Category: Classic Camera Revival – Podcast

Show Notes for the Classic Camera Revival Podcast

Classic Camera Revival – Episode 40 – Screw Mounts and Screw Ups

Classic Camera Revival – Episode 40 – Screw Mounts and Screw Ups

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One of the oldest lens mounting technologies is surprisingly simple, a thread. Leica would be the first with the Leica Thread Mount or M39 as it became known in the 1930s with the Leica I (C), in the 1940s Zeiss Ikon would put forward a much larger diameter thread mount, known as the M42. The camera would be the Contax S and marked the start of the modern SLR. Eventually, the M42 mount would take on additional names like Universal screw mount, Pentax screw mount, and Praktica screw mount. In this episode, the gang takes on some of their favourite screw mount cameras.

Cameras Featured
The following cameras were featured on today’s episode.

KMZ Zenit E – The only Soviet era camera that Alex actually likes and the first camera of James. The Zenit E is a basic, no-nonsense SLR with a Selenium Light Meter (UnCoupled). While these aren’t the best cameras out there, and finding ones with working shutters are getting rare. But if you do find one that works, you’ll have a decently built Russian camera. And if the camera doesn’t work, you might just have a rear lens cap for the iconic Helios 44.

Make: KMZ
Model: Zenit E
Type: Single Lens Reflex
Format: 135 (35mm), 36x24mm
Lens: Interchangeable, M42 Mount
Year of Manufacture: 1965-8

Classic Camera Revival - Episode 40 - Screw Mounts and ScrewupsCCR Review 60 - KMZ Zenit ECCR Review 60 - KMZ Zenit ECCR Review 60 - KMZ Zenit E

Yashica YF – The YF is the Leica for those who don’t like Leica cameras. Based on the Nicca 3L, took everything good about the Barnack Leicas and the Leica M3 and put together a sweet little bottom load rangefinder that can be had for less than a thousand with a lens. While on the rare side, if you do come across one, and are in the market, totally worth the money to pick it up.

Make: Yashica
Model: YF
Type: Rangefinder
Format: 35mm, 36x24mm
Lens: Interchangeable, Leica Thread Mount (LTM/M39)
Year of Manufacture: 1959

Classic Camera Revival - Episode 40 - Screw Mounts and ScrewupsCCR Review 86 - Yashica YFCCR Review 86 - Yashica YFCCR Review 86 - Yashica YF

Canon P – While not a new camera for the show, Bill’s P having been previously owned by John, is another Leica alternative. The P or Populaire is a wonderful mechanical rangefinder that has a yes, full open backloading. Not to mention some amazing Canon M39 glass to complement. Unlike the Canon 7, there’s no meter on the P, but that shouldn’t stop you! For Bill, this is a great little camera to carry around when you don’t want to lug everything plus the kitchen sink.

Make: Canon
Model: Populaire or P
Type: Rangefinder
Format: 35mm, 36x24mm
Lens: Interchangeable, Leica Thread Mount (LTM/M39)
Year of Manufacture: 1958-61

Classic Camera Revival - Episode 40 - Screw Mounts and ScrewupsHNR BuildingNorthbound Train in the Rosdale Subway StationThe Senator Restaurant In Colour

Yashica TL-Electro – When it comes to first cameras, you’re going to have to pry this one from John’s cold-dead hands. Purchased as a teenager with the help of his parents he doesn’t use the camera as often as he did, but he isn’t getting rid of it any time soon. Plus with the ability to use Zeiss glass on it, who can blame him!

Make: Yashica
Model: TL-Electro
Type: Single Lens Reflex
Format: 35mm, 36x24mm
Lens: Interchangeable, M42
Year of Manufacture: 1972

Classic Camera Revival - Episode 40 - Screw Mounts and ScrewupsScan-100912-0002Jays at Exhibition Stadium, 1980's

Praktica L2 – We’re back in the Soviet Block again with Mike’s L2, not the best camera on the market, and there are plenty of flaws with it such as over advancing the film. But in the end, you might end up with a sweet lens on the front of it that you can use on another camera.

Make: Praktica
Model: L2
Type: Single Lens Reflex
Format: 35mm, 36x24mm
Lens: Interchangeable, M42
Year of Manufacture: 1970s (approx)

Classic Camera Revival - Episode 40 - Screw Mounts and ScrewupsThe Artist's HandPraktica RIAD03202013 - Frame 06

Voitlander Bessa R – Trevor now has regrets getting rid of this extremely modern rangefinder, and the Bessa R is a true modern LTM rangefinder, metered, and having the ablity to use any M39/LTM lens, if you have one, never let it go, if you find one at a bargain, get it!

Make: Cosina
Model: Voigtlander Bessa R
Type: Rangefinder
Format: 35mm, 36x24mm
Lens: Interchangeable, M39
Year of Manufacture: 2000

Screw Ups
Shooting Film has a way of keeping you humble and never letting you forget your mistakes. And goodness knows we have done a lot of them. From developing in Fix, or Fixing in another Developer. Forgetting what film we had loaded and shooting Ektar 100 at 400. Mis-Developing, forgetting to close the lens before pulling the darkslide. Not stopping down when firing the shutter, double exposing sheets, not cleaning up developing tanks. Thankfully in some cases, we get some fun results, the other times it’s just another learning experience.

Looking for a good spot to get your gear and material fix check out Burlington Camera (Burlington, ON), Downtown Camera (Toronto, ON), Film Plus (Toronto, ON), Belle Arte Camera (Hamilton, ON), Pond’s FotoSource (Guleph, ON), Foto Art Camera (Owen Sound, ON). Out West there’s The Camera Store (Calgary, AB) and Beau Photo Supply (Vancouver, BC). Additionally you can order online at Argentix (Quebec), buyfilm.ca (Ontario), the Film Photography Project or Freestyle Photographic.

Also you can connect with us through email: classiccamerarevivial[at]gmail[dot]com or by Facebook, we’re at Classic Camera Revival or even Twitter @ccamerarevival

Classic Camera Revival – Episode 39 – Tales from the Digital Age

Classic Camera Revival – Episode 39 – Tales from the Digital Age

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We’ve had a lot of experiences out in this digital world with our film cameras so we all sit down to share some of the more interesting stories of what we’ve experienced out there. And we’re not just talking about the age-old “Can you still get film for that” question. But run-ins with the law, security, great conversations, strange questions, and so much more. So sit down, take a listen, and let us know in the comments of any stories you have!

Looking for a good spot to get your gear and material fix check out Burlington Camera (Burlington, ON), Downtown Camera (Toronto, ON), Film Plus (Toronto, ON), Belle Arte Camera (Hamilton, ON), Pond’s FotoSource (Guleph, ON), Foto Art Camera (Owen Sound, ON). Out West there’s The Camera Store (Calgary, AB) and Beau Photo Supply (Vancouver, BC). Additionally you can order online at Argentix (Quebec), buyfilm.ca (Ontario), the Film Photography Project or Freestyle Photographic.

Also you can connect with us through email: classiccamerarevivial[at]gmail[dot]com or by Facebook, we’re at Classic Camera Revival or even Twitter @ccamerarevival

Classic Camera Revival – Episode 38 – Consumer Grade

Classic Camera Revival – Episode 38 – Consumer Grade

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Today we talk about those great little cameras that may not hit the professional mark, but instead take on a more plastic approach. That’s right we’re talking consumer cameras this episode we also have a great new film stock to talk about, that’s right the first film out of Kosmo Foto, Mono 100!

Cameras in Today’s Show…

Nikon F90
Don’t let this camera fool you, the Nikon F90 is a solid piece of engineering often overshadowed by the Nikon F4, but for John and Alex, it is their camera of choice when they want an SLR, without having to carry around a massive camera.

CCR Review 41 - Nikon F90

Make: Nikon
Model: F90
Type: Single Lens Reflex
Format: 35mm, 24×35
Lens: Interchangeable, Nikon F-Mount
Year of Manufacture: 1992-2001

Minolta X700
A classic Minolta camera and one that is well liked around the table. One of the first Minolta cameras to offer full program mode and with a large range of lenses to back it up is certainly a worthy addition to any Minolta collection.

CCR - Review 34 - Minolta X-700

Make: Minolta
Model: X-700
Type: Single Lens Reflex
Format: 35mm, 24×35
Lens: Interchangeable, Minolta MD Mount
Year of Manufacture: 1981

Canon Elan II
Like the F90, the Elan II may be consumer grade but it certainly has the quality and features of a pro camera, and for Mike, it is his choice in solid cameras that don’t cry over if something happens.

Make: Canon
Model: EOS Elan II/EOS 50
Type: Single Lens Reflex
Format: 35mm, 24×35
Lens: Interchangeable, Canon EF Mount
Year of Manufacture: 1995

Eos ELAN II

Canon Rebel Ti
Don’t get this camera confused with a digital camera, it was 35mm first and for Donna a great way to crack into the 35mm film market as it’s pretty similar to the digital SLR of the same name.

Make: Canon
Model: EOS Rebel Ti/EOS 300V
Type: Single Lens Reflex
Format: 35mm, 24×35
Lens: Interchangeable, Canon EF Mount
Year of Manufacture: 2001

Canon EOS Rebel Ti

Kosmo Foto Mono 100

CCR:FRB - Review 01 - Kosmo Foto Mono 100

If there’s one thing we’re seeing in 2018 is that film is back and new film stocks are starting to make it to market. But the one that has us rather excited is Kosmo Foto’s Mono 100. This fantastic B&W ASA-100 film looks beautiful in almost any developer you soup it in, but the one developer both Alex and Bill agree on is Blazinal 1:50 for 7.5 minutes or Kodak D-76 1:1. Plus who doesn’t like the amazing space-age packaging!

End of the LineDowntown DundasCCR:FRB - Review 01 - Kosmo Foto Mono 100 - Roll 02 (Kodak D-76)CCR:FRB - Review 01 - Kosmo Foto Mono 100 - Roll 02 (Kodak D-76)

You can read more about Alex and Bill’s adventures with Mono 100 over on the Kosmo Foto Page. Just click the names!

Looking for a good spot to get your gear and material fix check out Burlington Camera (Burlington, ON), Downtown Camera (Toronto, ON), Film Plus (Toronto, ON), Belle Arte Camera (Hamilton, ON), Pond’s FotoSource (Guleph, ON), Foto Art Camera (Owen Sound, ON). Out West there’s The Camera Store (Calgary, AB) and Beau Photo Supply (Vancouver, BC). Additionally you can order online at Argentix (Quebec), buyfilm.ca (Ontario), the Film Photography Project or Freestyle Photographic.

Also you can connect with us through email: classiccamerarevivial[at]gmail[dot]com or by Facebook, we’re at Classic Camera Revival or even Twitter @ccamerarevival

Classic Camera Revival – Episode 37 – Baby It’s Cold Outside

Classic Camera Revival – Episode 37 – Baby It’s Cold Outside

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We’re in the midst of a cold snap here in Ontario but that’s no reason to always stay inside. So the gang brings up their best and worst choices for cameras out in the cold weather! We also discuss the weird things we do to film in shooting and processing.

Cold Weather Cameras – The Best
What are our cameras of choice when out in the cold? Well everyone has a different approach to why they pick certain cameras when heading out for some cold weather shooting.

Mamiya m645 – When it comes to usability outside, a camera that relies on a battery and electronics may not be the best choice. But to Alex, part of usability in the winter includes the ability to use the cameras with gloves on. And with the m645 being a professional workhorse, it’s large controls makes it easy to operate even with mittens on! Plus he’s never had an issue operating the camera even in close to -30C weather over the Christmas holidays.

CCR Review 78 - Mamiya m645

Camera Specs
Make: Mamiya
Model: m645
Type: Single Lens Reflex
Format: Medium Format, 120/220, 6×4.5
Lens: Interchangeable, Mamiya m645 mount
Year of Manufacture: 1975

CCR Review 78 - Mamiya m645
CCR:FRB - Review 02 - JCH StreetPan 400 - Roll 02 (TMax Developer)

Hasselblad 500c/m – John’s first pick for his winter camera is the reliable Hasselblad 500c/m, even in the winter wearing gloves he doesn’t have an issue with the exposure control on the lens. Although a large focusing lever does help!

Camera Specs
Make: Hasselblad
Model: 500c/m
Type: Single Lens Reflex
Format: Medium Format, 120/220, 6×6
Lens: Interchangeable, Hasselblad V mount
Year of Manufacture: 1975

Fuji GSW690II – When it comes to winter there’s something to be said about capturing the beautiful winter snowscapes especially when it’s on a 6×9 negative. That’s why the GSW690 is James’ pick for a winter camera. Not to mention with a nickname “Texas Leica” it’s big enough to use with those winter gloves.

CCR - Season 4 - Recording Session 1James with his newly aquired GSW690II

Camera Specs
Make: Fuji
Model: GSW690II
Type: Rangefinder
Format: Medium Format, 120/220, 6×9
Lens: Fixed, EBC Fujinon-W f=65mm 1:5.6
Year of Manufacture: 1985

Nikon FM2n – When it comes to winter photography, Bill’s choice is out of both need for something that works in cold weather, and is compact enough to pack when he’s out skiing. And the vertical shutter on the FM2n is his choice as it has yet to fail even deep into the -20s.

CCR - Review 16 - Nikon FM2n

Camera Specs
Make: Nikon
Model: FM2n
Type: Single Lens Reflex
Format: 135 (35mm), 24x36mm
Lens: Interchangeable, Nikon F-Mount
Year of Manufacture: 1983

Abandoned Caledon Farm House TwoReally Cold on Wortley's Wiggle

Canon A-1 – Despite what Bill says, Donna’s main choice of winter cameras is the Canon A-1, it’s compact enough to fit in a pocket and has the needed size to be handled even in gloves.

Fade To Black

Camera Specs
Make: Canon
Model: A-1
Type: Single Lens Reflex
Format: 135 (35mm), 24x36mm
Lens: Interchangeable, Canon FD-Mount
Year of Manufacture: 1978

Canon Elan 7ne – The best way to handle cold weather, easy, get a camera with eye-focusing and a great program mode. For Mike that’s the Elan 7ne, with one of the best eye-control focus, the camera tracks his eye movement across the frame and adjusts, if that’s not good for gloves, then we don’t know what is!

Canon EOS Elan 7NE

Camera Specs
Make: Canon
Model: Elan 7ne
Type: Single Lens Reflex
Format: 135 (35mm), 24x36mm
Lens: Interchangeable, Canon EF-Mount
Year of Manufacture: 2004

Contax N1 – When it comes to cold, there’s no better choice than the biggest, baddest camera you can get your hands on. And for Trevor, that’s the Contax N-1, built by Kyocera and features some amazing Zeiss lenses. But don’t go out looking for one, your wallet will hate you for it.

CCR - Season 4 - Recording Session 1Trevor showing off the Contax N1

Camera Specs
Make: Kyocera
Model: Contax N1
Type: Single Lens Reflex
Format: 135 (35mm), 24x36mm
Lens: Interchangeable, Contax N-Mount
Year of Manufacture: 2001

Film Abuse
We’ve all done some crazy things to make film do what we want. From extreme pushes and pulls, cross-processing, and odd developing methods. But sometimes you just have to do what you need to get the results you want. Or just because you want to see if you can! Not to mention tales from the deep jungle and hockey arenas across the country there are plenty of ways that you can abuse film and make it give you the results you want!

Country CharmAlex’s favourite, the Panatomic-X trick,
take TMax 100, expose at 32 and soup in Rodinal or Xtol


Kodak TMax 400 pushed rather far and souped in Diafine

Polypan @ 1600Who says you can’t take a 50-speed film up to 1600, Mike sure can with Polypan F

Night AlleyAnd you can’t deny that Tri-X you can do pretty much anything you want with it and it’ll spit out great results

Looking for a good spot to get your gear and material fix check out Burlington Camera (Burlington, ON), Downtown Camera (Toronto, ON), Film Plus (Toronto, ON), Belle Arte Camera (Hamilton, ON), Pond’s FotoSource (Guleph, ON), Foto Art Camera (Owen Sound, ON). Out West there’s The Camera Store (Calgary, AB) and Beau Photo Supply (Vancouver, BC). Additionally you can order online at Argentix (Quebec), buyfilm.ca (Ontario), the Film Photography Project or Freestyle Photographic.

Also you can connect with us through email: classiccamerarevivial[at]gmail[dot]com or by Facebook, we’re at Classic Camera Revival or even Twitter @ccamerarevival

Classic Camera Revival – Episode 36 – Last But Not Least

Classic Camera Revival – Episode 36 – Last But Not Least

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We’ve covered a fair amount of ground this season on Classic Camera Revival and lots of cameras have been left in the dust. But we’re here at the end of the year to play a bit of catch-up and discuss those cameras that we didn’t have time to bring up during the year!

Cameras Featured on this show
Pentax K1000 – A student classic, while the favoured son of the K-Mount cameras it wasn’t the original. This is one of many cameras that is perfect for learning the photographic craft on! Simple, no-nonsense and can operate with or without the battery. Plus you have access to an amazing lineup of lenses that can still be had at an inexpensive cost. Alex received this camera from his Grandfather and isn’t getting rid of it this time around, unlike past K1000s that have passed through his toolkit.

CCR - Review 2 - Pentax K1000

Technical Details
Make: Pentax
Model: K1000
Type: Single Lens Reflex
Format: Minature, 135 (35mm), 36x24mm
Lens: Interchangeable, Pentax K-Mount
Year of Manufacture: 1979-1997

TFSM - Spring '15 - Queen StreetTFSM - Spring '15 - Queen StreetTFSM - Spring '15 - Queen Street

Pentax MX – The mechanical cousin of the Pentax ME, released in the wake of the Olympus OM-1 and the trend of making smaller SLRs. This is an all mechanical camera, that produces wonderful images!

Classic Camera Revival - Episode 36 - Last But Not Least

Technical Details
Make: Pentax
Model: MX
Type: Single Lens Reflex
Format: Minature, 135 (35mm), 36x24mm
Lens: Interchangeable, Pentax K-Mount
Year of Manufacture: 1976-1985

The DVP Looking NorthLower BayviewBroadview Station Bound Car

Mamiya 645AFD – Probably the newest camera we’ve ever featured on our show. The 645AFD is the second auto-focus model of the classic wedding photographer’s camera the Mamiya m645. The camera features full autofocus, magazine loading, and full auto-exposure. And certain newer versions of this camera can accept a digital back, but we don’t hold that against the camera.

Technical Details
Make: Mamiya
Model: 645AFD
Type: Single Lens Reflex
Format: Medium (120/220), 6×4.5
Lens: Interchangeable, Mamiya AF Mount
Year of Manufacture: 2001

TFS-02_28_16-03P400-001TFS-02_28_16-11

Voigtländer Bessa – When it comes to folders there are lots of good and bad cameras out there. This recent addition to Alex’s collection comes from his Uncle Harvey. And while the lack of a rangefinder for focus can see some issues, an external rangefinder helps out. Of course, the one issue he found is that the film winder shreds the plastic take-up reels. At least he has a collection of old metal ones.

CCR Review 70 - Voigtlander Bessa

Technical Details
Make: Voigtländer
Model: Bessa
Type: Point-And-Shoot
Format: Medium, 120/620, 6×4.5/6×9
Lens: Fixed, Voigtländer Anastigmat Voigtar 1:4,5 F=11cm
Year of Manufacture: 1935-1937

St. JamesRise of the CondosFlatiron No. 1

Minolta Minoltina P – This beautiful little compact camera is Minolta’s response to the Olympus Trip 35. Compact, semi-automatic with zone focusing. Plus add a Rokkor lens and you have a winning camera.

CCR Review 45 - Minolta Minoltina-P

Technical Details
Make: Minolta
Model: Minoltina P
Type: Point-And-Shoot
Format: Minature, 135 (35mm), 36x24mm
Lens: Fixed, Minolta Rokkor 1:2.8 f=38mm
Year of Manufacture: 1963

CCR Review 45 - Minolta Minoltina-PSolitaireSolitude

Kiev 3a – John opted to stick with this Russian copy of the Contax III rangefinder and selling off his Contax IIIa to co-host Alex, who loves it! The reason? Lenses! Most Jupiter lenses that are based on the Contax RF mount won’t actually mount on post-war Contax rangefinders. Something Alex found out the hard way.

Classic Camera Revival - Episode 36 - Last But Not Least

Technical Details
Make: Arsenal
Model: Kiev 3a
Type: Rangefinder
Format: Minature, 135 (35mm), 36x24mm
Lens: Interchangeable, Contax RF Mount (Pre-War)
Year of Manufacture: 1954-1959

Kiev plus Jupiter 12Kiev plus Jupiter 12Kiev plus Jupiter 12

Minolta Autocord – Minolta’s answer to the Yashica. This lovely metered TLR is a great camera and one of Bill’s favourites when he doesn’t want to lug along the fridge of his Mamyia C-Series. Of course given the age, the camera does need to go into service soon.

Classic Camera Revival - Episode 36 - Last But Not Least

Technical Details
Make: Minolta
Model: Autocord CdS III
Type: Twin Lens Reflex
Format: Medium, 120/220, 6×6
Lens: Fixed, Minolta Rokkor 1:3.5 f=75mm
Year of Manufacture: 1966

Lakeshore Rd. Monday MorningDon Jail_Front St. on Saturday Morning_

Ricoh Diacord L – While this camera has been on our show before and lovingly called the DOAcord. But with a little love, and a stern talking to this camera is a strong performer!

CCR Review 75 - Ricoh Diacord L

Technical Details
Make: Ricoh
Model: Diacord L
Type: Twin Lens Reflex
Format: Medium (120), 6×6
Lens: Fixed, Rikenon 1:3.5 f=8cm
Year of Manufacture: 1957

CCR Review 75 - Ricoh Diacord LMill Pond - Diacord LMill Pond - Diacord L

Yashica 124G – A recent acquisition for Donna, sadly she hasn’t had the chance to take it out to shoot yet!

Technical Details
Make: Yashica
Model: Yashicamat 124G
Type: Twin Lens Reflex
Format: Medium (120/220), 6×6
Lens: Fixed, Yashinon f=8cm 1:3.5
Year of Manufacture: 1970-1986

Fomapan – An Inexpensive Classic
Foma is a polarizing film, either you like it or you don’t. While the whole gang enjoys Foma 100, they’re not too pleased with 200 or 400.

Fomapan 100 – Some examples of Fomapan 100
TFSM - Spring '17Old Rusted ChainguardAfter the Storm

Fomapan 200 – Some examples of Fomapan 200
The Sailor (Again)Barn

Fomapan 400 – Some examples of Fomapan 400
Still Bananas

Looking for a good spot to get your gear and material fix check out Burlington Camera (Burlington, ON), Downtown Camera (Toronto, ON), Film Plus (Toronto, ON), Belle Arte Camera (Hamilton, ON), Pond’s FotoSource (Guleph, ON), Foto Art Camera (Owen Sound, ON). Out West there’s The Camera Store (Calgary, AB) and Beau Photo Supply (Vancouver, BC). Additionally you can order online at Argentix (Quebec), buyfilm.ca (Ontario), the Film Photography Project or Freestyle Photographic.

Also you can connect with us through email: classiccamerarevivial[at]gmail[dot]com or by Facebook, we’re at Classic Camera Revival or even Twitter @ccamerarevival

Classic Camera Revival – Episode 35 – Seeing Red

Classic Camera Revival – Episode 35 – Seeing Red

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While we mostly focus on cameras on our podcast, with the weather reports speaking to a classic Canadian winter it might be time for the whole gang to settle into some solid printing time in the darkroom. So to get us and you ready the gang speaks on everything darkroom that’ll have you seeing red (under your safelight). Enlargers, chemicals, papers and more. Sorry, no detailed episode notes for this show. But here are some of the items discussed.

Durst M601 – A solid enlarger that has a built-in film carrier with adjustable masks that work great for 35mm up to 6×6.

Leitz V35AF – One of the hardest things with making prints is focusing! Well, you don’t have to worry about it with this enlarger, but you’ll be stuck with 35mm only.

For paper and chemistry, the gang has printed on almost everything out there. For the most part, we do stick to the most common and readily available from Ilford, their Multigrade papers are a great place to start. But other papers we’ve used include Adox, Kentmere, Kodak, and even Foma with beautiful results. As for chemistry, most of us stick to Kodak Dektol and usual tone with Selenium.

Griffin's Battery - Print Griffen Battery at Ghettysburg – Printed on Ilford MGIV RC Satin – Kodak Dektol (1+2) 1:00, Toned with Selenium (1+4) 2:30

Looking for a good spot to get your gear and material fix check out Burlington Camera (Burlington, ON), Downtown Camera (Toronto, ON), Film Plus (Toronto, ON), Belle Arte Camera (Hamilton, ON), Pond’s FotoSource (Guleph, ON), Foto Art Camera (Owen Sound, ON). Out West there’s The Camera Store (Calgary, AB) and Beau Photo Supply (Vancouver, BC). Additionally you can order online at Argentix (Quebec), buyfilm.ca (Ontario), the Film Photography Project or Freestyle Photographic.

Also you can connect with us through email: classiccamerarevivial[at]gmail[dot]com or by Facebook, we’re at Classic Camera Revival or even Twitter @ccamerarevival

Classic Camera Revival – Episode 34 – Authorised for Field Use

Classic Camera Revival – Episode 34 – Authorised for Field Use

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Some cameras are best left in the studio, yet we still give ourselves back problems by carrying them out into the field with us! The gang takes on the entire chiropractic industry by flaunting our massive cameras that are best left inside, yet we’ve authorised these beasts for field use.

Cameras Featured on this Show

Mamyia RZ67 -Have you ever wondered what sort of quality photos a cinderblock with a lens would take? Well, that is pretty much what the RZ67 is, a cinderblock that takes stunning images! Surprisingly there’s even strap mounting lugs on this beast! The electronic version of the all mechanical RB67 and just as big. The best part is that if you have a selection of RB67 lenses you can easily use them on an RZ as well.

Classic Camera Revival - Episode 34 - Authorised for Field Use

Camera Specs

  • Make: Mamyia
  • Model: RZ67
  • Type: Single Lens Reflex
  • Format: Medium Format (120/220), 6×7
  • Lens: Interchangeable,
  • Year of Manufacture: 1982

Red filter plus Polarizer

Fence Detail

CCR Review 40 - Mamyia RB67

Fuji GX680iii – When you put the RZ67 next to the Fuji GX680iii, you can see that the 680 is certainly the heavyweight champ. Shooting the slightly larger 6×8 negative, this beast is basically a large format camera, bellows focus, twin rails (that can be extended), beautiful Fujinon glass that can stop down to f/45, some movements and interchangeable bellows. James warns however that while you can get a kit cheap, just make sure to get the GX680iii, easier to find batteries.

Classic Camera Revival - Episode 34 - Authorised for Field Use

Camera Specs

  • Make: Fujifilm
  • Model: GX680iii
  • Type: Single Lens Reflex
  • Format: Medium Format (120/220), 6×8
  • Lens: Interchangeable
  • Year of Manufacture: 1997-2010

CCR - Review 7 - Fuji GX680iii

Halton Region Museum

Halton Region Museum

Monorail LF in the Field
When it comes to Large Format shooting in the field there are some cameras that are designed to do this, 4×5 Field Cameras or Press Cameras can be easily folded up and transported around without too much effort. That being said, once you get into 8×10 unless you drop the cash on an 8×10 field camera you’re stuck with a monorail. Now, there’s nothing wrong with a monorail camera it’s just they’re more aimed at studio shooting. However, Mike & Donna have gone just that little bit extra to ensure that the Cambo Legend is easier taken out than most, by using a little red collapsible wagon.

Another Big One

SPUR of the Moment
For those who have never heard of SPUR HRX, don’t worry too much, it wasn’t until Mike let us in on this great developer out of Germany that the gang took to try it out. According to the information on the SPUR website, the developer is primarily optimized in view of achieving the highest possible fineness of grain. SPUR HRX delivers high sharpness and outstanding detail contrast. Another advantage of HRX is its superbly sophisticated tonality due to the ideal, linear gradation curve gradient preventing dull or flat results.

Classic Camera Revival - Episode 34 - Authorised for Field Use

Some examples that the crew has shot and developed with SPUR HRX!
CCR Review 68 - Bronica GS-1

TFSM - Winter '17

Solitaire

Embrace The Imperfections

Looking for a good spot to get your gear and material fix check out Burlington Camera (Burlington, ON), Downtown Camera (Toronto, ON), Film Plus (Toronto, ON), Belle Arte Camera (Hamilton, ON), Pond’s FotoSource (Guleph, ON), Foto Art Camera (Owen Sound, ON). Out West there’s The Camera Store (Calgary, AB) and Beau Photo Supply (Vancouver, BC). Additionally you can order online at Argentix (Quebec), buyfilm.ca (Ontario), the Film Photography Project or Freestyle Photographic.

Also you can connect with us through email: classiccamerarevivial[at]gmail[dot]com or by Facebook, we’re at Classic Camera Revival or even Twitter @ccamerarevival

Classic Camera Revival – Episode 33 – That Awkward Moment

Classic Camera Revival – Episode 33 – That Awkward Moment

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We are not fanboys of any camera system and half the fun of running a podcast about classic cameras is being able to both praise the cameras we like and point out the more difficult aspects of others. Now don’t get us wrong, all these cameras are actually decent machines on their image quality but sometimes you just have to ask, what were the designers thinking when they started to make these cameras.

Cameras Featured on Today’s Show
Olympus XA – The smallest ‘full frame’ rangefinder out there, with solid optics, and a cult following. But you have to contend with a hair trigger, that would just as soon shoot every other frame without you wanting it to do so.

CCR Review 26 - Olympus XA

  • Make: Olympus
  • Model: XA
  • Type: Rangefinder
  • Format: 135 (35mm), 36x24mm
  • Lens: Fixed, Olympus F.Zuiko 1:2.8 f=35mm
  • Year of Manufacture: 1979

Sarah Silver
Olympus XA – Olympus F.Zuiko 1:2.8 f=35mm – Ilford Delta 400

Fire Station #17
Olympus XA – Olympus F.Zuiko 1:2.8 f=35mm – Kodak Plus-X – Kodak Xtol (1+1) 7:15 @ 20C

CCR Review 26 - Olympus XA
Olympus XA – Olympus F.Zuiko 1:2.8 f=35mm – Ultrafine Extreme 400 – Kodak Xtol (1+1) 9:30 @ 20C

Mamiya Universal – An attempt to draw away press photographers from their large format rigs. This highly customizable roll film rangefinder takes all the humbling parts of a large format camera and slaps it onto a medium format camera without taking advantage of most things that would make a medium format rangefinder great.

CCR Review 47 - Mamyia Universal

  • Make: Mamiya
  • Model: Universal
  • Type: Rangefinder
  • Format: Medium (120/220), 6×7, 6×9 or Polaroid (Type 100)
  • Lens: Interchangeable, Mamiya Press Mount
  • Year of Manufacture: 1969

Mill Pond - Mamiya Universal Press
Mamyia Universal – Mamyia-Sekor 90mm 1:3.5 – Rollei RPX 100 @ ASA-100 – Kodak Xtol (Stock) 8:00 @ 20C

Justine In Colour 2
Mamiya Universal – Mamiya-Sekor 1:4.5 f=127mm – Fuji FP-100c

CCR Review 47 - Mamyia Universal
Mamiya Universal – Mamiya-Sekor 1:4.5 f=127mm – Fuji Acros 100 @ ASA-100 – FA-1027 (1+14) 9:30 @ 20C

Barnack Leicas – An iconic camera in any circle, the Leica III has remained true to the early design of Oskar Barnack as a compact camera designed at the time to accept motion picture film (35mm). While of high optical quality, these things can be a bit of pain, especially when it comes to loading your film.

CCR - Review 36 - Leica IIIc
An example of a Leica IIIc with a mounted Leitz Summitar f=5cm 1:2 lens

  • Make: Ernst Leitz GmbH
  • Model: Leica I through the Leica IIIg
  • Type: Rangefinder
  • Format: 135, 36x24mm
  • Lens: Interchangable, Leica Thread Mount/M39
  • Year of Manufacture: 1930-1960

Ghost House
Leica IIIf – Leitz Elmar f=5cm 1:3.5 – Kodak Tri-X 400 – Kodak Xtol (1+1) 9:00 @ 20C

Old Train Station
Leica IIIa – Voigtlander Helios 15mm/4.5 lens – Kodak Tri-X 400 – Pyrocat-HD 1+1+100 16:00 @ 20C

Project:1812 - Fort Erie
Leica IIIc – Leitz Summitar f=5cm 1:2 (Yellow Filter) – Fuji Neopan SS – HC-110 Dil. B 5:30 @ 20C

Exakta VX1000 – The camera made famous by Alfred Hitchcock’s film, Rear Window, is designed to throw any photographer into fits because it’s designed to be used left handed. Yes, everything is switched around with this camera from how you would normally operate an SLR. But don’t look past it yet, those lenses are Carl Zeiss.

CCR Review 61 - Exakta VX IIa

  • Make: Ihagee Dresden
  • Model: Exakta VX1000
  • Type: Single Lens Reflex
  • Format: 135, 36x24mm
  • Lens: Interchangeable, Exakta Bayonet
  • Year of Manufacture: 1967-1970

Scritching - B/W
Ihagee Dresden Exakta VXIIa – Steinheil Munchen Culminar 135mm ƒ/4.5 – Kodak Gold 200 – Jobo C-41 Press Kit

Bridge Home
Ihagee Dresden Exakta VXIIa – Carl Zeiss Jena Tessar 50mm ƒ/2.8 – Kodak Portra 160NC

CCR Review 61 - Exakta VX IIa
Exakta VX IIA – Carl Zeiss Jena Biotar 2/58 – Kodak TMax 100 @ ASA-100 – Kodak D-23 (Stock) 9:30 @ 20C

Cambo Legend 8×10 – Well it goes without saying that anything with 8×10 in the camera model is going to be awkward because when it comes to using a monorail camera in the field, you need a mule, or in Donna’s case a husband. But still, there’s nothing better in the standard camera sized better than an 8×10 negative.

Cambo SC 8x10

  • Make: Cambo
  • Model: Legend 8×10
  • Type: View Camera, Monorail
  • Format: Large Format, 8×10
  • Lens: Interchangeable, Cambo Lens Board
  • Year of Manufacture:

Black & White Slides
While the summer has gone, we still have the memory through beautiful slides. But wait, black & white? Yes, it is a thing! In the past there’s the legendary Agfa Scala 200x, today there are still two black & white reversal stocks on the market with Fomapan 100R and Adox Scala 160. However, there is a small lab that specializes in turning your black & white negative films into reversal slides, and that’s Dr5. Throughout the spring and summer the gang has been shooting, sending, and waiting. And Dr5 delivered some beautiful results!

For Alex, he selected to shoot Ilford HP5+ because it was a rainy dull sort of day. The Results speak for themselves in his view.
Dr5 Test Roll - Ilford HP5+

Dr5 Test Roll - Ilford HP5+

Dr5 Test Roll - Ilford HP5+

Bill decided to shoot some of the new dedicated black & white slide film from Adox, Adox Scala 160x. This film stock is based on the legendary Agfa Scala 200x.
The Grainery in March

Oakville Harbour March 2017

Downtown Oakville in March

John, like Alex, took a normally B&W Negative film, Ilford FP4+ and had it turned into a Positive. FP4+ is already a beautiful film but this made it all the better.

Of course, Dr5 is the only commercial lab out there doing B&W Slides, but that doesn’t mean you can’t-do them yourself at home as Mike has done.
Soft Bokeh

Looking for a good spot to get your gear and material fix check out Burlington Camera (Burlington, ON), Downtown Camera (Toronto, ON), Film Plus (Toronto, ON), Belle Arte Camera (Hamilton, ON), Pond’s FotoSource (Guleph, ON), Foto Art Camera (Owen Sound, ON). Out West there’s The Camera Store (Calgary, AB) and Beau Photo Supply (Vancouver, BC). Additionally you can order online at Argentix (Quebec), buyfilm.ca (Ontario), the Film Photography Project or Freestyle Photographic.

Also you can connect with us through email: classiccamerarevivial[at]gmail[dot]com or by Facebook, we’re at Classic Camera Revival or even Twitter @ccamerarevival

Classic Camera Revival – Episode 32 – Sloppy Seconds

Classic Camera Revival – Episode 32 – Sloppy Seconds

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One thing is for sure when it comes to film photography unless you have the big bucks, you’re buying used gear. But there’s so much out there, what is a good way to buy this gear, maintain it, or even sell it! The gang jumps into a lively discussion on what to and not to do when buying used gear. Including on how to spot a fake Leica. You can also find additional information at Johan Niel’s site. Talking about optics including the dreaded fungus. Also, we decode Ebay for purchasing your used gear, and how to spot a bad deal!

Looking for a good spot to get your gear and material fix check out Burlington Camera (Burlington, ON), Downtown Camera (Toronto, ON), Film Plus (Toronto, ON), Belle Arte Camera (Hamilton, ON), Pond’s FotoSource (Guleph, ON), Foto Art Camera (Owen Sound, ON). Out West there’s The Camera Store (Calgary, AB) and Beau Photo Supply (Vancouver, BC). Additionally you can order online at Argentix (Quebec), buyfilm.ca (Ontario), the Film Photography Project or Freestyle Photographic.

Also you can connect with us through email: classiccamerarevivial[at]gmail[dot]com or by Facebook, we’re at Classic Camera Revival or even Twitter @ccamerarevival

Classic Camera Revival – Episode 31 – Mystery Camera Challenge II

Classic Camera Revival – Episode 31 – Mystery Camera Challenge II

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The Mystery Camera Challenge, a fun little game we played in Season 2 where we all bring a single camera to the table, then draw names and take a stab at using the camera that the person’s who’s name we drew. Unlike last seasons, this time around we are rocking 35mm film.

Cameras Featured on Today’s Episode

Zeiss Ikon Contaflex Super BC – Zeiss Ikon seemed to have a good thing going with their Contaflex line, but the Super BC is a decent addition with a shutter priority meter that is battery powered. The camera also is unique in that it takes interchangeable optics with the aperture and shutter (leaf) remaining on the camera body itself. The Super BC belongs to Mike and was shot by Bill.

Classic Camera Revival - Episode 31

  • Make: Zeiss Ikon
  • Model: Contaflex Super BC
  • Type: Single Lens Reflex
  • Format: 135 (35mm), 36x24mm
  • Lens: Interchangeable Front Element Cluster, Breach lock
  • Year of Manufacture: 1965-1968

Corner House II

Old Acton House

What the Dickens

Kyocera Contax G2 – One of the world’s two auto-focus rangefinders, the other being the Contax G1. A solid performer, but not a true rangefinder as if you turn off the AF function it becomes little better than a zone-focus or guesstimates focus camera with little feedback in the viewfinder. But don’t let that stop you, quality Zeiss Licenced optics on the front. But even used these cameras carry a bit of a price tag. The G2 belongs to Alex and was shot by Mike.

Classic Camera Revival - Episode 31

  • Make: Kyocera
  • Model: Contax G2
  • Type: AF Rangefinder
  • Format: 135 (35mm), 36x24mm
  • Lens: Interchangeable, Contax G-Mount
  • Year of Manufacture: 1996

Classic Camera Revival - Trio

No Smoking

Classic Camera Revival Mystery Camera

Cosina Voigtländer Bessa R2M – The R2M gives the user a quality rangefinder experience that is pretty accessible to any photographer that knows their way around a camera. Combine that with the versatile Leica M-Mount, a solid meter with good exposure feedback. A bright viewfinder with solid parallax correction guides and easy film loading. Just watch out if you wear glasses, no built-in diopter can make it a slight pain to operate. The R2M belongs to John and was shot by Donna.

Classic Camera Revival - Episode 31

  • Make: Cosina
  • Model: Voigtländer Bessa R2M
  • Type: Rangefinder
  • Format: 135 (35mm), 36x24mm
  • Lens: Interchangeable, Leica M-Mount
  • Year of Manufacture: 2006

Voigtlander Bessa R2M Heliar 50mm ƒ/2 Fomapan 200

Voigtlander Bessa R2M Heliar 50mm ƒ/2 Fomapan 200

Voigtlander Bessa R2M Heliar 50mm ƒ/2 Fomapan 200

Asahi Pentax H3 – Ashai had a long line of SLRs before the Spotmatic came on the scene and the H3 is one of them. But if you’ve shot a Spotmatic, you can shoot the H3, familiar handling, solid Takumar optics, and all manual functionality makes the camera a good performer and great handling. Just watch out, age may not has been kind to these cameras. The Pentax H3 belongs to Bill and was shot by Alex.

Classic Camera Revival - Episode 31

  • Make: Ashai
  • Model: Pentax H3
  • Type: Single Lens Reflex
  • Format: 135 (35mm) 36x24mm
  • Lens: Interchangeable, M42 Mount
  • Year of Manufacture: 1960

Classic Camera Revival - Mystery Camera Challenge II

Classic Camera Revival - Mystery Camera Challenge II

Classic Camera Revival - Mystery Camera Challenge II

Ricoh XR-P – When it came to Pentax clones Ricoh seemed to have it made. Which is funny, because they currently own Pentax. But the XR-P is your typical plastic camera but is solid to use, has a great meter, and has a K-Mount which opens up so many lens options, but even their own line of glass is solid performers. Combine that with an inexpensive price tag, and a slim motor drive and you got a throw-around camera. Just watch out, we are talking 1980s electronics when they go, they go. The XR-P belongs to Donna and was shot by John.

Classic Camera Revival - Episode 31

  • Make: Ricoh
  • Model: XR-P
  • Type: Single Lens Reflex
  • Format: 135 (35mm), 24x36mm
  • Lens: Interchangeable, Pentax K-Mount
  • Year of Manufacture: 1984

Ricoh and FPP 200

Ricoh and FPP 200

Ricoh and FPP 200

One Last Chance – Efke Films
While we all mourn the loss of Efke film, recently a gentleman has been selling new-old-stock out of Croatia on Ebay for actually decent prices. For those who don’t know, Efke films were produced by Fotokemika, the company founded in 1947 produced several black & white films and papers. While they produced their own films for several decades, they would begin to produce Adox films in the 1970s. Of course, we’ve all shot their usually panchromatic films ranging from ASA-25 to ASA-100, but they also produced two different Infrared films, IR820 and IR820 Aura. Even as film technology advanced, they continued to produce classic, silver rich films into the 2000s. But age would begin to take its toll and malfunctions and inability to repair their machines would force the company to shut its doors in 2012. Thankfully the timely Ebay seller gave everyone a chance for a victory lap. But this isn’t the film of today you need to be careful, the film responds well to most developers, but you’ll want to stick to a water only stop bath and a fixer with a hardener in it.

101st Airborne
Pacemaker Crown Graphic – Fuji Fujinon W 1:5.6/125 – Efke PL25 @ ASA-25
PMK Pyro (1+2+100) 7:30 @ 21C

Oh that Swirl
Nikon F5 – Lomography Daguerreotype Achromat 2.9/64 (Orange-22) – Efke KB100
Kodak D-23 (Stock) 7:45 @ 20C

EFKE 820 Aura036
Rolleiflex E3 – Schneider-Kruzenak Xenotar 75mm 1:3.5 (R72) – Efke IR820 Aura
Rodinal (1+25) 9:00 @ 20C

EFKE 820 Aura at the Beaches
Pentax Spotmatic SP1000 – Makinon Auto 1:2.8 f=28mm (R72) – Efke IR820 Aura
Rodinal (1+25) 9:00 @ 20C

IR Humber Glow
Calumet CC400 – Carl Zeiss Tessar 105mm ƒ/4.7 (R72) – Efke IR820
Kodak HC-110 Dil. B 7:00 @ 20C

Rundown
Calumet CC400 – Kodak Ektar 127mm ƒ/4.7 (Red-25a) – Efke IR820
Rodinal (1+25) 9:00 @ 20C

Lakeshore Road Looking East
Nikon F2 – Auto Nikkor-S 50mm 1:1.4 – Efke KB100
Kodak HC-110 Dil. B 5:30 @ 20C

Oakville Harbour
Nikon F2 – Auto Nikkor-Q 135mm 1:2.8 – Efke KB100
Kodak HC-110 Dil. B 5:30 @ 20C

Of course, while we won’t see Efke again, Adox has returned to film production and currently is producing Adox CHS 100 II similar to Adox CHS 100/Efke KB100 in 35mm, 120, and large format up to 20×24.

The Capitol
Graflex Pacemaker Crown Graphic – Fuji Fujinon-W 1:5.6/125 (Orange-22) – Adox CHS100II @ ASA-100 – Blazinal (1+25) 5:00 @ 20C

Looking for a good spot to get your gear and material fix check out Burlington Camera (Burlington, ON), Downtown Camera (Toronto, ON), Film Plus (Toronto, ON), Belle Arte Camera (Hamilton, ON), Pond’s FotoSource (Guleph, ON), Foto Art Camera (Owen Sound, ON). Out West there’s The Camera Store (Calgary, AB) and Beau Photo Supply (Vancouver, BC). Additionally you can order online at Argentix (Quebec), buyfilm.ca (Ontario), the Film Photography Project or Freestyle Photographic.

Also you can connect with us through email: classiccamerarevivial[at]gmail[dot]com or by Facebook, we’re at Classic Camera Revival or even Twitter @ccamerarevival