Author: Alex

CCR Review 84 – Polaroid One

CCR Review 84 – Polaroid One

Polaroid, the name itself implies instant photography, and in this case, you would be 100% correct, the Polaroid One is probably the best Type-600 camera I have used. It’s also the most modern being the last one built before the company went bankrupt in the early 21st-century, and while Polaroid Originals does produce brand new modern instant cameras in the form of the stunning OneStep2 and the I-1. But if you have a desire for a classic Polaroid then look no further than the Polaroid One.

CCR Review 84 - Polaroid One600

The Dirt
Make: Polaroid
Model: One
Type: Point-And-Shoot
Format: Type-600 Instant
Lens: Fixed, Polaroid 100mm f/11.5
Year of Manufacture: 2001

Building On UpSCAET

The Good
The primary and only reason the Polaroid One is top of the game for classic Polaroid cameras and by extension the Image/Spectra system is that they are the newest out there. You don’t find many people out there, outside of Polaroid Originals, who service the cameras and most of the cameras are starting to get old. This instantly shoots this 2001 beauty to the top of the list for cameras to last. Secondly, the One uses the same optics as the Polaroid Spectra, so we’re talking a glass lens, not the plastic that they were using up until the 1990s. But you still have the classic Polaroid look with the soft edges and blown out highlights. Not to mention a plethora of other functions, such as a self-timer and ability to turn off the built-in flash, but that isn’t advisable unless you’re under bright light. And finally, the camera itself just looks awesome, with a more streamlined look of the Spectra, and the pop-up style it does look unique to the type-600 cameras as gone is the classic clamshell look from the 80s and 90s. Plus it makes it a lot easier to handle than the older ones.

Burlington CameraPolaroid Week - Fall 2017

The Bad
While one of the better choices of all the classic Polaroid cameras out there, this is still a Polaroid and when it does die it’s dead. Plus these cameras were not produced for long, so they are rare on the used market. In fact, I never even knew they existed until I got the one I own from my good friend Marcia. And there is, of course, the quality issue as well, the camera itself won’t produced the best quality image, but it certainly is fun! But one of the biggest downsides to these cameras is the cost actually to use them. While the cost of the film has gone down and the quality improved from the very early days of the Impossible Project. These are not cameras that you can just shoot on a regular basis, or your wallet will not be happy with you.

Polaroid Week - Fall 2017Polaroid Week - Fall 2017

The Lowdown
While the camera is not the iconic rainbow oneStep or folding SX-70, it is your best bet for actually going out and shooting classic Polaroid gear. You might even be able to find new-old-stock or new-in-box with this camera. And with the improvements from the fine folks at Polaroid Originals, I do intend to keep working with the format, if only for special occasions such as Polaroid Week or Family events for something different that you cannot duplicate easily with a digital camera.

All Photos Taken in Ontario, Canada
Polaroid One – Polaroid 100mm f/11.5 – Polaroid Originals Color and B&W
Impossible Instant Process

#photochat – 22 March 2018 – Optics

#photochat – 22 March 2018 – Optics

Established in 2013 by MainStreetHost and taken on by Alex Luyckx Photography in 2015, #photochat is a community of photography professionals and enthusiasts who congregate to talk shop and discuss anything and everything photography. To participate in our weekly chat (every Thursday at 1:00pm ET) search the #photochat hashtag to see the conversation, or find me at @AlexLuyckxPhoto on Twitter for more info. Be sure to include the hashtag in your tweets to answer the questions and talk with the other participants.

If there’s a topic you’d like to see covered in #photochat, hop onto Facebook, Twitter, or good old fashioned Email and let me know!

The Topic for Thursday 22 March 2018 is about Optics!

Question 1 – What is one lens you always find yourself reaching for?
Question 2 – What lens in your kit is one you don’t use as often as you would like?
Question 3 – Do you have a dream lens?
Question 4 – Is there a lens that you were rather disappointed in?
Question 5 – Share photos taken with any of the lenses you’ve mentioned!

Past topics have included: Keep it Simple, Accessories, Helping Out, Battle Damage, Ultrawide Angle, All About the Love, Podcasts, What’s in your Bag (2018), Self-Improvement, Snapshots, Exposure Troubles, Street Photography (2017), Event Photography, Photographic Gifts, Film Photography (2017), Photographic Annoyances, Locations, Strange Habits, Collaboration, Buying Work, Silly Mistakes, Show and Tell, The Discomfort Zone, The Comfort Zone, Influence, Consistency, Inclement Weather, Stock Photography, Going Freelance, Photo Sharing, Photography Books, Creativity in Photography, Colour Photography, Black & White (2017), Critiques, Lenses, Blogging, Regrets, What’s in Your Bag (2017), Promotion, Random Questions, Photo Projects, Shooting Film, Photographic Buzz Words, Photographic Wins, Photographic Fails, Still Life, Portrait Photography, Automotive Photography (2017), Traveling With Gear, Photographic Quirks, Why is Photography Important (2017), Ethics (2017), Difficult Situations, Phone Photography, Web sites, Self-Improvement (2017), Personal Branding, Photographic Gifts, Brand Loyalties (2016), Location Scouting, Food Photography, The Good, The Bad, Photographic Slumps, Wedding Photography, Post-Processing, Digital Photography, Film Photography, Keeping It Simple, Photographic Fads, Regular Maintenance, Personal Vision, Travel, Snapshots, Extreme Weather, Sports Photography, Pet Peeves, Out of the Box, Portrait Photography, Infrared Photography, Good Practices, Landscape Photography, Photography as a Skill, Photography as an Art, Getting Noticed, Post-Processing, Film Processing, Instant Photography, Tripods, Pet Photography, Budget Photography, Nude Photography, Workflow, Vintage Gear, The 5 W’s, Going Pro, Importance of Photography, Filters, Photography & the Law, Editing Your Work, Travelling with Gear, Street Photography, Get Up and Go (Motivation), Photographic Goals (2016), Low-Light Photography, Photographic Dreams, Cold Weather, Naturally Artificial, LoFi Love, Product Photography, Chasing Light, Automotive Photography, Finding Inspiration, All About You, Landscapes, Shooting for Colour, Digital Video, Back to School Parts I and II, Self-Publishing, Keeping Calm, Photography & Zen, Camera Bags, Dealing with People, Printing Your Work, Adventure Photography, Camera Clubs, Fireworks Photography, Aircraft Photography, Architectural Photography, Photo meetups, Getting Rid of GAS, Keeping it Organized, Favourite Things, Photo Competitions, Biggest Challenges, Compact System Cameras, film vs. digital, landscape photography, seasonal photography, the basics of composition, what’s in your camera bag?, night photography, portrait photography, forced perspective photography, black and white photography, golden hour photography, macro photography, how photography has changed your life, to photoshop or not, motion photography, photojournalism, the best gifts for photographers in 2014, extreme weather photography, photographic aspirations, street photography, “why are you a photographer?”, improvisational lighting tactics, post-processing rituals, photographic blunders, getting paid, photographic triumphs, shooting hardship, photographic anxieties, quick thinking, making a difference, favorites, appropriation, brand loyalties, small photography, BIG photography, focus, photography in advertising, battle scars, sharing your photography, creative evolution, the inanimate subject, photo vs. video, emerging tech, teaching the craft, getting the shot, traveling with your camera, sweet gear deals, mobile lighting solutions, quelling frustrations, finding work, sensitive subjects, DIY projects, defamation, making and maintaining a website, in defense of photography, capturing action, post-processing, photo lingo, cold weather shooting, food photography, death in photography, film photography, famous photos, critiques, videography, user-generated content, composition, iPhoneography, standing up for yourself, blogging, workflow, the first time, candid portraiture, copyright and licensing, ethics, gear investments, inspiration, long shots, making it in the photo business, networking, night photography, perks of being a photographer, photographer stressors, photography philosophy, photography trends, picking your priorities, pricing, promoting yourself and your work, protecting your assets, self-improvement, odd photography, and travel.

CCR:FRB – Review 08 – Ilford HP5+

CCR:FRB – Review 08 – Ilford HP5+

When it comes to iconic films, Ilford HP5+ rates as one of the big ones, with a history as old as Ilford FP4+ and dates back to 1935. And while it only got its ASA-400 speed rating in 1960 is certainly is a film that can take amazing images. While many see HP5+ as a direct competitor to Kodak Tri-X, I do see two separate films each responding differently to the range of developers out there. And while I’ve had a rocky time with the 35mm version of the film, I’ve come to accept HP5+ is certainly an amazing film!

CCR:FRB - Review 08 - Ilford HP5+

Film Specs
Type: Panchromatic B&W
Film Base: Acetate
Film Speed: ASA-400, Latitude: 100-6400
Formats Available: 35mm, 120, Sheets

Roll 01 – Kodak D-76
You usually cannot go wrong with D-76, however, in this case, I cannot recommend the developer as I feel it doesn’t show off the film as well as I’ve come to know the product. Which is strange because the film does better in the slower D-23. The biggest issue here is that they produce a rather boring image, the tones are too close together and a bit more grainy that I have come to expect from the film stock. While not a bad combination, I do think there are better choices.

CCR:FRB - Review 08 - Ilford HP5+ - Roll 01 (D-76)CCR:FRB - Review 08 - Ilford HP5+ - Roll 01 (D-76)CCR:FRB - Review 08 - Ilford HP5+ - Roll 01 (D-76)CCR:FRB - Review 08 - Ilford HP5+ - Roll 01 (D-76)

Technical Details:
Mamiya m645 – Mamiya-Sekor C 35mm 1:3.5 – Ilford HP5+ @ ASA-400
Kodak D-76 (Stock) 7:30 @ 20C

Roll 02 – Pyrocat-HD
I remember the first time seeing Mat Marrash’s work with Ilford HP5+ and Pyrocat-HD and decided that is the look I want out of my HP5+. And while you lose a stop of speed, the loss is well worth it. You get amazing tones across the board, fine grain (even in 35mm), and sharp images. Great for when you’re shooting in any light as you have a compensating developer to back you up. Not to mention as a fun little note, if you look at the actual negatives, you have a 3D relief similar to what you have with Kodachrome slides.

The Old Mission ChurchAmong the CrossesThe Old 31The Ore Dock -- From Above

Technical Details:
Intrepid 4×5 – SK Symmar-S 210/5.6, Fujinon-W 125/5.6 – Ilford HP5+ @ ASA-200
Pyrocat-HD (1+1+100) 9:00 @ 20C

Roll 03 – Kodak HC-110
When I was exploring how to develop HP5+ in 35mm better, one of my obvious choices was HC-110. It’s always done well in most films I’ve developed in it, and HP5+ is no exception. Rich tones, smooth grain, and sharpness all in one package in no matter what format you shoot it in. You can easily shoot the film in mixed light with this developer and find all your details right there and makes the film easy to print!

A Space between ThemMaking an ExitLow LevelsA Mere Trickle

Techincal Details:
Nikon FA – AI-S Nikkor 35mm 1:2.8 (Yellow-12) – Ilford HP5+ @ ASA-400
Kodak HC-110 Dil. B 5:00 @ 20C

Roll 04 – Kodak TMax Developer
Sadly, in this case, TMax developer and HP5+ do not play well together. And I’m honestly not surprised because the beginning of reviewing cameras I used HP5+ in Ilford DD-X and wasn’t too pleased with the results. The resulting images I found were muddy, grainier than normal and just plain boring in the long run! I certainly would not be using a T-Grain developer with this film.

CCR Review 83 - Fuji GSW690IICCR Review 83 - Fuji GSW690IICCR Review 83 - Fuji GSW690IICCR Review 83 - Fuji GSW690II

Technical Details:
Fuji GSW690ii – EBC Fujinon-W f=65mm 1:5.6 – Ilford HP5+ @ ASA-400
Kodak TMax Developer (1+4) 6:30 @ 20C

Final Thoughts
While I only came up with two solid options for developing this film in this blog post that doesn’t make the film a bad option. In fact, HP5+ is a wonderful film that if you want something different than Tri-X is certainly worth a purchase. And there are plenty of other amazing developers that work well with the film. While I haven’t developed it in Rodinal, I really should give it a pull to ASA-100 and give it a go, also several other Ilford Developers such as Perceptol and Microphen allow you to push to film to the top of its latitude of ASA-6400. While it’s not Tri-X, nor should it be compared to it, HP5+ stands tall on its very own as a good choice for a fast film.

#photochat – 15 March 2018 – Keep It Simple Silly

#photochat – 15 March 2018 – Keep It Simple Silly

Established in 2013 by MainStreetHost and taken on by Alex Luyckx Photography in 2015, #photochat is a community of photography professionals and enthusiasts who congregate to talk shop and discuss anything and everything photography. To participate in our weekly chat (every Thursday at 1:00pm ET) search the #photochat hashtag to see the conversation, or find me at @AlexLuyckxPhoto on Twitter for more info. Be sure to include the hashtag in your tweets to answer the questions and talk with the other participants.

If there’s a topic you’d like to see covered in #photochat, hop onto Facebook, Twitter, or good old fashioned Email and let me know!

The Topic for Thursday 15 March 2018 is about Keeping It Simple!

Question 1 – How do you keep your photography simple? (One Camera/lens ect)?
Question 2 – Do you use cluttered or singular compositions?
Question 3a – What are the pros to keeping it simple?
Question 3b – What are the cons of keeping it simple?
Question 4 – How do you light a subject simply? (One Strobe, No Strobe, Reflector?)
Question 5 – Share any photos done simply!

Past topics have included: Accessories, Helping Out, Battle Damage, Ultrawide Angle, All About the Love, Podcasts, What’s in your Bag (2018), Self-Improvement, Snapshots, Exposure Troubles, Street Photography (2017), Event Photography, Photographic Gifts, Film Photography (2017), Photographic Annoyances, Locations, Strange Habits, Collaboration, Buying Work, Silly Mistakes, Show and Tell, The Discomfort Zone, The Comfort Zone, Influence, Consistency, Inclement Weather, Stock Photography, Going Freelance, Photo Sharing, Photography Books, Creativity in Photography, Colour Photography, Black & White (2017), Critiques, Lenses, Blogging, Regrets, What’s in Your Bag (2017), Promotion, Random Questions, Photo Projects, Shooting Film, Photographic Buzz Words, Photographic Wins, Photographic Fails, Still Life, Portrait Photography, Automotive Photography (2017), Traveling With Gear, Photographic Quirks, Why is Photography Important (2017), Ethics (2017), Difficult Situations, Phone Photography, Web sites, Self-Improvement (2017), Personal Branding, Photographic Gifts, Brand Loyalties (2016), Location Scouting, Food Photography, The Good, The Bad, Photographic Slumps, Wedding Photography, Post-Processing, Digital Photography, Film Photography, Keeping It Simple, Photographic Fads, Regular Maintenance, Personal Vision, Travel, Snapshots, Extreme Weather, Sports Photography, Pet Peeves, Out of the Box, Portrait Photography, Infrared Photography, Good Practices, Landscape Photography, Photography as a Skill, Photography as an Art, Getting Noticed, Post-Processing, Film Processing, Instant Photography, Tripods, Pet Photography, Budget Photography, Nude Photography, Workflow, Vintage Gear, The 5 W’s, Going Pro, Importance of Photography, Filters, Photography & the Law, Editing Your Work, Travelling with Gear, Street Photography, Get Up and Go (Motivation), Photographic Goals (2016), Low-Light Photography, Photographic Dreams, Cold Weather, Naturally Artificial, LoFi Love, Product Photography, Chasing Light, Automotive Photography, Finding Inspiration, All About You, Landscapes, Shooting for Colour, Digital Video, Back to School Parts I and II, Self-Publishing, Keeping Calm, Photography & Zen, Camera Bags, Dealing with People, Printing Your Work, Adventure Photography, Camera Clubs, Fireworks Photography, Aircraft Photography, Architectural Photography, Photo meetups, Getting Rid of GAS, Keeping it Organized, Favourite Things, Photo Competitions, Biggest Challenges, Compact System Cameras, film vs. digital, landscape photography, seasonal photography, the basics of composition, what’s in your camera bag?, night photography, portrait photography, forced perspective photography, black and white photography, golden hour photography, macro photography, how photography has changed your life, to photoshop or not, motion photography, photojournalism, the best gifts for photographers in 2014, extreme weather photography, photographic aspirations, street photography, “why are you a photographer?”, improvisational lighting tactics, post-processing rituals, photographic blunders, getting paid, photographic triumphs, shooting hardship, photographic anxieties, quick thinking, making a difference, favorites, appropriation, brand loyalties, small photography, BIG photography, focus, photography in advertising, battle scars, sharing your photography, creative evolution, the inanimate subject, photo vs. video, emerging tech, teaching the craft, getting the shot, traveling with your camera, sweet gear deals, mobile lighting solutions, quelling frustrations, finding work, sensitive subjects, DIY projects, defamation, making and maintaining a website, in defense of photography, capturing action, post-processing, photo lingo, cold weather shooting, food photography, death in photography, film photography, famous photos, critiques, videography, user-generated content, composition, iPhoneography, standing up for yourself, blogging, workflow, the first time, candid portraiture, copyright and licensing, ethics, gear investments, inspiration, long shots, making it in the photo business, networking, night photography, perks of being a photographer, photographer stressors, photography philosophy, photography trends, picking your priorities, pricing, promoting yourself and your work, protecting your assets, self-improvement, odd photography, and travel.

CCR Review 83 – Fuji GSW690II

CCR Review 83 – Fuji GSW690II

The Fuji GSW690ii is not a camera you need, but it sure is fun to have. That being said, a lot is going for the camera and if you’re like me, and are a wide-angle junky who loves to shoot big and wide than a GSW690 is certainly a camera that will make you very happy. There’s a reason they have the nickname Texas Leica because everything’s bigger in Texas, and what’s better than a superb rangefinder, a magnificent rangefinder that shoots 6×9 and a wide angle lens that covers everything. Special thanks to James Lee for loaning out this beauty!

CCR Review 83 - Fuji GSW690II

The Dirt
Make: Fuji
Model: GSW690II
Type: Rangefinder
Format: Medium Format, 120/220, 6×9
Lens: Fixed, EBC Fujinon-W f=65mm 1:5.6
Year of Manufacture: 1985

CCR Review 83 - Fuji GSW690IICCR Review 83 - Fuji GSW690II

The Good
There are several points about the camera that stand out as being the number one reason this camera is awesome. But honestly, given the size of the camera, I’m amazed at how light the beast is and how easily it fits in hand. You could easily spend a whole day shooting with the camera and not have it weigh on your neck at all. And along the same lines how easy is to operate, I didn’t even have to read the manual, and I had it mostly figured out. Not to mention on a cold winter’s day, the camera works great when your hands are in gloves. Another factor that helps the camera out on a cold day is the fact it’s mechanical, no batteries at all in this camera. The viewfinder is big and bright, with clear framing lines to help with image composition. And finally, the optics are superb. I’ve shot Fujinon optics on my 4×5 almost since I started working with Large Format and have never complained about it. And while the lens is only rated to f/5.6 at wide open, trust me, this isn’t a problem as even wide open and given the 65mm focal length everything in the frame will be in focus.

CCR Review 83 - Fuji GSW690IICCR Review 83 - Fuji GSW690II

The Bad
There are of course a few small items that do detract from this fantastic camera. The first being the rangefinder patch, given the size of the viewfinder the patch itself is rather small for the size and can easily be lost in low light or complex scenes, but it does have good contrast. Secondly, there’s the film loading, while easy given the camera’s size and style, and the film loads quickly, it is, however, the alignment of the starting line of the film that is hard to determine. I mean, if you’ve read the manual you can get it right, but in the camera itself, there’s no indication on where to put that line. Now if you mis-load the film you can still operate the camera, and shoot all eight frames on your 120 rolls, you do however lose that first frame. And finally, there are the exposure controls. While I can see the wisdom in making the controls for aperture and shutter different, the aperture control have two nice handles making it rather easy to adjust, the shutter control is recessed into the lens barrel and can be troublesome to operate.

CCR Review 83 - Fuji GSW690IICCR Review 83 - Fuji GSW690II

The Lowdown
Now, the camera doesn’t do anything automatically, so you will need to either use the Sunny-16 rule or carry around a meter, and if you’re shooting landscapes, a tripod might help also. I really should have used a tripod the two days I was out so I could see what the camera could do beyond f/5.6 (and I should take it out for one more spin). But the camera also handles wonderfully hand-held! Fuji did release three versions of the GSW690 cameras each of them would make an excellent choice, although some out there will say the original and the ii version are your best choices.

All Photos Taken in Oakville, Ontario
Fuji GSW690II – EBC Fujinon-W f=65mm 1:5.6 – Ilford HP5+ @ ASA-400
Kodak TMax Dev (1+4) 6:30 @ 20C

Toronto Film Shooters – Winter 2018

Toronto Film Shooters – Winter 2018

When it comes to the Winter meetups, the weather is always a crapshoot. But unlike last year, we were blessed with beautiful blue skies, bright sun, and temperatures above zero. I think that helped bring out a dozen shooters to invade the historic downtown of Unionville, Ontario.

The Train Don't Stop HereBeauty in SimplicityThe Planing MillThe General Store

I had first discovered Unionville thanks to one of my co-workers who mentioned that he and this girlfriend enjoyed the historic downtown. So last summer I hit it up on what turned into a hot summer’s day and I saw why. And the group that showed up completely agreed. The small size of the downtown, about a five-minute walk from end to end, allowed the group to spread out and me, as host, bounce from group to group. Of course, the best part is the gathering afterwards, the Unionville Arms proved to be an awesome spot for lunch. We even attracted the notice of the pub’s owner who thought we were a hockey team instead of a group of photographers.

A late morning StrollCatching the FiddlerRobCatching Water

If you’re interested in joining us on a future walk, the Toronto Film Shooters hosts four main walks a year, with a smattering of specialized walks. You can join us on our facebook group, or search for our events, they’re always public! And you don’t even have to be someone who shoots traditional film, just shoot me a line on FB or post on the event page and I’ll be more than happy to bring a spare camera for you and a roll of film.

Technical Details:
Group 1: Rolleiflex 2.8F – Carl Zeiss Planar 80mm 1:2.8 – JCH Streetpan 400 @ ASA-400
Kodak HC-110 Dil. F 12:30 @ 20C

Group 2: Nikon F5 – AF DC-Nikkor 105mm 1:2D – Ilford Delta 100 @ ASA-100
Kodak D-76 (1+1) 11:00 @ 20C

#photochat – 8 March 2018 – Accessories

#photochat – 8 March 2018 – Accessories

Established in 2013 by MainStreetHost and taken on by Alex Luyckx Photography in 2015, #photochat is a community of photography professionals and enthusiasts who congregate to talk shop and discuss anything and everything photography. To participate in our weekly chat (every Thursday at 1:00pm ET) search the #photochat hashtag to see the conversation, or find me at @AlexLuyckxPhoto on Twitter for more info. Be sure to include the hashtag in your tweets to answer the questions and talk with the other participants.

If there’s a topic you’d like to see covered in #photochat, hop onto Facebook, Twitter, or good old fashioned Email and let me know!

The Topic for Thursday 8 March 2018 is about Helping Out!

Question 1 – What photographic accessory (ies) never leaves your camera bag?
Question 2 – What non-photographic accessory (ies) never leaves your camera bag?
Question 3 – What has been the most useful accessory you have in your kit?
Question 4 – What is the least useful accessory you have, and why keep it?
Question 5 – Share an image that one of your accessories helped you create!

Past topics have included: Helping Out, Battle Damage, Ultrawide Angle, All About the Love, Podcasts, What’s in your Bag (2018), Self-Improvement, Snapshots, Exposure Troubles, Street Photography (2017), Event Photography, Photographic Gifts, Film Photography (2017), Photographic Annoyances, Locations, Strange Habits, Collaboration, Buying Work, Silly Mistakes, Show and Tell, The Discomfort Zone, The Comfort Zone, Influence, Consistency, Inclement Weather, Stock Photography, Going Freelance, Photo Sharing, Photography Books, Creativity in Photography, Colour Photography, Black & White (2017), Critiques, Lenses, Blogging, Regrets, What’s in Your Bag (2017), Promotion, Random Questions, Photo Projects, Shooting Film, Photographic Buzz Words, Photographic Wins, Photographic Fails, Still Life, Portrait Photography, Automotive Photography (2017), Traveling With Gear, Photographic Quirks, Why is Photography Important (2017), Ethics (2017), Difficult Situations, Phone Photography, Web sites, Self-Improvement (2017), Personal Branding, Photographic Gifts, Brand Loyalties (2016), Location Scouting, Food Photography, The Good, The Bad, Photographic Slumps, Wedding Photography, Post-Processing, Digital Photography, Film Photography, Keeping It Simple, Photographic Fads, Regular Maintenance, Personal Vision, Travel, Snapshots, Extreme Weather, Sports Photography, Pet Peeves, Out of the Box, Portrait Photography, Infrared Photography, Good Practices, Landscape Photography, Photography as a Skill, Photography as an Art, Getting Noticed, Post-Processing, Film Processing, Instant Photography, Tripods, Pet Photography, Budget Photography, Nude Photography, Workflow, Vintage Gear, The 5 W’s, Going Pro, Importance of Photography, Filters, Photography & the Law, Editing Your Work, Travelling with Gear, Street Photography, Get Up and Go (Motivation), Photographic Goals (2016), Low-Light Photography, Photographic Dreams, Cold Weather, Naturally Artificial, LoFi Love, Product Photography, Chasing Light, Automotive Photography, Finding Inspiration, All About You, Landscapes, Shooting for Colour, Digital Video, Back to School Parts I and II, Self-Publishing, Keeping Calm, Photography & Zen, Camera Bags, Dealing with People, Printing Your Work, Adventure Photography, Camera Clubs, Fireworks Photography, Aircraft Photography, Architectural Photography, Photo meetups, Getting Rid of GAS, Keeping it Organized, Favourite Things, Photo Competitions, Biggest Challenges, Compact System Cameras, film vs. digital, landscape photography, seasonal photography, the basics of composition, what’s in your camera bag?, night photography, portrait photography, forced perspective photography, black and white photography, golden hour photography, macro photography, how photography has changed your life, to photoshop or not, motion photography, photojournalism, the best gifts for photographers in 2014, extreme weather photography, photographic aspirations, street photography, “why are you a photographer?”, improvisational lighting tactics, post-processing rituals, photographic blunders, getting paid, photographic triumphs, shooting hardship, photographic anxieties, quick thinking, making a difference, favorites, appropriation, brand loyalties, small photography, BIG photography, focus, photography in advertising, battle scars, sharing your photography, creative evolution, the inanimate subject, photo vs. video, emerging tech, teaching the craft, getting the shot, traveling with your camera, sweet gear deals, mobile lighting solutions, quelling frustrations, finding work, sensitive subjects, DIY projects, defamation, making and maintaining a website, in defense of photography, capturing action, post-processing, photo lingo, cold weather shooting, food photography, death in photography, film photography, famous photos, critiques, videography, user-generated content, composition, iPhoneography, standing up for yourself, blogging, workflow, the first time, candid portraiture, copyright and licensing, ethics, gear investments, inspiration, long shots, making it in the photo business, networking, night photography, perks of being a photographer, photographer stressors, photography philosophy, photography trends, picking your priorities, pricing, promoting yourself and your work, protecting your assets, self-improvement, odd photography, and travel.

CCR:FRB – Review 07 – Bergger Pancro 400

CCR:FRB – Review 07 – Bergger Pancro 400

The name Bergger has been until recently been relatively unknown here in North America (at least to me) until recently when I learned that they were planning on introducing a new film stock, Pancro 400. While, Pancro 400 is the only offering from the company, and while you might still find their older BRF400+ film stock, Pancro 400 is a beautiful classic film emulsion. When I heard about the film through the Film Photography Project when they were just releasing the stock, I made a point to pick it up. I found a surprisingly beautiful film, despite the increased amount of grain. I would wager to say, Pancro 400 has the look of the early HP and Tri-X emulsions from Ilford and Kodak respectively.

CCR:FRB - Review 07 - Bergger Pancro 400

Film Specs
Type: Panchromatic B&W
Film Base: Acetate
Film Speed: ASA-400, Latitude: 200-1600
Formats Avaliable: 35mm, 120, Sheets

Roll 01 – Kodak D-76
What better way to develop a classic film than with a classic developer and D-76 does the film justice. You can see the full range of tones and the beautiful grain. While you can see a definite increase the grain for a 400-speed film in medium format, but it’s not as bad as it could be. While I did notice the film is a little more contrasty than it can be, you could probably tame that by cutting to dilution 1+1 or using the slower working D-23.

CCR Review 78 - Mamiya m645CCR Review 78 - Mamiya m645CCR Review 78 - Mamiya m645CCR Review 78 - Mamiya m645

Technical Details:
Mamiya m645 – Mamiya-Sekor C 45mm 1:2.8 N – Bergger Pancro 400 @ ASA-400
Kodak D-76 (Stock) 9:00 @ 20C

Roll 02 – Kodak HC-110
You can see the increased amount of grain that Pancro 400 has when souped in HC-110, but don’t let that scare you because it’s a beautiful grain pattern again. Oddly enough, you don’t see any increase, in contrast, using HC-110, but you do see an increase in the film’s sharpness. I also noticed that you see a darkening in the skies as if I had a yellow filter on the lens, which is a nice touch.

Spike in Blue SkyA Peaceful SceneThe Ultimate BankThe Falls!

Technical Details:
Hasselblad 500c – Carl Zeiss Planar 80mm 1:2.8 – Bergger Pancro 400 @ ASA-400
Kodak HC-110 Dil. B 9:00 @ 20C

Roll 03 – Kodak TMax Developer
I’m going to come right out and say it, TMax Developer and Pancro 400 is not the best combination. While shooting it in 35mm didn’t help, but the grain is fairly out of control, and the contrast is way too strong, and that’s with using a 1+9 dilution which should tame the contrast in the film. And while I’ve seen TMax do good jobs with classic grained films, it certainly does not do that job with Pancro 400.

CCR:FRB - Review 07 - Bergger Pancro 400 - Roll 03 (TMax Developer)CCR:FRB - Review 07 - Bergger Pancro 400 - Roll 03 (TMax Developer)CCR:FRB - Review 07 - Bergger Pancro 400 - Roll 03 (TMax Developer)CCR:FRB - Review 07 - Bergger Pancro 400 - Roll 03 (TMax Developer)

Techincal Details:
Nikon F5 – AF-S Nikkor 14-24mm 1:2.8G – Bergger Pancro 400 @ ASA-400
Kodak TMax Developer (1+9) 9:00 @ 20C

Roll 04 – Rodinal
You’d think I was crazy for putting a one-stop push and developing in Rodinal, but hey, when you’re reviewing a film, you have to take the good and the bad. But you know, Pancro 400 is a surprising film, even when shot indoors under less-than-ideal lighting conditions. Is the film grainy, yes, but not as much as I would have expected! The tones are rich, the contrast is deep, but the shots are amazing! And they actually look better than the TMax developer and that was shot at box speed.

CCR:FRB - Review 07 - Bergger Pancro 400 - Roll 04 (Rodinal)CCR:FRB - Review 07 - Bergger Pancro 400 - Roll 04 (Rodinal)CCR:FRB - Review 07 - Bergger Pancro 400 - Roll 04 (Rodinal)CCR:FRB - Review 07 - Bergger Pancro 400 - Roll 04 (Rodinal)

Technical Details:
Nikon F90 – AF Nikkor 35mm 1:2D – Bergger Pancro 400 @ ASA-800
Blazinal (1+25) 13:00 @ 20C

Final Thoughts
If you’re looking for a solid option for a classic film that looks like the high-speed films of the mid-twentieth century. Rich tones, contrast and grain, but all in a good way. You get a look at your images like those from the photography of the Second World War. While grainier than most modern films such as HP5+ and Tri-X, it still is a solid option for most photography out there. But I would avoid using TMax developer, especially in the 35mm format and stick with more classic developers like D-76, HC-110, Pyrocat-HD and Rodinal even with a push.

Project:1867 – State of the Project

Project:1867 – State of the Project

So we’re now three months into the new year and you may be wondering when the content from Project:1867 is going to start appearing here on the blog. So I’m here to give you an update on how this project is going to work, where it’s at currently, and the way content is going to hit the Internet. The short answer regarding online content is you’re going to have to wait. I mean, by this point I have not shot a single frame for the project, and you know what that’s okay. Unlike the War of 1812 project the primary vehicle was the Internet and this blog, the book became something that grew out of the blog posts. This time around, the reverse is true, the final published book is what is going to be the primary purpose of the project with the blog posts coming along as secondary.

What does this all mean? Well, the simple fact is that as the book is primary, I aim to build my shot list based on the narrative rather than just going out and shooting. Images will be posted first to Flickr, once an entire group of images are ready to go up. So I’ll be starting to capture images beginning in the spring, March is my goal. As for writing, we currently sit at the end of Part II, that is talking about the Upper Canada Rebellion and the following Patriot War/Raids that results from the uprisings. As always research and creating content has been slow, but I want to get this right the first time. So there’s a giant stack of books on my desk along with papers and notebooks that hold the notes and drafts for the project. And since I don’t have any end date in mind, it makes creating a long process but worth the wait as I’ll have a much more polished product at the end.

The photography, while I haven’t shot anything, is well in hand at this time I have a rather extensive plan on what I’m shooting, how I’m shooting it and better tracking than in my War of 1812 Project. I think my Project Management classes are starting to show in my work as well as my professional career. And that isn’t a bad thing. So in addition to my Google map, I have a rather extensive spreadsheet in which I can easily identify, track, and list the images as I move them through my workflow. This means that I can better post images online as a group, rather than on a roll by roll basis. As for the gear, the camera of choice is the Mamiya m645 rather than a Hasselblad. The reason is that I have a full lens kit for the Mamiya (35, 45, and 150mm lenses) and I can get 15 shots on a roll rather than 12. This means I have to use less film to complete the project. The film of choice remains Ilford FP4+ exposed at ASA-100 and developed in Kodak D-23. I aim to use a tripod and Spotmeter as much as possible, but in some cases, I may need to hand hold the camera and use my Gossen Lunasix F. I don’t think it’ll affect the overall feel of the images.

And finally, I’ve also started working on the book layout and graphics and general feel of the final product. I have also planned out the blog posts and hope to come up with a total of fifty-two topics to post on so that from start to finish it’ll be a year’s worth of content once per week. And being that I’ll have the material completely from the beginning I can post them in the correct order. Again I’ll be focusing more on events and places, with the people shuffled into ‘mass’ biographical posts based on the circumstances at hand, though in some cases individuals may get their posts should they prove important enough.

#photochat – 1 March 2018 – Helping Out

#photochat – 1 March 2018 – Helping Out

Established in 2013 by MainStreetHost and taken on by Alex Luyckx Photography in 2015, #photochat is a community of photography professionals and enthusiasts who congregate to talk shop and discuss anything and everything photography. To participate in our weekly chat (every Thursday at 1:00pm ET) search the #photochat hashtag to see the conversation, or find me at @AlexLuyckxPhoto on Twitter for more info. Be sure to include the hashtag in your tweets to answer the questions and talk with the other participants.

If there’s a topic you’d like to see covered in #photochat, hop onto Facebook, Twitter, or good old fashioned Email and let me know!

The Topic for Thursday 1 March 2018 is about Helping Out!

Question 1 – Have you ever received help in any form from a fellow photographer?
Question 2 – Have you ever given help in any form to a fellow photographer?
Question 3 – What is the single best piece of advice you’ve received from a fellow photographer?
Question 4 – What keeps you from sharing your knowledge or helping out a fellow photographer?
Question 5 – Share a photo taken using some advice or a technique learned from another photographer!

Past topics have included: Battle Damage, Ultrawide Angle, All About the Love, Podcasts, What’s in your Bag (2018), Self-Improvement, Snapshots, Exposure Troubles, Street Photography (2017), Event Photography, Photographic Gifts, Film Photography (2017), Photographic Annoyances, Locations, Strange Habits, Collaboration, Buying Work, Silly Mistakes, Show and Tell, The Discomfort Zone, The Comfort Zone, Influence, Consistency, Inclement Weather, Stock Photography, Going Freelance, Photo Sharing, Photography Books, Creativity in Photography, Colour Photography, Black & White (2017), Critiques, Lenses, Blogging, Regrets, What’s in Your Bag (2017), Promotion, Random Questions, Photo Projects, Shooting Film, Photographic Buzz Words, Photographic Wins, Photographic Fails, Still Life, Portrait Photography, Automotive Photography (2017), Traveling With Gear, Photographic Quirks, Why is Photography Important (2017), Ethics (2017), Difficult Situations, Phone Photography, Web sites, Self-Improvement (2017), Personal Branding, Photographic Gifts, Brand Loyalties (2016), Location Scouting, Food Photography, The Good, The Bad, Photographic Slumps, Wedding Photography, Post-Processing, Digital Photography, Film Photography, Keeping It Simple, Photographic Fads, Regular Maintenance, Personal Vision, Travel, Snapshots, Extreme Weather, Sports Photography, Pet Peeves, Out of the Box, Portrait Photography, Infrared Photography, Good Practices, Landscape Photography, Photography as a Skill, Photography as an Art, Getting Noticed, Post-Processing, Film Processing, Instant Photography, Tripods, Pet Photography, Budget Photography, Nude Photography, Workflow, Vintage Gear, The 5 W’s, Going Pro, Importance of Photography, Filters, Photography & the Law, Editing Your Work, Travelling with Gear, Street Photography, Get Up and Go (Motivation), Photographic Goals (2016), Low-Light Photography, Photographic Dreams, Cold Weather, Naturally Artificial, LoFi Love, Product Photography, Chasing Light, Automotive Photography, Finding Inspiration, All About You, Landscapes, Shooting for Colour, Digital Video, Back to School Parts I and II, Self-Publishing, Keeping Calm, Photography & Zen, Camera Bags, Dealing with People, Printing Your Work, Adventure Photography, Camera Clubs, Fireworks Photography, Aircraft Photography, Architectural Photography, Photo meetups, Getting Rid of GAS, Keeping it Organized, Favourite Things, Photo Competitions, Biggest Challenges, Compact System Cameras, film vs. digital, landscape photography, seasonal photography, the basics of composition, what’s in your camera bag?, night photography, portrait photography, forced perspective photography, black and white photography, golden hour photography, macro photography, how photography has changed your life, to photoshop or not, motion photography, photojournalism, the best gifts for photographers in 2014, extreme weather photography, photographic aspirations, street photography, “why are you a photographer?”, improvisational lighting tactics, post-processing rituals, photographic blunders, getting paid, photographic triumphs, shooting hardship, photographic anxieties, quick thinking, making a difference, favorites, appropriation, brand loyalties, small photography, BIG photography, focus, photography in advertising, battle scars, sharing your photography, creative evolution, the inanimate subject, photo vs. video, emerging tech, teaching the craft, getting the shot, traveling with your camera, sweet gear deals, mobile lighting solutions, quelling frustrations, finding work, sensitive subjects, DIY projects, defamation, making and maintaining a website, in defense of photography, capturing action, post-processing, photo lingo, cold weather shooting, food photography, death in photography, film photography, famous photos, critiques, videography, user-generated content, composition, iPhoneography, standing up for yourself, blogging, workflow, the first time, candid portraiture, copyright and licensing, ethics, gear investments, inspiration, long shots, making it in the photo business, networking, night photography, perks of being a photographer, photographer stressors, photography philosophy, photography trends, picking your priorities, pricing, promoting yourself and your work, protecting your assets, self-improvement, odd photography, and travel.