Anyone who has read these reviews from the beginning knows I have a bit of a conflict with Bronica cameras. It’s not that they’re bad cameras, it’s just that for me there are too many small issues, minor annoyances that make me shy away from them. And the Bronica EC is no different, but it does come to the same point of almost earning a recommendation from me as the GS-1 does. At first glance, the EC has the look of an overgrown Kiev 88, a mechanical beast. However, that is far from the truth. As the EC in the name suggests, the camera isRead More →

If you’ve used any of the modern Bronica cameras, you’ve mostly used them all. And that is the beauty of them because of they all act, behave and feel the same in both operation and general, cosmetic details. The only difference is the size of the negative. And while I’ve reviewed the smaller of the three, the ETRS earlier this year, I now switch up to the largest of the three the GS-1. As I’ve mentioned before, I’m not a fan of Bronica cameras, but I like the GS-1 and would easily rate it higher than the Mamiya as it stands up easier on fieldRead More →

I have a love/hate relationship with Bronica cameras. If you listen to the Classic Camera Revival Podcast, I railed against the Bronica SQ-Am in episode 22, and I gave away my SQ-Ai because of ergonomic issues I had with the camera. But putting all that aside I went into shooting the ETRS with an open mind and discovered a rather fun camera. When it comes to 645 cameras, the ETRS is the real underdog while the Mamiya m645 and to a lesser extent the Pentax 645 get most of the glory. Which to people looking to crack into medium format the ETR line of camerasRead More →

Probably one of the best things to actually invest in with your camera kit is lenses, as the title says, marry your lenses, date your cameras. Once you’ve figured out what system you want to shoot with, invest in glass, so on this the first episode of our second season the gang talks about their favourite lenses! Glass Featured on Today’s Show… In 35mm… Canon FD Lens S.S.C. 50mm 1:1.4 – While on the surface this is just another 50mm FD Canon lens which are already a fantastic lens to shoot on all your FD mount cameras what sets this camera about is the SSCRead More →

6×6, 2.25×2.25, square format…no matter how you cut it, everyone loves a good square format negative, you can print it three different ways, square, portrait, or landscape, it’s big, it’s beautiful and there’s lots of awesome cameras out there that shoot in that format. Cameras featured on Today’s Show… Rolleiflex 3.5E3: One of the iconic Twin Lens Reflex cameras that feature some amazing optics. And even though it’s not a Zeiss Rolleiflex the results are just as good! Make: Franke & Heidecke Model: Rolleiflex 3.5 E3 Type: Twin Lens Reflex Format: Medium Format, 120, 6×6 Dates of Manufacture: 1961-1965 Rolleiflex 3.5E – Schneider-Kreuznack Xentar 75mmRead More →

Back in April at the FPP Walking Workshop I had the chance to work with some studio lights. One of the things to come out of the first round with the studio light was the Polaroid Portraits that I was very proud of. But on the Sunday before the Large Format workshop kicked off I again hooked up one of my cameras to the same light and with the help of Professor Jeff got all the settings landed and began to pull people who were in attendance into my studio for a quick shot. Loaded into my camera was a single roll of Kodak PortraRead More →

Fort Stephenson was a sleepy supply depot fort built under the orders of General William Henry Harrison after he gained command of the Army of the Northwest in 1813. Fort Stephenson’s task was to guard the Sandusky River. The fort consisted of a palisade wall with three blockhouses. By the summer of 1813 was under the command of the young Major George Croghan, and a garrison of 160 regulars from the 17th and 24th US Infantry, along with the local militia. The Original memorial plaque to the Battle of Fort Stephenson After the failure of the second British assault in early July of 1813 againstRead More →

After the fall of Detroit to General Brock in the summer of 1812 the British moved quickly to establish a beachhead in the northwest to ensure the security of Upper Canada, and to hold the territory to fulfill a promise to their native allies that it would become their own country at the end of the war (should the British win). The capture of Detroit also put a halt to the planned invasion of Upper Canada from the west. President Madison replaced General Hull as the commander of the Army of the Northwest for the near bloodless capture of Detroit. He first put General WinchesterRead More →