Anyone who has been in photography for a long time will remember the legendary Kodak film, no, not Kodachrome, the other one…Panatomic-X. Panatomic-X was first released in 1933 and continued until 1987 this fine grain ASA-32 panchromatic black & white film produced a huge tonal range and allowed for even 35mm negatives to be printed extremely large without noticeable grain…and when there was grain is was very pleasing. These days you cannot find fresh film, or even another film on the market like it. Most of the film I’ve shot expired back in the 1970s but can still be shot at box speed (ASA-32). TheRead More →

My car wound its way along the dusty road deep in Ontario’s cottage country; I knew where I was going, but it was based on probably outdated satellite imagery and information from someone whom I didn’t trust. But as I was in the area I decided to take a chance. The gates to the old Seven Mile Island property were wide open inviting me to come in, not a sign of life as I drove along the narrow track road along the shores of the lake. Oddly enough it began to remind me of the old children’s novel “Gone Away Lake” which was a favouriteRead More →

I wore a suit into Toronto for Canada Day, I was meeting up with a group of friends later on that day, but I took advantage of the beautiful weather and the bustle of the city to get some street photography in, and looking dapper there was only one choice in cameras, my Leica. I haven’t been giving my Leica love recently mostly because it’s a bit of a pain to use, bottom loading, cutting the film leader, making sure there’s enough tension so that the sprockets catch. But after some choice words I managed to load up a roll of classic Kodak Plus-X andRead More →

Fort Wellington is one of the many forts that helped defend Upper Canada during the War of 1812, but unlike many other forts of the era, Fort Wellington never saw a direct attack. By 1810 the small village of Prescott had been founded along the shores of the St. Lawrence River and the King’s Highway which ran between Montreal, Kingston, and York (Toronto). Prescott soon found importance in travel along the St. Lawrence as bateaux from Montreal, used to navigate the rapids, would be offloaded onto the larger lake freighters to continue onto Kingston, York, and the Niagara region. Fort Wellington is one of aRead More →

The first of many posts about the amazing mid-summer meetup I attended in northern Michigan. The event is called Photostock and hosted/organized by world renowned photographer Bill Schwab, who despite his world renownedness is a really cool down to earth humble guy who just wants to get other photographers inspired. And inspire me it did, to get back into the chemicals and restart developing my own black and white film, and to print…printing will come later, but I did find a place nearby that has rentable darkrooms so I will be printing again soon! But anyways, first, more Photostock. The event is held in theRead More →

Sometimes you just look up and see your first camera sitting there, the lens still shining as if new, and it begs you to be used. Well that happened recently, my very first camera, religated to my third shelf (were I place seldom used cameras, ones that work but have something off with them, or just cannot get the film anymore…), the Minolta Hi-Matic 7s, a five dollar garage sale find. All mechanical, the battery for the light meter long dead, but everything still works. So I dicided to take it out for a trip. Because I can. Minolta Hi-Matic 7s – Rokkor-PF 45mm 1:1.7Read More →

When you use Leica, Nikon, Carl Zeiss optics the idea of plastic lenses and “toy” cameras will often scare a photographer, you really don’t know what you’re going to be getting out of your image. It certainly won’t be the sharpest image on the block, vignetting is going to be there, soft focus, light leaks, all very possible. Add Expired film into the mix and things just start getting dicy. Something that many photographers won’t even touch, and I used to be like that…until I picked up, on a whim, a Holga from The Film Photography Project. And instantly was dragged into the wonderful worldRead More →

When you think of Niagara Falls, especially the tourist areas like Cliffton Hill and Lundy’s Lane one of the last things you think is a historic battleground. Today there’s an arch over Lundy’s Lane announcing what it is, but for the most part, it’s places like Fort George, Fort Erie, and Queenston Heights that get all the glory. But in 1814 a bloody battle at the cemetery on Lundy’s Lane changed the course of the American 1814 summer offensive. It was the turning point of the whole matter, and it didn’t go too well for the Americans after that. A memorial arch across Lundy’s LaneRead More →

When the United States of America declared war on the British Empire, they knew they could not go toe to toe with the might of the British Navy. Instead, they invaded the closest British held territory, Upper, and Lower Canada. Not all the citizens in the British-controlled colony were on the side of the Empire, many in fact supported the American invasion and wanted to see the British influences in North America removed. Some left Upper Canada for the USA, and some others chose to help the Americans on the Canadian side of the border. Most citizens of Upper Canada supported the British Forces, manyRead More →