camera Won’t Make You a Better Photographer

That old film camera sitting up in your father’s closet, or in your grandfather’s dresser won’t make you a better photographer. It’s like a gas range won’t make you a better chef or a fountain pen improving your handwriting. These are things; a thing cannot make you better than you already are. In fact, they might even exacerbate the mistakes you make. Sure, using these might help you eventually, but there’s only one thing that will make you a better photographer, yourself.

400TX:365 - Week 52 - All's Quiet on Christmas Day

I’ve seen of late and even posted articles about these photographers who laud the film camera and how by only picking it up makes them a better photographer. As someone who started off my journey in photography with a film camera, I can tell you, a film camera does not make you a better photographer. I started off with a fixed lens rangefinder, a great camera for a beginner. And you know I got to know that camera rather well, and by the last time I shot the camera before passing it off to a new owner, I was producing good images with it. But it wasn’t the camera that made me a better photographer.

CCR - Review 8 - Minolta Hi-Matic 7s

CCR - Review 8 - Minolta Hi-Matic 7s

About a year (or so I can’t remember) I picked up my first SLR, and it was all move over Ansel Adams. And in my first roll shot through the SRT-102 I got a single, good image. And looking back, even that image wasn’t that good. But if you think about it even the greats that we all laud today started off with a huge trash bin of failure. So if you think that film camera will make you a better photographer by simply shooting with it, repeat after me, no single piece of equipment will make you better. And that counts for everything. So I did what I should have done much earlier. I put down the camera, and I picked up a book, and I learned, and I practised. When I started shooting with a DSLR with flash my first photos were terrible, there were shadows; everything was in focus rather than isolating my subject. But at the time (2007) I didn’t know any of it. I would just shoot and hope the pray. A year later I had figured out how to defuse my flash, use a short telephoto, and use a shallow depth of field. And buying the flash diffuser and the 85mm lens didn’t make it automatic. I had to learn it first and practice it second.

Spoon

Mis

As I said a camera is a tool. An SLR won’t make you instantly learn composition, that 10,000$ Leica won’t make you a top-notch street shooter. Now don’t get me wrong these are fantastic tools to help you along the way but you need to still put them down every so often and pick up a book or read an article on something then put it into practice. Because even with the best camera in the world you can still create a bad photograph. There has only once where better gear helped me, but more important was knowing how to compose the image to better show off the scale of the abandoned power plant R.L. Hearn. Originally I used a Minolta SuperZoom camera, while the second time I shot the same scene I had an ultrawide angle lens on an SLR.

Look Up

i remember you

So by all means, put down your digital camera and pick up that dusty old manual mechanical camera. But please don’t wax poetic and delude yourself into thinking it will make you a better photographer just because of what it is. Because if you don’t make yourself a better one through practice, learning, and failure. Your photos will still suck even with a film camera, and your wallet may hurt more because of it. Shoot film because you want to, not because you feel it will make you better. It won’t, only one thing will make you better. You.

Five Rolls – A Journey of HP5+

Five Rolls – A Journey of HP5+

If you’ve ever listened to me talk about film, you’ll know there are some films I have a strong view. I love my Kodak Tri-X and JCH Streetpan 400; then there are the ones I’m not too happy with, that is Ilford HP5+ in 35mm and Delta 400 in general. But what if I could change my mind on just one? Would it give me another tool in the kit to use to get a specific look? Could I shoot four rolls of a film stock and come to like it, even go as far as recommending it? Challenge Accepted.

That film isn’t Delta 400, I don’t think I’ll ever grow to like the stock actually I just developed Delta 400 in Kodak D-23 and it turns out it’s not a bad film stock either, but I feel HP5+ can be one that I just might be able to. So I’ll give it a shot, get five rolls of the stock, load it up into trusted cameras, visit suitable locations, and then pick developers I’ve never used with 35mm HP5+ and go to town.

Roll One: SPUR HRX
I got the idea of using SPUR HRX after looking on Flickr after Tony posted a question on the Toronto Film Shooters Group. Tony had asked for developer recommendations for HP5+ and Mike suggested SPUR HRX. To be fair in this case, I also pushed the film a little bit more than an average day of shooting. I shot the roll indoors in a sort of abandoned, or rather closed campus of Sheridan College. I figured, if I’m going to learn to like the film, I might as well take it into a familiar situation for me.

Registrar

Bravo Six

Leftovers

The Moody Darkness

The results they speak for themselves, the images are dark, moody, and the contrast is rich. Not surprising given the lighting conditions. I did note that there a more substantial grain pattern, but using a sharp developer on a 400-speed film will do that, but it isn’t anything worth complaining.

Roll Two: Pyrocat-HD
When in doubt just run with a Pyro developer. I started working with Pyro based developers after seeing some of the amazing work Mat Marrash has been doing with HP5+ in 8×10 and this developer. Having some early morning light in Toronto, I loaded up the roll into my trusty Contax G2 and went to town!

Toronto - September 2017

Toronto - September 2017

Toronto - September 2017

Toronto - September 2017

When I pulled the negatives out of the tank, I noticed something different, something I had only seen with Kodachrome. Yes, the layers of exposure on the film had a relief to them, as if the silver had been hand etched onto the film base itself. And then into the scanner and you saw this clean three-dimensional image, smooth tones and no grain at all.

Roll Three: Kodak D-23
One of the first developers I ever used was Kodak D-76, it was at the time the preferred developer of my teacher Julie Douglas. While I have only used a single jug of the stuff since, I have latched onto its cousin, the slower acting D-23. I’ve souped plenty of film stocks in it and like how it makes Tri-X look, so I figured it would be a good candidate.

Nature Trail...

Roughing It

Taking on the CRAIG

Take a Seat

I really liked D-23, it performed as I expected it would give the usual smooth tones all the way through the grayscale. Indeed an excellent choice for the film. I’m now hankering to try this with medium and large format versions of HP5+.

Roll Four: Kodak Microdol-X
I happened across this developer completely by accident during my 52-sheet project and came to enjoy using it. While an older Kodak developer again, and not available under the Kodak name, but Legacy Pro has their Mic-X which is the same. Microdol is a fine grain soft developer so it should be able to work a bit of magic.

The Masons

Back to the War

Lighting the Way

Pick Me Up

I honestly don’t know what went wrong with these photos. They all seemed overexposed. The camera, my Nikon F5 has a solid meter, the ASA/ISO setting was correct. Maybe it was the Orange-22 filter I used or the harsh sunlight. I had to work some post-processing magic on these. I think that I need to reduce the developing times by 1 minute or give the film a slight pull to make Microdol-X work.

Roll Five: Kodak HC-110
When you’re having trouble with something, how about going back to an old friend. Kodak HC-110 is one of two developers I have not stopped using since I started developing my own black & white film. The other is Rodinal, but not wanting to give the film one hell of a pull, I figured HC-110 in the standard Dilution B would be a good way to help out.

Blown Open

Eroded Away

Follow the Rails

Sun Dappled

HP5 sings with HC-110, you get to see how sharp the film stock is with this Kodak developer, and the contrast is dead on point even in the strange lighting conditions that are a sun-dappled forest at high-noon. While not exactly the best time to be out shooting it provides a real test for what a film and developer can do, and HC-110 is a sure winner in this case.

When I first set out to shoot these five rolls of HP5+ I went into it thinking I didn’t like the film stock in 35mm, however, upon shooting these five rolls I realised that I did like the film, I had just had some bad encounters with it in the past. In the end, it’s a solid film stock one that I will use in the future because I won’t always be able to find Kodak Tri-X, and now I have several developing options. I also plan on trying to perfect that Microdol-X time/speed issue.

Technical Data:
Roll One: Sheridan College, Skilled Trades Centre, Oakville, Ontario
Nikon F5 – AF-S Nikkor 14-24mm 1:2.8G – Ilford HP5+ @ ASA-400
SPUR HRX (1+17) 11:00 @ 20C

Roll Two: Toronto, Ontario
Contax G2 – Carl Zeiss Planar 2/45 T* – Ilford HP5+ @ ASA-200
Pyrocat-HD (1+1+100) 9:00 @ 20C

Roll Three: Rattlesnake Point, Milton, Ontario
Nikon F2 Photomic – AI-S Nikkor 50mm 1:1.4 (Yellow-12) – Ilford HP5+ @ ASA-400
Kodak D-23 (Stock) 7:30 @ 20C

Roll Four: Ancaster, Ontario
Nikon F5 – AF Nikkor 50mm 1:1.4D (Orange-22) – Ilford HP5+ @ ASA-400
Kodak Microdol-X (Stock) 11:00 @ 20C

Roll Five: McCraney Valley Park, Oakville, Ontario
Nikon FA – AI-S Nikkor 35mm 1:2.8 (Yellow-12) – Ilford HP5+ @ ASA-400
Kodak HC-110 Dil. B 5:00 @ 20C

#photochat – 5 October 2017 – Silly Mistakes

#photochat – 5 October 2017 – Silly Mistakes

Established in 2013 by MainStreetHost and taken on by Alex Luyckx Photography in 2015, #photochat is a community of photography professionals and enthusiasts who congregate to talk shop and discuss anything and everything photography. To participate in our weekly chat (every Thursday at 1:00pm ET) search the #photochat hashtag to see the conversation, or find me at @AlexLuyckxPhoto on Twitter for more info. Be sure to include the hashtag in your tweets to answer the questions and talk with the other participants.

If there’s a topic you’d like to see covered in #photochat, hop onto Facebook, Twitter, or good old fashioned Email and let me know!

The Topic for Thursday 5 October 2017 is about Silly Mistakes!

Question 1 – What piece of equipment do you keep on forgetting?
Question 2 – What Rookie Mistake do you still keep repeating?
Question 3 – How do you go about fixing up any mistakes you make?
Question 4 – What steps do you take to prevent you from forgetting equipment?
Question 5 – Share a photo that you thought you had wreaked with a silly mistake, but it turned out!

Past topics have included: Show and Tell, The Discomfort Zone, The Comfort Zone, Influence, Consistency, Inclement Weather, Stock Photography, Going Freelance, Photo Sharing, Photography Books, Creativity in Photography, Colour Photography, Black & White (2017), Critiques, Lenses, Blogging, Regrets, What’s in Your Bag (2017), Promotion, Random Questions, Photo Projects, Shooting Film, Photographic Buzz Words, Photographic Wins, Photographic Fails, Still Life, Portrait Photography, Automotive Photography (2017), Traveling With Gear, Photographic Quirks, Why is Photography Important (2017), Ethics (2017), Difficult Situations, Phone Photography, Web sites, Self-Improvement (2017), Personal Branding, Photographic Gifts, Brand Loyalties (2016), Location Scouting, Food Photography, The Good, The Bad, Photographic Slumps, Wedding Photography, Post-Processing, Digital Photography, Film Photography, Keeping It Simple, Photographic Fads, Regular Maintenance, Personal Vision, Travel, Snapshots, Extreme Weather, Sports Photography, Pet Peeves, Out of the Box, Portrait Photography, Infrared Photography, Good Practices, Landscape Photography, Photography as a Skill, Photography as an Art, Getting Noticed, Post-Processing, Film Processing, Instant Photography, Tripods, Pet Photography, Budget Photography, Nude Photography, Workflow, Vintage Gear, The 5 W’s, Going Pro, Importance of Photography, Filters, Photography & the Law, Editing Your Work, Travelling with Gear, Street Photography, Get Up and Go (Motivation), Photographic Goals (2016), Low-Light Photography, Photographic Dreams, Cold Weather, Naturally Artificial, LoFi Love, Product Photography, Chasing Light, Automotive Photography, Finding Inspiration, All About You, Landscapes, Shooting for Colour, Digital Video, Back to School Parts I and II, Self-Publishing, Keeping Calm, Photography & Zen, Camera Bags, Dealing with People, Printing Your Work, Adventure Photography, Camera Clubs, Fireworks Photography, Aircraft Photography, Architectural Photography, Photo meetups, Getting Rid of GAS, Keeping it Organized, Favourite Things, Photo Competitions, Biggest Challenges, Compact System Cameras, film vs. digital, landscape photography, seasonal photography, the basics of composition, what’s in your camera bag?, night photography, portrait photography, forced perspective photography, black and white photography, golden hour photography, macro photography, how photography has changed your life, to photoshop or not, motion photography, photojournalism, the best gifts for photographers in 2014, extreme weather photography, photographic aspirations, street photography, “why are you a photographer?”, improvisational lighting tactics, post-processing rituals, photographic blunders, getting paid, photographic triumphs, shooting hardship, photographic anxieties, quick thinking, making a difference, favorites, appropriation, brand loyalties, small photography, BIG photography, focus, photography in advertising, battle scars, sharing your photography, creative evolution, the inanimate subject, photo vs. video, emerging tech, teaching the craft, getting the shot, traveling with your camera, sweet gear deals, mobile lighting solutions, quelling frustrations, finding work, sensitive subjects, DIY projects, defamation, making and maintaining a website, in defense of photography, capturing action, post-processing, photo lingo, cold weather shooting, food photography, death in photography, film photography, famous photos, critiques, videography, user-generated content, composition, iPhoneography, standing up for yourself, blogging, workflow, the first time, candid portraiture, copyright and licensing, ethics, gear investments, inspiration, long shots, making it in the photo business, networking, night photography, perks of being a photographer, photographer stressors, photography philosophy, photography trends, picking your priorities, pricing, promoting yourself and your work, protecting your assets, self-improvement, odd photography, and travel.

Skilled Trades – A Farewell to a Campus

Skilled Trades – A Farewell to a Campus

September 2017 marked a milestone for Sheridan College. As a College Sheridan began its life as a collection of Satellite campuses, those campuses closed, the college moved to centralised campuses. One remained the Skills Training Centre. This September that campus would close its doors as the last satellite campus for Sheridan. STC, as it was better known, holds a special spot for me. I worked at the campus for several years, establishing a permanent IT presence at the small campus. So when I learned that the campus was doomed to closure I made a point to return one last time and document it. And document it as I would any of the abandoned buildings I had explored in the past.

Part One – Before the Move
Unlike many abandoned buildings I have explored in the past, in this case, I had a chance to visit the campus before it closed.

STC - Before the Move

STC - Before the Move

STC - Before the Move

STC - Before the Move

Part Two – Empty Walls
At the end of August, all but one department had left the building leaving nothing more than an empty shell.

The Approaching Storm

Registrar

The Moody Darkness

Leftovers

Part Three – Finally In Colour
Having one last errand at the campus I decided to give it one last go around with a digital camera.

Cleanliness

Lab

Tickle Me

Metropolis

Techincal Details:
Part One:
Hasselblad 500c – Carl Zeiss Distagon 50mm 1:4 – Fuji Acros 100 @ ASA-100
Kodak D-23 (Stock) 9:00 @ 20C
Part Two:
Nikon F5 – AF-S Nikkor 14-24mm 1:2.8G – Ilford HP5+ @ ASA-400
SPUR HRX (1+17) 11:00 @ 20C
Part Three:
Sony a6000 – Sony E PZ 16-50mm 1:3.5-5.6 OSS

Classic Camera Revival – Episode 33 – That Awkward Moment

Classic Camera Revival – Episode 33 – That Awkward Moment

ccr-logo-leaf

We are not fanboys of any camera system and half the fun of running a podcast about classic cameras is being able to both praise the cameras we like and point out the more difficult aspects of others. Now don’t get us wrong, all these cameras are actually decent machines on their image quality but sometimes you just have to ask, what were the designers thinking when they started to make these cameras.

Cameras Featured on Today’s Show
Olympus XA – The smallest ‘full frame’ rangefinder out there, with solid optics, and a cult following. But you have to contend with a hair trigger, that would just as soon shoot every other frame without you wanting it to do so.

CCR Review 26 - Olympus XA

  • Make: Olympus
  • Model: XA
  • Type: Rangefinder
  • Format: 135 (35mm), 36x24mm
  • Lens: Fixed, Olympus F.Zuiko 1:2.8 f=35mm
  • Year of Manufacture: 1979

Sarah Silver
Olympus XA – Olympus F.Zuiko 1:2.8 f=35mm – Ilford Delta 400

Fire Station #17
Olympus XA – Olympus F.Zuiko 1:2.8 f=35mm – Kodak Plus-X – Kodak Xtol (1+1) 7:15 @ 20C

CCR Review 26 - Olympus XA
Olympus XA – Olympus F.Zuiko 1:2.8 f=35mm – Ultrafine Extreme 400 – Kodak Xtol (1+1) 9:30 @ 20C

Mamiya Universal – An attempt to draw away press photographers from their large format rigs. This highly customizable roll film rangefinder takes all the humbling parts of a large format camera and slaps it onto a medium format camera without taking advantage of most things that would make a medium format rangefinder great.

CCR Review 47 - Mamyia Universal

  • Make: Mamiya
  • Model: Universal
  • Type: Rangefinder
  • Format: Medium (120/220), 6×7, 6×9 or Polaroid (Type 100)
  • Lens: Interchangeable, Mamiya Press Mount
  • Year of Manufacture: 1969

Mill Pond - Mamiya Universal Press
Mamyia Universal – Mamyia-Sekor 90mm 1:3.5 – Rollei RPX 100 @ ASA-100 – Kodak Xtol (Stock) 8:00 @ 20C

Justine In Colour 2
Mamiya Universal – Mamiya-Sekor 1:4.5 f=127mm – Fuji FP-100c

CCR Review 47 - Mamyia Universal
Mamiya Universal – Mamiya-Sekor 1:4.5 f=127mm – Fuji Acros 100 @ ASA-100 – FA-1027 (1+14) 9:30 @ 20C

Barnack Leicas – An iconic camera in any circle, the Leica III has remained true to the early design of Oskar Barnack as a compact camera designed at the time to accept motion picture film (35mm). While of high optical quality, these things can be a bit of pain, especially when it comes to loading your film.

CCR - Review 36 - Leica IIIc
An example of a Leica IIIc with a mounted Leitz Summitar f=5cm 1:2 lens

  • Make: Ernst Leitz GmbH
  • Model: Leica I through the Leica IIIg
  • Type: Rangefinder
  • Format: 135, 36x24mm
  • Lens: Interchangable, Leica Thread Mount/M39
  • Year of Manufacture: 1930-1960

Ghost House
Leica IIIf – Leitz Elmar f=5cm 1:3.5 – Kodak Tri-X 400 – Kodak Xtol (1+1) 9:00 @ 20C

Old Train Station
Leica IIIa – Voigtlander Helios 15mm/4.5 lens – Kodak Tri-X 400 – Pyrocat-HD 1+1+100 16:00 @ 20C

Project:1812 - Fort Erie
Leica IIIc – Leitz Summitar f=5cm 1:2 (Yellow Filter) – Fuji Neopan SS – HC-110 Dil. B 5:30 @ 20C

Exakta VX1000 – The camera made famous by Alfred Hitchcock’s film, Rear Window, is designed to throw any photographer into fits because it’s designed to be used left handed. Yes, everything is switched around with this camera from how you would normally operate an SLR. But don’t look past it yet, those lenses are Carl Zeiss.

CCR Review 61 - Exakta VX IIa

  • Make: Ihagee Dresden
  • Model: Exakta VX1000
  • Type: Single Lens Reflex
  • Format: 135, 36x24mm
  • Lens: Interchangeable, Exakta Bayonet
  • Year of Manufacture: 1967-1970

Scritching - B/W
Ihagee Dresden Exakta VXIIa – Steinheil Munchen Culminar 135mm ƒ/4.5 – Kodak Gold 200 – Jobo C-41 Press Kit

Bridge Home
Ihagee Dresden Exakta VXIIa – Carl Zeiss Jena Tessar 50mm ƒ/2.8 – Kodak Portra 160NC

CCR Review 61 - Exakta VX IIa
Exakta VX IIA – Carl Zeiss Jena Biotar 2/58 – Kodak TMax 100 @ ASA-100 – Kodak D-23 (Stock) 9:30 @ 20C

Cambo Legend 8×10 – Well it goes without saying that anything with 8×10 in the camera model is going to be awkward because when it comes to using a monorail camera in the field, you need a mule, or in Donna’s case a husband. But still, there’s nothing better in the standard camera sized better than an 8×10 negative.

Cambo SC 8x10

  • Make: Cambo
  • Model: Legend 8×10
  • Type: View Camera, Monorail
  • Format: Large Format, 8×10
  • Lens: Interchangeable, Cambo Lens Board
  • Year of Manufacture:

Black & White Slides
While the summer has gone, we still have the memory through beautiful slides. But wait, black & white? Yes, it is a thing! In the past there’s the legendary Agfa Scala 200x, today there are still two black & white reversal stocks on the market with Fomapan 100R and Adox Scala 160. However, there is a small lab that specializes in turning your black & white negative films into reversal slides, and that’s Dr5. Throughout the spring and summer the gang has been shooting, sending, and waiting. And Dr5 delivered some beautiful results!

For Alex, he selected to shoot Ilford HP5+ because it was a rainy dull sort of day. The Results speak for themselves in his view.
Dr5 Test Roll - Ilford HP5+

Dr5 Test Roll - Ilford HP5+

Dr5 Test Roll - Ilford HP5+

Bill decided to shoot some of the new dedicated black & white slide film from Adox, Adox Scala 160x. This film stock is based on the legendary Agfa Scala 200x.
The Grainery in March

Oakville Harbour March 2017

Downtown Oakville in March

John, like Alex, took a normally B&W Negative film, Ilford FP4+ and had it turned into a Positive. FP4+ is already a beautiful film but this made it all the better.

Of course, Dr5 is the only commercial lab out there doing B&W Slides, but that doesn’t mean you can’t-do them yourself at home as Mike has done.
Soft Bokeh

Looking for a good spot to get your gear and material fix check out Burlington Camera (Burlington, ON), Downtown Camera (Toronto, ON), Film Plus (Toronto, ON), Belle Arte Camera (Hamilton, ON), Pond’s FotoSource (Guleph, ON), Foto Art Camera (Owen Sound, ON). Out West there’s The Camera Store (Calgary, AB) and Beau Photo Supply (Vancouver, BC). Additionally you can order online at Argentix (Quebec), buyfilm.ca (Ontario), the Film Photography Project or Freestyle Photographic.

Also you can connect with us through email: classiccamerarevivial[at]gmail[dot]com or by Facebook, we’re at Classic Camera Revival or even Twitter @ccamerarevival