While the idea of cutting a channel to safely carry cargo and people across the Niagara Penisula was not a new one by the time William Hamilton Merritt came along and pushed the idea forward to completion, Merritt is the one credited with the concept. William’s father, Thomas Merritt served under Sir John Graves Simcoe in the Queen’s Rangers during the American Revolution. After the war ended Thomas and his wife Catharine Hamilton settled in Saint Johns, New Brunswick for some time. But the call of home beckoned and the two returned to Bedford, New York. In Bedford, on the 3rd of July 1795 thatRead More →

The lovely village of Queenston tucked away on the shores of the Niagara River, just below the Niagara Parkway and hidden in the shadow of the mighty heights. Although small, the village is no stranger to the stage of history. Almost 201 years ago it was the sight of an American invasion during the War of 1812, that saw the actions of General Isaac Brock and General Sheaffe drive away the invading force, and saw the death of Brock, in fact Brock and his Aide-Du-Campe are buried up on the Heights beneath the tallest military monuments in Canada. The Village was again occupied by AmericanRead More →

The American plan for the invasion of Upper Canada would be a simple one. A coordinated three-pronged attack that would strike at Fort Amherstburg in the West, Montreal in the East, and the Niagara Penisula in the center. But in the 19th-Century coordinating three attacks with such vast distances between them was impossible. The Americans also believed that the local population would welcome them as liberators, not invaders. The quick turnabout at Detroit proved this second part wrong. And while General Isaac Brock proved himself the Saviour of Upper Canada at Detroit he would soon face both his next challenge and his mortality. A PlaqueRead More →