It all started when I was asked to test some new motion picture film for the Film Photography Project, and I found a new favourite slow film…that film is Eastman 5363 Positive Film II. A high contrast motion picture film specifically designed for the creation of titles and can be processed as a positive film or a negative film. But could it be used for regular pictorial work. I immediately got to work on shooting and making some developing choices. While I have written about this film a few times before I’ll be working my way from the beginning to the end of my experimentationRead More →

Another care package of new film stocks arrived from the FPP recently, some Russian Films, Japanese and two Kodak rolls, one being the fantastic Eastman 5363! Although my last test roll ended up in failure (Rodinal 1+100, stand developed for an hour). I was looking forwarding to trying another formula. By this point the gang had decided that ASA-25 was the optimal speed for this film. I’ve seen lots of examples popping up on Flickr with D-76 (1+1), Xtol (1+1), HC-110 Dilution G, even some home brewed positive developing with Dektol as a second developer. The Secord home in Queenston, ON But what about PMKRead More →

Back in December I was approached by Michael Raso of the Film Photography Project if I wanted to help test a new (to the FPP) film stock. Just before Christmas the film arrived with a little note saying “ASA-6, we think” there was no real indication online how to develop this film in traditional B&W chemistry or it’s exact sensitivity. Google yielded a document by Eastman Kodak on this film stock, Eastman 5363 Positive Film II was a high contrast motion picture film designed for the creation of both positive and negative titles for films. And to develop using Kodak’s D-97 chemistry. Last time IRead More →