I’m much more comfortable behind the lens of a still camera, 35mm, 120, even digital. But I wanted to try something new, and that was Super 8, yep the infamous home movie format that I’m sure many of my older readers have family movies tucked away in this format. Well Super 8 isn’t dead, my good friends at Kodak are still producing two types, Tri-X a B&W film and Ektachrome E100D, a colour film stock. Recently I was able to find a source for super 8 here in Ontario, West Camera on Queen Street in Toronto so I rushed around to find a Super 8Read More →

By the end of summer 1814, the jig was up for the American invasion. While they had managed to strike at the British and nearly pushed them off the Niagara peninsula again, the new commander-in-chief of the British forces in Upper Canada was going to have none of that. Following the quick movements, it all turned around at the Battle of Lundy’s Lane and General Drummond managed to push the Americans back to their beachhead at the now heavily fortified Fort Erie where the Americans had started not a month earlier. And Drummond would begin his siege that would lead up to one of theRead More →

It’s the week that all Instant Photographers look forward to, that week where we celebrate in our little (well not so little) obsession with Instant Film. ‘Roid Week. This year, I actually managed to get in photos for all five days (last year I made it only four…due to a camping trip on the Friday that took me away from my computer/scanner, not a bad thing overall). It was as always fun, a bit qwirky, and filled with strange stares from students and coworkers as I lugged these old cameras around and smiled as I tucked away Integral film from the Impossible Project, or peeledRead More →

My car wound its way along the dusty road deep in Ontario’s cottage country; I knew where I was going, but it was based on probably outdated satellite imagery and information from someone whom I didn’t trust. But as I was in the area I decided to take a chance. The gates to the old Seven Mile Island property were wide open inviting me to come in, not a sign of life as I drove along the narrow track road along the shores of the lake. Oddly enough it began to remind me of the old children’s novel “Gone Away Lake” which was a favouriteRead More →

When the Americans retreated across the river in December of 1813 they left nothing but a charred ruin of the town of Newark (Today‚Äôs Niagara-On-The-Lake) and Fort George. Left with no fortifications in the area, General Drummond immediately ordered the capture of Fort Niagara (which was a huge success) and the construction of new fortifications to defend the Canadian Side of the mouth of the Niagara River. Drummond, quick to realize that Fort George was too distant to command the river mouth ordered the new fort be constructed closer to Lake Ontario. Construction of the new Fort Mississauga commenced in spring of 1814. It consistedRead More →

Following a series of defeats that saw the surrender of three American Armies and the British in control of the entire Michigan Territory from Ohio to Mackinac Island, General Henry Dearborn needed a new plan, one that would not only boost the morale of his troops, but give Washington DC a swift victory that they had been expecting. It was again decided that a three-pronged assault would be enough to force the British retreat and surrender from Upper Canada. But it didn’t go exactly to plan. Dearborn believed the false report that 8,000 British Regulars garrisoned Kingston, home to the Royal Navy Squadron on LakeRead More →

The Battle of Stoney Creek is recognized by many as one of the engagements that saved Upper Canada. And they would be right, by the end of May 1813 the British Army having been defeated at the Battle of Fort George retreated from the Niagara frontier and established a new defensive post at Burlington Heights, fortifying a small farm that commanded a view of Burlington Bay. A network of Blockhouses and earthworks to hopefully hold any further American aggression before they could reach further into Upper Canada. In the later part of the 19th-Century, Dundurn Castle would be built over the ruins of the BritishRead More →

110 is back, the Film Photography Project predicted that 2012 would be the year of 110 film, and they were right. The format gained popularity through the 1970s when Kodak introduced the format based on the subminature 16mm format but in their own cartridge. My very first camera was a 110 camera that I used a grand totally of twice before it broke. So when all this hype about 110 was brewing through the FPP, I sort of shyed away from it. There are better formats in my mind. But still the question remained who would make the film? Sure FPP had found a stashRead More →

Fort Erie, if you’ve wondered where the Ontario border town got its name, you just have to take a wander just south of old Highway Three along Lakeshore Road. Standing near the edge of the Niagara River, in the shadow of Buffalo, New York stands a small stone fort. Fort Erie was the only pre-Jay Treaty Fort that the British operated out of during the Anglo-American War of 1812, but it was also the fort that changed hands the most and only saw completion while under American occupation at the end of the war. Today it stands as one of the bloodiest battlefields on CanadianRead More →

I had been putting on purchasing a flash unit for my two older Polaroid SX-70 cameras, but after hearing nothing but good things about them I decided to pick one up from Henry’s and give it a go. Designed by Mint, the flash is powered by 2 AAA batteries, and gives you a sleek modern look with the same feel as the old 10 flash bar unit that was originally offered. I have to say, I was very impressed with the unit, works on both my Rainbow Box OneStep, and my two folding SX-70s (an original model and a Sonar OneStep). It fired off everyRead More →