Thinking back to what could have been, I remember when I first got into film photography, photography in general and happened across Minolta. The SR-T 102, Hi-Matic 7s, even the X-7a, but I wanted to make the jump to autofocus. I was in a local bargain shop and happened across an open box, the Maxxum 7. It didn’t come with a lens and was well outside my price range. And now that I know more about that shop, it was probably hot also. I ended up switching to Nikon. But here it is now, the Minolta Maxxum 7, what many online sites describe as theRead More →

By far my favourite of all the Delta films (which isn’t hard, there are only three) and my favourite of the mid-speed Modern Films (Delta, TMax etc.). Delta 100 is what I expect from a modern film, sharp, fine-grained, and can do anything you want it to without any major issues. Unlike the faster films, this one can work with pretty much any developer I throw it in and loves any lighting situations. And while as an indoor film it can suffer from rather harsh reciprocity failure, if done right, you don’t have to worry. Film Specs Type: Panchromatic B&W Film Base: Acetate Film Speed:Read More →

If you’ve used any of the modern Bronica cameras, you’ve mostly used them all. And that is the beauty of them because of they all act, behave and feel the same in both operation and general, cosmetic details. The only difference is the size of the negative. And while I’ve reviewed the smaller of the three, the ETRS earlier this year, I now switch up to the largest of the three the GS-1. As I’ve mentioned before, I’m not a fan of Bronica cameras, but I like the GS-1 and would easily rate it higher than the Mamiya as it stands up easier on fieldRead More →

Another new developer for me and when I find a new developer I’m usually excited to see how different films react to it. And to make it even sweeter the Kodak equivalent, DK-50, is a developer I had never even heard of until now! According to the Ilford Product page this is a fine grain developer designed for push processing faster films. So for slow and medium speed films I chose to shoot at box speed, while faster films I went and did some pushing. With Ilford FP4+ In all honesty you really can’t go wrong with FP4, this is one of those films thatRead More →

I’m not often one for an underdog but this camera happened to draw me in when I first saw it and handled a T3 that my buddy James had gotten and this camera with a lens was just the right price. And while not probably my most favourite camera I’ve used through this series, the lenses are amazing and a system I’ll probably add to if just for the glass to use on a digital camera. The Dirt Make: Konica Model: Autoreflex T4 Type: 35mm, Single Lens Reflex Lens: Interchangable, Konica Bayonet Mount II (AR Mount) Year Manufactured: 1978 The Good The Hexanon lenses areRead More →

The Yashica FR-I is another one of those late 20th century 35mm SLR, based on the Yashica FR and Contax RTS it’s an aperture priority camera which already gives it a plus in my books. And with the C/Y mount you have a pile of great lenses available. However the camera itself has, at least for me, some usability issues that really turned me off the camera as a whole. The Dirt Make: Yashica Model: FR-I Type: 35mm, Single Lens Reflex Lens: Interchangeable, Contax/Yashica Mount Years Manufactured: 1977-1981 The Good Over all this is a comfortable camera to work with, clean lines, nice big shutterRead More →

While generally an underdog camera in the 6×4.5 market, the Pentax 645 is by far my favourite of all the cameras within the line. Probably because you don’t see many of them kicking around. I know of only three other photographers in my area that use the camera. But unlike its contemporaries this wasn’t a system camera. You got the body and that was it there was little you could do. But because of that you got a camera that had a built in light meter, motordrive, and grip. Plus the backing of some fantastic optics! While a bit bulky the Pentax 645 is aRead More →

You may think you’re looking at a Leica, and you would be partially correct. During the Second World War the Red Army carried back to the Soviet Block the contents of many factories that were in Germany, including photographic technology, equipment, and parts. Even colour film technology was removed from Agfa’s plant. So when you see not only Fed and Zorki cameras they are infact direct clones of Leica model cameras. Often being manufactured at less cost but suffered from one thing…quality control. It may look like a Leica, but it sure isn’t one. And in someways it’s a bit better! The Dirt Maker: FEDRead More →

Designed as the camera for Youth (Smena or ϹМЕНА roughly translated is Young Generation or Relay), the Smena 8m was a staple camera from the Leningrad Optical-Mechanical Union (LOMO) that really was the most basic of cameras out there. This simple viewfinder camera will either delight or frustrate you as it can be fairly complex to work with, which is rather odd since it was a Youth camera. The ϹМЕНА 8M the strangest chunk of plastic the ruble can buy The Dirt Maker: Lomo (ЛОМО) Model: Smena 8m (ϹМЕНА 8M) Type: 35mm Viewfinder Lens: Fixed, Lomo T-43 4/40 (T-43 4/40 ЛОМО) Year of Manufacture: 1970-1995Read More →

Olympus seems to have a way of creating cult cameras and the Trip 35 is no different, this is a fantastic compact and fully automated camera that can fit in a pocket or bag. But don’t let the size give it away, the Trip 35 produces fantastic sharp images mostly thanks to the fantasic Zuiko lens. It’s a great way to get quality images in a compact camera. The Dirt Maker: Olympus Model: Trip 35 Type: 35mm Point & Shoot Zone Focus Lens: Fixed, Olympus D.Zuiko f=40mm 1:2.8 (Tessar Design) Year of Manufacture: 1967-1984 The Good No batteries here, the fully automated system can beRead More →