Category: 52:320TXP

The 2014 “52” Project, where I explore the wonders that is 4×5 photography using the classic Kodak Tri-X Pan.

52:320TXP – Week 42 – The Battle

52:320TXP – Week 42 – The Battle

52:320TXP - Week 42 - The Battle

You don’t see a big battle, you hear it.

A 4×5 camera isn’t exact the best camera to capture a military reenactment, but I figured what the heck! Now usually at an event like this I’m out on the field shooting a musket rather than a camera, but when I woke up on the Sunday at the Mississinawa 2014 War of 1812 event and put weight on my ankle, it really wasn’t up to any sort of heavy activity that often accompanies such an event. So I ended up taking photos instead. I setup the camera, focused, metered, loaded the film and waited. And the Sunday morning was fantastic for photos as the smoke just hung on the field from the cannon and small arms fire. I had hopped to catch a bit more movement, but the sun was super bright and event pulling the film and stopping it all the way down, failed to get the effect I was hoping for. Maybe an ND filter would’ve helped.

Pacemaker Crown Graphic – Fuji Fujinon-W 1:56/125 – Kodak Tri-X Pan (320TXP)
Meter: Sektonic L-358
1/4″ – f/64 – ASA-200
Kodak HC-110 Dil. E 6:30 @ 20C

52:320TXP – Week 41 – Whitechurch

52:320TXP – Week 41 – Whitechurch

52:320TXP - Week 41 - Whitechurch

Keeping it nice and simple for this week, a simple white clapboard church along my way too and from work. The Church of Christ in Omagh, Ontario is one of the oldest churches in the area, and has always caught my eye, mostly for it’s simplicity. If you go into the town of Milton proper along the main street are three rather ornate churches including my own home church, but this one made a great subject to shoot right from the hip, yep, sporting the Crown Graphic as it was designed to be shot…handheld.

Pacemaker Crown Graphic – Fuji Fujinon-W 1:5.6/125 – Kodak Tri-X Pan (320TXP)
Meter: Pentax Spotmeter V
1/125″ – f/11 – ASA-320
Kodak TMax Developer (1+4) 8:00 @ 20C

52:320TXP – Week 40 – The Bunker

52:320TXP – Week 40 – The Bunker

52:320TXP - Week 40 - The Bunker

The Iron Curtain, The Red Scare, Nuclear War, Ruskies, Commies, Berlin Wall, Spies…Sounding Familiar? Even Canada was affected, so much so that our Prime Minister at the time, John Diefenbaker ordered the construction of a series of bunkers that would house the civilian government in the event of Nuclear War, they were collectively known as Diefenbunkers. Only one got completed, and in 1962 Canadian Forces Station Carp went online. The other 49 were either not finished or partially completed. When the cold war ended in 1994 with the collapse of the Soviet Union the station was decommissioned, it reopened in 1998 as a Museum and is open today for public tours to teach about Canada’s involvement in the Cold War. Pictured (sort of) is the entrance blast tunnel, the actual bunker entrance is several meters down. However the meter I selected is I think, on the way out so it’s really just the lights, but still gives a creepy look eh? The Bunker is well worth a visit if you’re in the area or passing through to and from Ottawa, check out their website: diefenbunker.ca/!

Pacemaker Crown Graphic – Schneider-Kruzenack Angulon 1:6,8/90 – Kodak Tri-X Pan (320TXP)
Meter: Gossen Pilot
1″ – f/32 – ASA-800
Kodak Xtol (1+1) 9:45 @ 20C

52:320TXP – Week 39 – Seats of Power

52:320TXP – Week 39 – Seats of Power

52:320TXP - Week 39 - Seats of Power

Parliament Hill standing tall above the rush of the Ottawa River. While many a photographer would choose to shoot this building head on from the front, it took me a bit to find a proper vantage point from my favourite angle, the one that faces the Ottawa River mostly so that you can get a glimpse of the Library of Parliament, that round conical structure. My first choice was from across the River in the park surrounding the Museum of Canadian History (Museum of Civilization), but that wasn’t it, okay well how about in the heights on Nepean Point…so I lugged the gear across the bridge, up the hill and no still wasn’t what I was looking for. Finally the little observation point just on the Ontario side of the Alexandria Point Bridge, and there it was. My camera actually ended up being a little bit of a tourist attraction with several people posing with it pretending to use it and the such. Now the Centre Block for the most part is not original! The original structure completed in 1876 (construction started in 1859) was slightly different, specifically the tower at the front. This building, save the Library, was destroyed in a fire in 1916. The new Building seen today was completed in 1919, and the Peace Tower was completed in 1927. The Library was saved by the swift actions of the librarian at the time in closing the metal doors protecting the Library. I’d also like to introduce the latest addition to my Large format kit the Schneider-Kreuznack Symmar-S 1:5.6/210! While I still have my wonderful Kodak Ektar 203mm lens this gives me a modern portrait lens with a PC sync socket to use off camera flash units.

Pacemaker Crown Graphic – Schneider-Kreuznack Symmar-S 1:5.6/210 – Kodak Tri-X Pan (320TXP)
Meter: Pentax Spotmeter V
1/4″ – f/45 – ASA-320
Kodak Xtol (1+1) 8:30 @ 20C

52:320TXP – Week 38 – The Starfighter

52:320TXP – Week 38 – The Starfighter

52:320TXP - Week 38 - The Starfighter

The Cold War was an interesting period of history, and one of my favourites. Cloak and Dagger affairs, Nuclear Weapons, Spies, Jets, and the such. The CF-104 Starfighter is my second favourite jet of the era, the first being the doomed Avro CF-105 Arrow. But the Starfighter was unique, wildly different from jets of the day and had some rather unique nicknames such as the Aluminium Death Tube, The Lawn Dart, and The Flying Phallus. But it certainly cuts a unique figure. Like the CF-86 Sabre before it, the CF-104 was built by Canadair under licence using the Lockheed F-104G as a template. These would make up Canada’s lead nuclear strike force based in Europe and would fly retaliatory strike missions against Soviet Bloc nations. Thankfully that never happened. While this isn’t exactly the photo I wanted to take, it was raining fairly hard so I kept myself and my camera under the cover of the Museum entrance. This CF-104 stands outside one of my favourite museums in the area, the Canadian Warplane Heritage Museum at the Hamilton International Airport in Mount Hope, Ontario. The museum itself is certainly worth a visit if you have a morning or afternoon to kill. The CF-104, along with the CF-101 Voodoo and CF-5 Freedom Fighter were all replaced in the mid-1980s with our current fighter, the CF-18 Hornet. On a final note, when the RCAF was looking for a replacement to the CF-86, one of the planes they were looking at was the F-105 Thunderchief, but they would have equipped it with the awesome Orenda Iroquois Engine that had been developed for the Arrow…that would’ve been a sight to see.

Pacemaker Crown Graphic – Schneider-Kreuznack Angulon 1:6,8/90 – Kodak Tri-X Pan (320TXP)
Meter: Pentax Spotmeter V
1/30″ – f/32 – ASA-400
Kodak TMax Developer (1+9) 10:30 @ 20C

52:320TXP – Week 37 – The Stone House

52:320TXP – Week 37 – The Stone House

52:320TXP - Week 37 - The Stone House

The weather at the beginning of Week 37 wasn’t too bad, but as the week progressed it slowly got worse. And I kept on putting off loading up a film holder to get a shot. One of the joys of having a proper press camera is the ability to shoot it handheld. So here is yet another rural farmhouse from the area surrounding Milton. Another one that has always caught my eye, simple and elegant.

Pacemaker Crown Graphic – Fuji Fujinon-W 1:5.6/125 – Kodak Tri-X Pan (320TXP)
Meter: Pentax Spotmeter V
1/125 – f/16 – ASA-400
Kodak TMax Developer (1+9) 10:30 @ 20C

52:320TXP – Week 36 – The Castle

52:320TXP – Week 36 – The Castle

52:320TXP - Week 36 - The Castle

Well it’s not really a castle in any sense of the word, but this 1726 building in Old Fort Niagara has earned the moniker “The French Castle.” Constructed as part of the second fortifications at the mouth of the Niagara, the French first came to the region in 1678. However due to illness and lack of supplies the site was abandoned. The current fortifications on site date to 1726 as has remained occupied since. The British took the fort in a siege in 1759 during the French-Indian War (Seven Years War), it continued to remain a British stronghold through the American Revolution, but was turned over to the Americans in 1796. Captured again by the British in a surprise attack in 1813 in response to the American Burning of what is today Niagara-On-The-Lake. It was again returned to the Americans following the war. The site is unique in the fact that it blends the style and construction of three different eras, from the early 18th Century French, late 18th British, and Late 19th American. The fort and grounds around it has seen all the major conflicts that came to North America, and today stands as the longest continually occupied Military post in North America, while the Army occupation ended after the Korean Conflict, the US Coast Guard maintains a detachment. Every Labour Day the fort holds their annual War of 1812 Garrison, an event I’ve had the pleasure of attending twice, which honours the 1813 capture of the fort (which actually happened in December, but no one really wants to camp/reenact at that time of year, although we did do it once last year, to the day and even to the hour)

Pacemaker Crown Graphic – Schneider-Kreuznack Angulon 1:6,8/90 – Kodak Tri-X Pan (320TXP)
Meter: Pentax Spotmeter V
1/2″ – f/32 – ASA-250
Kodak Xtol (1+1) 7:45 @ 20C

52:320TXP – Week 35 – Expeditionary Force

52:320TXP – Week 35 – Expeditionary Force

52:320TXP - Week 35 - Expeditionary Force

We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields.

While I continue to push my War of 1812 project, there is another major milestone that’s happening right now, the Centennial Celebrations of the First World War. So I wasn’t going to let it slide in the sheet-a-week project, so when I attended a timeline event (where a bunch of reenactors from various time periods gather to show their stuff to the public) at Fort George National Historic Site in Niagara-On-The-Lake, Ontario I made a point to find a group of reenactors from the World War One period. I found some, they are part of the Canadian Great War Society and were more than happy to pose along with one of their horses for a photo. These represent a typical enlisted solider in the Canadian Expeditionary Force, a destinct service branch that served during the war in several major battles including Ypres, Somme, Vimy Ridge, and Passchendaele. By the time the force was disbanded in 1918 some 60,661 men had lost their lives.

Pacemaker Crown Graphic – Fuji Fujinon-W 1:5.6/125 – Kodak Tri-X Pan (320TXP)
Meter: Sektonic L-358
1/30″ – f/22 – ASA-320
Kodak Xtol (1+1) 8:30 @ 20C

52:320TXP – Week 34 – Mount Carmel

52:320TXP – Week 34 – Mount Carmel

52:320TXP - Week 34 - Mount Carmel

Located well above the tourist trap that is Clifton Hill by Niagara Falls sits a lovely spiritual retreat, named after a rather well known mountain that is in Israel and features prominently in the story of the prophet Elijah, namely the contest he challenges the prophets of Ba’al to in the Book of Kings. I came across the retreat while looking for a spot to park my car as I was planning on a bit of light trespassing at a historic transformer station located just down the road. Also this was the very first sheet of film I shot with my new-to-me Pacemaker Crown Graphic, I know, taking a risk, but the camera’s in mint condition and the lens checked out on all shutter speeds. However I left all my lightmeters at home (stoops!) and ended up having to use an application on my iPhone, which decided to meter on the trees rather than the building itself. But despite that I still kinda like it!

Pacemaker Crown Graphic – Schneider-Kreuznack Xenar 1:4,7/135 – Kodak Tri-X Pan (320TXP)
Meter: iPhone 4
1/4″ – f/22 – ASA-320
Kodak HC-110 Dil. B 5:30 @ 20C

52:320TXP – Week 33 – The Encampment

52:320TXP – Week 33 – The Encampment

52:320TXP - Week 33 - The Encampment

It ended with an explosion, but this is how it started, the sun creeping up over the historic fort, the trees, earthworks, masonry redoubts and blockhouses, tangled abatis, and rows of white tents. This was the scene early Saturday morning as near 1100 military reenactors started to crawl out of their tents and start to put on their uniforms, ready to put on a show the likes the site, or the neighborhood had ever seen. You see this year marks the 200th anniversary of the bloody siege of Fort Erie, the last major campaign on Canadian soil during the War of 1812. Sure there was still Plattsburg, Cooks Mills, Bladensburg, Washington DC, and the Defense of Fort McHenry still in store for the 1814 campaign. By the end of the day, the British line had 300 reenactors, while there were a near equal number of American forces occupying the fort. How did it end? A big explosion and then chaos and the reenactors, at least those still standing, broke and ran. And we retired back to our tents again.

This is also the last week for my trusty, although getting rather old Speed Graphic, the light leak in the Graphic back is getting worse by the day, and the bellows are starting to come undone. However, I did recently get a mint condition Crown Graphic which will be making a debut for Week 34!

Modified Anniversary Speed Graphic – Schneider-Kreuznack Angulon 1:6,8/90 (Orange-22) – Kodak Tri-X Pan (320TXP)
Meter: Pentax Spotmeter V
1/25″ – f/32 – ASA-200
Kodak Xtol (1+1) 12:00 @ 20C