No, I’m not talking about real gas, but rather G.A.S, or Gear Acquisition Syndrom. It’s a common problem among many hobbies, but for the most part, it affects photographers, that is photographers who use film based cameras. These days shooting film is pretty sweet, there’s a huge used market where many cameras once thought to be out of reach of even beginner photographers are now easily purchased. When I got my first Nikon, the F80, it was the F5 I wanted, and now I got one for under a thousand, and a Hasselblad for 500. But herein lies the problem, we often find ourselves surroundedRead More →

Sometimes it just feels good to let it all out and that’s exactly what we’re doing! The gang clears the air and discusses the cameras they love to hate along with the film stocks they aren’t too pleased in as well! Cameras Featured on Today’s Show… Bonica SQ-Am – Now Alex already has a love/hate relationship with the Bronica SQ system, but the SQ-Am takes the cake for him. The camera is loud bulky and chews through batteries like they were ancient NiCad rechargeables. Who integrates a motor drive on a 6×6 SLR anyways! The Dirt: Make: Bronica Model: SQ-Am Type: Single Lens Reflex Format:Read More →

We recently posted a link to our Facebook page about the top twenty-two vintage cameras to buy and it generated a lot of discussion about the article. And while we agreed (mostly) on the cameras on the list we felt that there were some better choices for vintage gear that you should buy. So this month we’re giving you the Classic Camera Revival Top Twenty Vintage Cameras to buy! In no particular order… Nikon F2 – This mechanical beauty won’t let you down whatever model you pickup! Pentax 645 – Simple, Easy, Great way to get into Medium Format without breaking the bank Nikon FMRead More →

These days the two big camera names that see fanboys (and girls) in both camps is Cannon vs. Nikon. But that wasn’t always the case. In the 1950s Nikon and Canon were still fairly unknown in the pro-market, both were producing rangefinder cameras stamped with “Made in occupied Japan” the real competitors of the 1950s was Contax and Leica. Since I have both a Leica IIIc and a Contax IIIa I figured I should do a side by side comparison and have these two heavy-weights of the mid-century fight it out. Before you continue, I suggest reading by reviews of each camera, first the ContaxRead More →

Coming off the last bicentennial reenactment in Canada and a trip to Texas looming next week I figured I needed something quick and dirty for Week 43 so I decided to give a little bit of still life a try with two of jewels of my working collection. A 1950 Leica IIIc and a 1969 Rolleiflex 2.8F all nicely posed with some APX25 and Ilford Delta 400, the film actually is for my Texas trip, the cameras will be staying home (As I have my Pentax 645 and Nikon F4 packed up for the trip). But it was the first time for me working withRead More →

Located on a sleepy treelined street in Ann Arbor Michigan in an old building is a museum, while not large, holds a piece of Americana, the Argus Museum. I was inspired by Mark O’Brien who mentioned this museum on Episode 108 of the Film Photography Podcast and decided to take a trip to visit on my way home from Ohio on the August Long Weekend. One of the neat features of the museum is where it’s located, not just Ann Arbor, but in the original buildings that the cameras were made in. That’s right, instead of demolishing or letting them fall apart (which would’ve beenRead More →

So now that you know what a camera let’s get down to business, the next most important part of the camera is the lens. This is what focuses the light into the camera body and onto the medium capturing that light. Lenses can be at the very top broken down into two categories, those are prime and zoom. A Prime lens is one with a fixed focal length, such as 50mm, 105mm, 200mm. A Zoom lens has a variable focal length, such as 18-55mm, 70-200mm, 17-35mm. A lenses focal length is usually measured in milimeters (mm) but you will often find some marked in centimetersRead More →

The camera. A camera is a device that allows light to be captured on a sensitive media. All cameras operate on this same principle, from the first cameras in the 19th century to the one on your cellphone. Sure, the technology has changed since the first perminant photo was captured in 1829. So what is a camera, how does it all work….it’s actually pretty simple, light is reflected off an object, travels through a lens, and strikes a light senstive media. Yes, it’s that simple. The complex part is all the different cameras that we have avalible today… The Point & Shoot A point andRead More →

As I was reading through the latest PHSC news letter I came across a neat little article that I’m shamelessly re-publishing here. George Dunbar found this piece of news in the Modern Mechanix magazine of June 1932. It showed the latest development of an electric camera that worked without film, before the digital age. It is described as a revolutionary camera developed by Mr. K. Wilcke, a German scientist. Light enters the camera and strikes a glass plate, on which is a very fine coating of a metal-like platinum or gold. It is so fine that it will permit the passage of light. Backed upRead More →