We all need that little bit extra, that extra stop, that extra degree. For that, we pick up the heavy hitters, the big glass in our camera kits. If you’re someone who is an ultra-wide junky (Lens 24mm or wider) or wants only a sliver of your frame in focus (Lenses with apertures at f/1.4 or faster), this episode is for you! Konica-Minolta Maxxum AF 17-35mm 1:2.8-4 D When it comes to wide-angle lenses, Alex is a bit of a junkie, so when he found this beautiful lens for his Maxxum system he didn’t think twice. Now there are two versions of this lens, there’sRead More →

The second colour motion picture film stock available from our friends at Cinestill. Like Cinestill 800T, Cinestill 50D is based on Kodak’s Vision3 50D, a slow colour film designed for outdoor work, hence the D in the name standing for daylight. The film has been pre-stripped of the remjet layer allowing for easier processing in labs and at home. Although like 800T the film is natively designed for Kodak’s ECN-2 process, that’s an expensive process, so I decided instead to go with the old standby Burlington Camera. Now I did shoot this film stock back in 2018 and had it processed C-41 and was blownRead More →

When you’re in a situation and your reputation is on the line you need something that works. But if the customer, client, or even your own personal project is on the line and you have to use film, then you want something that will work. Like work always, in any situation! Ilford FP4+ If you miss the ASA-125 rating of Kodak Plus-X, then look no further than Ilford FP4+. A film that dates back to the 1930s and has changed and grown as technology improved. FP4+ is Alex’s choice for outdoor shooting when the light is nice, even if cloudly. It responds well to beingRead More →

Before we get into all this, let me start by staying Ortho Plus is not a new film, it’s just now available in different formats. Originally I shot a box of the stuff in 4×5 when it was only available in sheet format, and it was the first film that I shot that had no real rating set. In fact, most entries for developing times on the massive dev chart simply had a question mark for the ISO rating. I found that this gave me a lot more latitude when working with the film. I could rate it higher or lower depending on the situationRead More →

When it comes to game-changing cameras there is nothing more iconic than the Olympus OM-1, it ushered in the small format for the SLR world, and not to be outdone by Olympus, Pentax released their versions of the small SLR, the first two being the MX and the ME. But the ME had a lot of limitations including the lack of a manual mode, enter the ME Super. I’ve had both a ME and ME Super come through my collection in the past, one went to a friend (not sure if she still uses or even has it) and the ME Super met its endRead More →

The film that started the whole Svema craze with the Film Photography Project, Svema Foto 200. Свема is a film stock that is relatively unknown here in North America unless you are of course fans of the Film Photography Podcast. The name comes from the combination of two Russian words, Светочувствительные Материалы, translated means Photosensitive Materials. While Svema collapsed when the Soviet Union died in the 1990s, another Eastern European film manufacture, Astrum, continues the legacy of Svema using some of the old machinery in a new factory in Shostka, Ukraine. Now I did try a roll or two of Foto 200 when it firstRead More →

I had been scrolling through Pinterest several months ago when I happened across an article, 10 Reasons You Must Shoot Film. As a film shooter, I was curious and clicked the link. It was the usual clickbait filled with all the typical items you’d find in such an article. Things about how it helps you improve, makes you slow down, and all that jazz. Of course, I began to see more articles of the same type in my feed after that, so I decided to write a rebuttal. Before I get into that, I am an avid film photographer as you can easily tell byRead More →

When it comes to cameras there are many that hold a place in photographic history and in the case of Twin Lens Cameras, there are many that stand out as a fixed point in development history. And in the case of the twin-lens reflex camera market than Franke & Heidecke. Paul Franke and Reinhold Heidecke established the company in 1920 as an optical instrument manufacture, but they moved quickly into cameras and began to develop what would become the industry standard for TLR cameras. Now the TLR is not a new concept the first one being produced in 1880, but the two Germans were aboutRead More →

We’ve discussed large format on several occasions on CCR in the past, however, we’ve never done a basics episode for those wanting to get into large format. Well never fear, that is exactly what Alex and James are going to discuss today, so grab your notebook and ready to go big! Camera Types You can put all large format cameras into a single category of ‘large format’ or simply ‘view camera’ because you are mostly using a piece of ground glass to look directly through the lens so it’s almost what you see is what you get. However, there are differences between these view camerasRead More →

When it comes to a winning colour film for the modern film age, look no further than Kodak Portra 400. The stock, a combination of the best of the older VC and NC stocks, the film burst onto the scene as part of the early film resurgence from Kodak. When it comes to fast colour films and money is no object then you want to shoot Portra 400, it’s like the Tri-X of the colour film world, you can push and pull the film all you want, even on the same roll! Which makes it in my mind the perfect film for digital shooters toRead More →