This is what it’s all been leading up to. A print, there’s something unique about holding a print in your hand, looking down at the patterns of light and shadow being brought out in blacks, whites, and grays, it’s magic. Well actually its science, the perfect blend of art and science. Creating the print is a rather neat process from start to end and when you sit down and think about the sheer amount of control you have over the whole process is fantastic. You get to pick the camera (and in some cases the lens), film stock. Then you can meter it the wayRead More →

Week Three is dedicated to my Dad and to Mary-Irene. Mary Irene I first met on twitter as one of the social media gals from the Eastman Kodak company, we met for lunch back in August when I was in Rochester and she was the first person outside of my circle of photography friends to hear about this project, she has since moved on to work for Toys R Us, so this is the perfect blend, her past job at Kodak (Tri-X), and her new job (Toys). The weather report was saying that the weekend was going to be dull and rainy, so I reallyRead More →

Back in October when I visited New York City in addition to a plethora of still photography cameras I also took along a super 8 camera, and while in NYC picked up two cartridges of Super8 film, Kodak E100D, and shot them around the city. Once again the footage was out of focus, which I soon found out was due to the camera not my operation of it. Which is a good thing over all. Again I’m rather pleased with how it all turned out. Now the camera, it sadly lost it’s life after getting hit by a subway (after I had pulled the secondRead More →

When it rains, the last place you’ll want to be is Fort Meigs, trust me on this one. The fort isn’t the nicest fort that got involved in the war, there is not a long drawn out or particularly memorable history about the depot fortification. It really is more of an afterthought, a post designed to be a stopping point for troops and supplies, and while it saw only two sieges over the course of the war it did stand out in one way. It was the largest wooden palisade wall fort in all of North America, at least when it was first built. UnlikeRead More →

The Siege of Fort Meigs was a mess, a minor action at a depot fort that did little but injury the personal morale of a British officer and drive a wedge in the strained alliance between Tecumseh and the British. It was the opening move in the long game of William Henry Harrison and his designs for the invasion of Upper Canada. A muddy mess that did little to further the British plans but was exactly what Harrison had hoped in the end. A small, tactical victory. One of seven blockhouses that served as defensive strong points and secure artillery batteries for the palasade wallRead More →

Located in the shadows of condo towers, the gentle rumble of traffic along the Gardiner Expressway lays Fort York, one of the few reminders to Toronto’s colonial past as muddy York, the seat of government for Upper Canada. For those who have been following my other photography project related to the War of 1812 have already seen this particular location so I took a different spin, rather than capturing wider angle shots I focused more on the fort’s details. Fort York was established in 1793 under the orders of John Graves Simcoe, and built by the Queen’s York Rangers. In April of 1813 American shipsRead More →

Ah Belfountain, after finding out about this place through fellow photographer Bill Smith, it soon became a favourite spot of mine to take a nice winter’s walk. Thinking I’d have a nice sunny afternoon I heading out for the hour drive north. Sadly it was all cloudy by the time I got there, so rather than blow a roll of slide film in such dull light, I only took my trusty Nikon FM2 and one of my last rolls of Agfa APX100. This time I also took a walk up into the village of Belfountain as well to grab some shot there before retiring toRead More →

While many forts from the Anglo-American War of 1812 survive today in either original form or having been rebuilt in the 20th-Century, there are just as many that have not survived or have survived in a limited fashion. One such location and the center of the early days of the conflict is Fort Amherstburg or better known as its second name, Fort Malden. Located along the Detroit River in the town of Amherstburg, Ontario was the seat of British power on the western frontier of Upper Canada. There are few remains of the American built Fort Malden, but today the former site is operated byRead More →

At the foot of Trafalgar Road is one of my two favourite locations in the town of Oakville, the downtown. Located along the old Highway 2, now Lakeshore Road is dotted with boutique stores, coffee shops and high-end restaurants. The snow and bright sun only made the place that much better in my view as I took a cold walk through not only the main street but the side streets that run down to the lake, taking in again the century homes, the small frame ones to grand brick manor homes, reminders of Oakville’s past, and current wealth in the area. Nikon F3 – AI-SRead More →

The American plan for the invasion of Upper Canada would be a simple one. A coordinated three-pronged attack that would strike at Fort Amherstburg in the West, Montreal in the East, and the Niagara Penisula in the center. But in the 19th-Century coordinating three attacks with such vast distances between them was impossible. The Americans also believed that the local population would welcome them as liberators, not invaders. The quick turnabout at Detroit proved this second part wrong. And while General Isaac Brock proved himself the Saviour of Upper Canada at Detroit he would soon face both his next challenge and his mortality. A PlaqueRead More →