If you can recall, when I reviewed the Leica R3, I mentioned that it would be better to get a Minolta XE. Well here we are right near the end and sure enough, I picked a Minolta XE-7 to review as a contrast to the R3. And honestly, if you take a look at the two cameras side by each, you know they both come from the same foundations, at least at the forty yard test. Thankfully there are plenty of differences beyond just the prism shape. The XE-7 is thankfully a Minolta camera, not a Leica camera with a Minolta brand slapped on it.Read More →

As someone who learned photography on a rangefinder, I have a soft spot for the style of camera. And as a student of history, being able to shoot on a camera made by the oldest photography companies in the world (sort of) is even better. Taking both these facts, the Bessa R2M is a joy of a camera. Joy in the sense that it is a very accessible camera, pretty much if you can shoot any film camera you can use this one, and without the gnashing of teeth that might come with a German rangefinder camera. Now as you may (or may not) knowRead More →

While I have shot only a handful of Canon products during my reviews, they’ve all given positive results in my books. The Canon FTb is not bucking this trend as a solid match needle, mechanical SLR it is certainly a top pick for me as a student camera. Simple in its operation, and yet provides a good solid introduction to 35mm film photography. Special thanks to Bill Smith for loaning out this black beauty! The Dirt Make: Canon Model: FTb Type: Single Lens Reflex Format: 135 (35mm), 36×24 Len: Interchangeable, Canon FD Mount Year of Manufacture: 1971 The Good The number one thing I loveRead More →

Back in December I was approached by Michael Raso of the Film Photography Project if I wanted to help test a new (to the FPP) film stock. Just before Christmas the film arrived with a little note saying “ASA-6, we think” there was no real indication online how to develop this film in traditional B&W chemistry or it’s exact sensitivity. Google yielded a document by Eastman Kodak on this film stock, Eastman 5363 Positive Film II was a high contrast motion picture film designed for the creation of both positive and negative titles for films. And to develop using Kodak’s D-97 chemistry. Last time IRead More →