Category: 400TX:365

The 2013 52-roll project. During this project I have decided to limit myself in several areas. 1) I will only use my Nikon F3 with the AI-S Nikkor 50mm 1:1.4 lens. I will only use Kodak Tri-X 400 and develop it in HC-110 Dilution B. Should make for an interesting year.

400TX:365 – Week 43 – Ringwood Manor

400TX:365 – Week 43 – Ringwood Manor

It was thanks to all the beautiful images that Michael Raso, Leslie Lazenby, and Mat Marash have posted from the Ringwood State Park that drove me to visit the place while I was in the area. While this is only the section of the state park surrounding the Ringwood Manor itself, I would eventually go and visit the other sections and historic structures in the whole park. The manor was home to many iron workers from the 1740s and well into the 19th century. Ringwood Iron was used in the great chain that was laid across the Hudson River during the American Revolution, as well as tools for Washington’s Army. The current Manor home was constructed in 1807. The forges continued operation even through the War of 1812, producing cannon shot for the American army. The area became a National Historic Landmark in 1966, and there is still a fully functioning coal fired forge that is operated from time to time. On a more technical note, I’m pleased to welcome back the original project camera, the Nikon F3, which had issues back in February was sent in for service with Nikon, however they had a hard time finding some parts but it was returned! This week I also pulled the Tri-X one stop to ASA-200 and developed in HC-110 Dilution E, and I love the results!

400TX:365 - Week 43 - Ringwood Manor

400TX:365 - Week 43 - Ringwood Manor

400TX:365 - Week 43 - Ringwood Manor

400TX:365 - Week 43 - Ringwood Manor

400TX:365 - Week 43 - Ringwood Manor

400TX:365 - Week 43 - Ringwood Manor

400TX:365 - Week 43 - Ringwood Manor

400TX:365 – Week 42 – Something’s Brewing

400TX:365 – Week 42 – Something’s Brewing

Week 42 is for those 21 years of age or older. Many will associate Cooperstown, NY with baseball, and while yes the town is home to the Baseball Hall of Fame, it also holds something for fans of craft beer and other alcoholic drinks. The Cooperstown Beverage Tour is a route of six stops featuring three breweries, two wineries, and a cider mill. So why not combine two loves of mine, beer and photography. While the wineries held no interest for me, I cut down the route to four locations, sadly I only had time to visit three of them as by the time I got to the last stop it was already closed for the night. My first stop was the Butternuts Beer & Ale Brewery, while the location was closed for tours, the employee who did my tasting session, let me poke my head into the main plant, but really the best part of the first location was the label art and beer names, like Moo Thunder. They also had a wonderful Pumpkin Ale, which usually isn’t my thing, but this one was awesome. Next up was the Fly Creek Cider Mill, this was the only real family friendly spot along the way. They still work with equipment that dates back to the early 20th and late 19th century, and had lots of samples of their cheeses, apple cider (both alcoholic and non-alcoholic), and wines. They also make a fantastic mac ‘n cheese. The crowning stop on the whole tour for me was Brewery Ommegang, brewing beer in the traditional way they have a wonderful and big lineup of some fantastic beers. Ommegang I actually got the tour the whole facility, even the packaging area that had been shut down for the night. Then into the tasting, which featured six beers, not to mention a huge line up of snacks and various dips that they produced in association with local producers. My final stop however, the Cooperstown Brewery, had to be cancelled as it was already 5:30pm and they were closed, plus I still had to get to Albany and the sun was finally setting over the catskills. Another day of seeing both the sunrise and set from the seat of my trusty car. I again decided to push the film one stop and expose it at ASA-800 and used HC-110 Dilution A to develop the film. I really like the look!

400TX:365 - Week 42 - Something's Brewing

400TX:365 - Week 42 - Something's Brewing

400TX:365 - Week 42 - Something's Brewing

400TX:365 - Week 42 - Something's Brewing

400TX:365 - Week 42 - Something's Brewing

400TX:365 - Week 42 - Something's Brewing

400TX:365 - Week 42 - Something's Brewing

400TX:365 – Week 41 – Just Drive

400TX:365 – Week 41 – Just Drive

I love to drive. Either going some place directly, or just for the sake of taking a new or different road to find something new to shoot. This particular trip was driving just for the sake of driving. And I found a lot of cool stuff to photograph along the way! This was the second week working with HC-110 under Dilution F, the grain is okay, I didn’t really see anything reducing it using a higher dilution. Maybe when I work with Dilution E and pulling the film in a later week, I’ll see better results.

400TX:365 - Week 41 - Just Drive

400TX:365 - Week 41 - Just Drive

400TX:365 - Week 41 - Just Drive

400TX:365 - Week 41 - Just Drive

400TX:365 - Week 41 - Just Drive

400TX:365 - Week 41 - Just Drive

400TX:365 - Week 41 - Just Drive

400TX:365 – Week 40 – The New York Thirty-One

400TX:365 – Week 40 – The New York Thirty-One

I’m rather fond of Rochester, New York, and really it’s not that far of a drive for me, about two and a half hours. Now in the past I’ve usually taken the I-90 in, but really the Interstate is a bit boring so I decided to switch up my route a little this time and take NY-31 from Lewiston to Rochester. And what a great drive it was! Passed through several great little towns with that wonderful late 19th early 20th century downtown buildings just starting to wake up to their Saturday. Open farm fields, lots of things to look at along the way with my music playing and the window down. I also decided to swap out the dilution this time around, opting for Dilution F, which brought the development time up to 15 minutes, but it helped smooth out the grain. I think I will continue to work with different dilutions to spice things up.

400TX:365 - Week 40 - NY-31

400TX:365 - Week 40 - NY-31

400TX:365 - Week 40 - NY-31

400TX:365 - Week 40 - NY-31

400TX:365 - Week 40 - NY-31

400TX:365 - Week 40 - NY-31

400TX:365 - Week 40 - NY-31

400TX:365 – Week 39 – Queenston

400TX:365 – Week 39 – Queenston

The lovely village of Queenston tucked away on the shores of the Niagara River, just below the Niagara Parkway and hidden in the shadow of the mighty heights. Although small, the village is no stranger to the stage of history. Almost 201 years ago it was the sight of an American invasion during the War of 1812, that saw the actions of General Isaac Brock and General Sheaffe drive away the invading force, and saw the death of Brock, in fact Brock and his Aide-Du-Campe are buried up on the Heights beneath the tallest military monuments in Canada. The Village was again occupied by American troops from may to june 1813, during this time, resident Laura Secord overheard plans to take out the brazen Lt. James FitzGibbon and his detachment of 49th Regiment at Beaver Dams, the proceeded to walk through occupied territory to warn the British Officer. Her message along with Native scouts allowed FitzGibbon to turn the tables on the American troops and get them to surrender. Queenston was also home to the Colonial Advocate in early 1824, the newspaper of William Lyon Mackenzie. When the paper moved to York (Toronto), Mackenzie would go on to serve the new city of Toronto as mayor, and eventually lead open rebellion against the government in 1837, a rebellion that was stopped by the actions of James FitzGibbon. The village is also home to the unique Willowbank School for the Restoration Arts. This school is dedicated to teaching the craft of historic restoration, and is located in the Willowbank Mansion, itself a school and project to restore this national historic site. You can tour Mackenzie’s print house, the Secord Homestead (which was restored by the Chocolate company that bears Laura’s name), Willowbank is also available for tours on appointment, or you can attend seminars there. At the Heights you can climb to the top of Brock’s Monument and have a commanding view of the Niagara Peninsula.

400TX:365 - Week 39 - Queenston

400TX:365 - Week 39 - Queenston

400TX:365 - Week 39 - Queenston

400TX:365 - Week 39 - Queenston

400TX:365 - Week 39 - Queenston

400TX:365 - Week 39 - Queenston

400TX:365 - Week 39 - Queenston

400TX:365 – Week 38 – Lines

400TX:365 – Week 38 – Lines

Oh Hey, my name is Alex and I’m diving into a little bit of cliche conceptual work. Lines. No, not a line study, just taking picture of various lines that I happen to see.

Yeah, it was kinda boring. Don’t worry better stuff is coming up for the next several weeks as we move into the home stretch! Only 14 weeks left!

400TX:365 - Week 38 - Lines

400TX:365 - Week 38 - Lines

400TX:365 - Week 38 - Lines

400TX:365 - Week 38 - Lines

400TX:365 - Week 38 - Lines

400TX:365 - Week 38 - Lines

400TX:365 - Week 38 - Lines

400TX:365 – Week 37 – Real People are More Interesting

400TX:365 – Week 37 – Real People are More Interesting

Rain and the Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF) wasn’t going to stop week 37 as I went into the city to run some errands. I soon found myself in the middle of massive crowds. So I turned my camera onto the people waiting in line. Until of course one of the volunteers for TIFF asked me “Why are you taking a picture of me with all these celebrities around?” “Real People are more interesting.” that gave her a good chuckle. Unlike many other street photographers I enjoy engaging my subjects, trying to catch a smile, or a notice of my lens trained on them, often I’ll get more looks for contempt or a ‘what are you doing’ shooting my way, but I press the shutter anyways and tempt fate. Most people in the end really don’t mind.

400TX:365 - Week 37 - Real People are More Interesting

400TX:365 - Week 37 - Real People are More Interesting

400TX:365 - Week 37 - Real People are More Interesting

400TX:365 - Week 37 - Real People are More Interesting

400TX:365 - Week 37 - Real People are More Interesting

400TX:365 - Week 37 - Real People are More Interesting

week37 - fm2 - 400tx - 013

400TX:365 – Week 36 – No Theme

400TX:365 – Week 36 – No Theme

Start of term at work really kicked my butt so I’m back into catch up mode, but don’t worry, the film is still being shot! So for Week 36 I went for a no theme, and this time to make it a little more interesting I threw a green filter onto the lens and pulled the film one stop to ASA-200. I wasn’t particularly pleased with the results, but managed to find seven images!

400TX:365 - Week 36 - No Theme

400TX:365 - Week 36 - No Theme

400TX:365 - Week 36 - No Theme

400TX:365 - Week 36 - No Theme

400TX:365 - Week 36 - No Theme

400TX:365 - Week 36 - No Theme

400TX:365 - Week 36 - No Theme

400TX:365 – Week 35 – Niagara-On-The-Lake

400TX:365 – Week 35 – Niagara-On-The-Lake

Established around 1781 as Butlerburg, named after Col. John Butler, the commander of the British Irregular unit known as Butler’s Rangers who fought during the American Revolution. The settlement was renamed West Niagara (as it was west of Fort Niagara), then Newark when the town became the capital of Upper Canada in 1792 by John Graves Simcoe. After the capital was moved to the new town of York in 1797 the town was named Niagara a year later. The town was invaded and occupied by American troops from May 1813 to December that year. When they left American forces along with a unit known as the Canadian Volunteers burned the town to the ground in an effort to afford the approaching British Army no quarter, and to turn the general populous against the British. This had the exact opposite effect, galvanizing support for the British, who in turned crossed the river, captured Fort Niagara, and burned everything from Youngstown to Buffalo. The town was quick to rebuild. The name Niagara-on-the-Lake was adopted in 1880, but wasn’t officially recognized until 1970. Today the quiet main streets are filled with quaint shops, restaurants, and tourists…lots of tourists. The town is home to several historic sites such as Fort George, Fort Mississauga, the oldest public golf course in Canada, and Butler’s Barracks. If you’re a fan of the theater, the town is home to the famous Shaw Festival. Also make sure to stop off for some Punishment ice cream while you’re in town.

400TX:365 - Week 35 - Niagara-On-The-Lake

400TX:365 - Week 35 - Niagara-On-The-Lake

400TX:365 - Week 35 - Niagara-On-The-Lake

400TX:365 - Week 35 - Niagara-On-The-Lake

400TX:365 - Week 35 - Niagara-On-The-Lake

400TX:365 - Week 35 - Niagara-On-The-Lake

400TX:365 - Week 35 - Niagara-On-The-Lake

400TX:365 – Week 34 – Milton’s Ribfest

400TX:365 – Week 34 – Milton’s Ribfest

Vegetarians may want to look away for this one…there are large amounts of meat in this post. The Milton Ribfest is a celebration of BBQ and Beer two great things about summer. So having spent the day earlier driving around backroads I decided to give myself a treat for dinner and hit up the Milton Rib and Craft Beer Festival. I ended up going to the Kentucky Smoke House for my pulled pork sandwich and then sampling the fine craft breweries from Ontario such as Flying Monkey’s, Amsterdam, Lake of Bays, and many more. Needless to say I shot my roll before I hit the beer, and then being a responsible citizen, walked home.

400TX:365 - Week 34 - Milton's Ribfest

400TX:365 - Week 34 - Milton's Ribfest

400TX:365 - Week 34 - Milton's Ribfest

400TX:365 - Week 34 - Milton's Ribfest

400TX:365 - Week 34 - Milton's Ribfest

400TX:365 - Week 34 - Milton's Ribfest

400TX:365 - Week 34 - Milton's Ribfest