Kodak Tri-X, the mention of the film stock is usually met with awe or aversion. But for me, Tri-X is my film of choice no matter what situation I’m going into. I know that with the film I can get consistent results no matter what situation I throw myself into from abandoned buildings to a wedding, and will get amazing results no matter what chemical I toss the film into. With a classic look and feel, you can torture this film to your heart’s content and will always get the results you need. Film Specs Type: Panchromatic B&W Film Base: Acetate Film Speed: ASA-400, Latitude:Read More →

I’ve always found the TLR to be an enjoyable camera to operate. From my very first Lubitel 2, the Yashica-12, and my current Rolleiflex 2.8F. The waist level finder, the dedicated finder lens and near silent operation. Of course, for the average photographer, the two brands that come to mind when it comes to TLRs is Rollei (both flex and cord) along with Yashica. But if you just stuck with these two brands you just might miss out on several other options, one being the Ricoh Diacord. The model under review today is the Diacord L, L standing for lightmeter. While the Diacord could neverRead More →

The penultimate battle of the War of 1812, at least in the eyes of the Americans, and the final big battle in the entire war. By the middle of November 1814 the war in Upper Canada had all but finished for the campaign season, in Ghent the negotiations for peace continued, and if they went well, war would not return. But for the United States the war was far from over and far closer to home. Everything that the government feared would happen with Napoleon’s abdication happened. In June of 1814 a force under General John Sherbroke captured 100 miles of coastline in what wouldRead More →

Here’s the deal, the battle of Tippecanoe wasn’t actually a part of the Anglo-American War of 1812. But I have decided to include it because it was really a prelude to the conflict. Think of it like a prequel setting the stage for William Henry Harrison’s campaign of 1813 and the key to Brock’s capture of Fort Detroit with the required assistance of Tecumseh in 1812. Tippecanoe, like the war of 1812 was a culmination of violence between the Native population and the American government, and the idea of American Manifest Destiny. The Tippecanoe Battlefield monument stands on the battle ground still today. Engraved areRead More →

The outlook for General Henry Procter in the west was grim at best, hopeless at the worst. On September 10th, 1813 Commodore Oliver Hazard Perry had managed to take on the British Royal Navy Squadron on Lake Erie and capture all the ships intact, finally wresting control of Lake Erie from the mighty Royal Navy, this left the door wide open for a full out invasion of Upper Canada in the West. We have met the enemy and they are ours, Hazard penned in a dispatch to General William Henry Harrison who was waiting in the south. Harrison took this as an open invitation. ProcterRead More →

As the project comes to a close, and the new one is just starting to roll out, I figured I should review the Tri-X project. It has been an interesting time for sure, and yes, rules were broken well mostly, switching over to the FM2 then back to the F3. But overall I learned several things over the course of the project. 1. The FM2 likes a 1/3 stop over exposure in dark situation, and a 1/3 under for bright situations. 2. The F3 is a solid camera, but even it needs to be sent in for service (thank you Nikon!) 3. Tri-X looks fantasticRead More →

Okay so these weren’t actually taken on Christmas Day, but rather on Boxing Day. For those in the green part of not the British Commonwealth (Watch Crash Course: US History on YouTube to get that (adjusted) reference) Boxing Day is the day after Christmas Day which is a holiday for us in Canada (and much of the Commonwealth), traditionally it was the day when gifts sent by the post would arrive. I decided to attempt a hike up at my favourite winter hiking spot, the Belfountain Conservation Area. However the ice storm earlier in the week thwarted my efforts felling trees across the paths, andRead More →

From 1999 all the way to 2008 an organization called the Presbyterian Young People’s Society (PYPS) was a big part of my life. PYPS helped me with social skills, leadership, faith, and photography. From 2002 onwards I always had a camera with me at events, all film at first, then mostly digital, and film starting to creep in again at the end. From 2003 onwards I was heavily involved in the leadership of the group as well, and every year we would attend a leadership retreat at Crieff Hills. Crieff is a large area of land donated to the Presbyterian Church in Canada by theRead More →

I told you that I couldn’t capture all of Chicago in seven images…but fourteen doesn’t seem to work either. But anyways, for week 47 I decided to blow back to Chicago for a quick trip, mostly Chinatown but I did swing up into the Loop to take a visit to Central Camera (I needed fixer). Chinatown was fantastic, it felt very much like Toronto’s but with the Sears Tower looming overhead rather than the CN Tower, the same mix of north American and Asian influenced architecture (there was even a pagoda on the roof of a building). Not to mention tea shops, restaurants (I doRead More →

They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old: Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn. At the going down of the sun and in the morning, We will remember them. Week 46 fell on the week of Remembrance Day (Veterans Day for you in the US), November 11th marks the end of the First World War, and in Canada at the 11th Hour, on the 11th Month, on the 11th day we pause to remember them. I happened to find myself at the National Air Force Museum at Canadian Forces Base Trenton, in Trenton, ON is filled with theRead More →