On today’s episode, John is going to dig into one of his favourites if not rare and annoying cameras in his collection, the Kodak Medalist. A unique camera with a unique place in the history of camera equipment and the American photographic industry. The Medalist grew out of the need for a high-quality camera that was both robust and American built for the US Military. The year was 1939, World War Two had started with the Japanese invasion of mainland China and the Nazi invasion of eastern Europe. And while America remained neutral, war production cut off the source of high-quality cameras from these twoRead More →

There’s always a sense of wonder when working with cameras as old as the Jiffy Kodak. Despite the bellows, it is little more than a fancy dressed up box camera. And yet there is a strange draw to shooting with it; you can just shoot from the hip and hope it works out, and yet there are a few things in this dressed up box that creates a unique shooting experience. But first, I have to speak on how cool this camera is, despite lacking the art deco faceplate that gives the Jiffy Kodak an iconic look for the 1930s, like the Beau Brownie, theRead More →

The bakelite beast, the snap shot camera of the 1950s and a staple camera in most every antique camera store I’ve visited. The Brownie Hawkeye flash was one of many cheap Kodak snapshot cameras that was a staple of plenty of families and still stands up today as a solid starter 620 camera because you can actually use a 120 spool in the camera providing you have a 620 spool in the take up! But although it works, I really don’t recommend it, as you’ll often damage the film itself. The Dirt Make: Kodak Model: Brownie Hawkeye Flash Type: Point and Shoot Format: Medium FormatRead More →

I was always iffy about shooting 620 cameras, since when I first got into film photography finding 620 film was difficult, but the cameras were everywhere and many found their way into my collection. And to make matters worse the take up spool was missing. But let’s back up a bit and discuss, exactly what is 620 film? It was a film that was first introduced by Kodak in 1932 and continued being produced until 1995. But here’s a secret, it’s the exact same film stock as 120, same size and same backing paper, but it was the spool that was different. So if youRead More →