If there is a singular piece of infrastructure that changed the course of an entire region of Ontario that piece is the Welland Canal. Today the massive ship channel that serves as an extension of the St. Lawerence Seaway has humble beginnings. Before the construction of any canal, the only way to move supplies between Lake Ontario and Lake Erie was using the Niagara River. The river proved to be a difficult route for the British. The first being proximity to the American guns at Fort Niagara the second being the wonder of Niagara Falls. It resulted in long portages often starting at Queenston. TheRead More →

I rather enjoy these little made up holidays and events for the photographic community. And you can thank the Internet for all this enjoyment and global networking that takes place. The brains behind World Film Photography Day is Lomography and while I didn’t bring out any of my toy cameras, the unsettled weather of late here in Southern Ontario I took out my Minolta Maxxum 9 with a newly acquired 50mm f/1.7 lens, and a fresh roll of Retro 400s. So no matter what condition the weather would throw me I’d be ready. Not wanting to waste too much time I headed down to myRead More →

Found in a dusty warehouse, based on where the film came from, Sweeden, Lomography promoted their Berlin 400 as an iconic cinematic film. 400-Speed, Black & White, and from East Germany. Well, that certainly narrowed it down to only one film, thankfully it is one that I did have planned to review at a later date, so why not discuss it under the Lomography Brand! The film, if you haven’t already guessed is ORWO N74, which made collecting developing formulas easy. Shooting cinematic film in still cameras is nothing new, at least for me, I still love shooting Double-X for urban work, so getting intoRead More →

You can’t discuss the history of the SLR without discussing the Pentax Spotmatic. And while the Spotmatic is no stranger to us here on Classic Camera Revival, we’ve been asked many times to look deeply into the camera, the system, and of course, the lenses. Today we have our two amazing Spotmatic Experts, Bill and Mike taking a deep look into the iconic camera and lenses. Camera Specs Make: Model: Pentax Spotmatic SP, SL, SPII, SP2a, F, ES, ESII Type: Single Lens Reflex Format: 135 (35mm), 24x36mm Lens: Interchangeable, Praktica Mount (M42) Years Manufactured: 1964-76 The Pentax Spotmatic cannot be held up as the originalRead More →

Upper Canada was a Province created by the influx of immigrants, from the first loyalists who arrived during and after the American Revolution. But they were not the only group who would make Upper Canada home. As the Province grew, many different groups such as Germans, English, Irish, Scottish, Americans, French, and those who came as slaves, arrived owing to the rich cultural mix that we in Ontario still enjoy today. And many of these cultures owe their presence in the country to these early pioneers who often faced harsh conditions to carve a living out of the wilderness that made up of most ofRead More →

Thinking back to what could have been, I remember when I first got into film photography, photography in general and happened across Minolta. The SR-T 102, Hi-Matic 7s, even the X-7a, but I wanted to make the jump to autofocus. I was in a local bargain shop and happened across an open box, the Maxxum 7. It didn’t come with a lens and was well outside my price range. And now that I know more about that shop, it was probably hot also. I ended up switching to Nikon. But here it is now, the Minolta Maxxum 7, what many online sites describe as theRead More →

There are many figured in our history that changed the course of Canadian History, think Sir John A. MacDonald, William Lyon MacKenzie, Robert Baldwin, Louis LaFontaine. However, all these men owe their contributions to a single person, Robert Gourlay. Gourlay’s presence in Upper Canada would ignite the spark of reform here in Upper Canada. Upper Canada in the early 19th-Century was a vast rural backwater. Urban centres were few and far between cities that we know today were little more than muddy villages in the middle of the vast forest. The undeveloped nature of the Province gave those in control, the colonial elite, access toRead More →

If anyone has read any of my classic film reviews, you’ll know I have a taste for out-of-production films, especially Kodak Plus-X and Panatomic-X. For several years I’ve participated in an event called Expired Film Day. This is an online celebration of shooting film past its due date and it usually is a single day, the 15th of March, but this year the mind behind it decided to give three days to get out and shoot. In the past, I’ve only gotten out and shot a single roll of film on that day, but now that I had three days to play I could getRead More →

We’re back on a large format kick just in time for spring to arrive here in Southern Ontario! So today, Large Format Strikes Back! Linhof Master Technika V When it comes to precision in large format you don’t get any better than a monorail camera, but what if you could get that same level in a more compact form. Enter the Linhof Technika line of cameras. These are a hybrid of the power of movement you get with a monorail camera in a package similar to a Press Camera. You get every movement in both your front and rear standards and not just any movement,Read More →

In Post-War British North America, the British authorities took a two-pronged approach to the defences of their North American holdings. The first through a series of upgrades to the defensive forts along the border and the bolstering of the British garrisons, the second would be to prevent another war through a series of negotiated agreements and treaties. The idea would be to shore up the start of better relationships and fill in the gaps left by the Treaty of Gent. If you have read the Treaty of Ghent and understand its context you’ll quickly realise Ghent could not be the final say for normal relationsRead More →