The penultimate battle of the War of 1812, at least in the eyes of the Americans, and the final big battle in the entire war. By the middle of November 1814 the war in Upper Canada had all but finished for the campaign season, in Ghent the negotiations for peace continued, and if they went well, war would not return. But for the United States the war was far from over and far closer to home. Everything that the government feared would happen with Napoleon’s abdication happened. In June of 1814 a force under General John Sherbroke captured 100 miles of coastline in what wouldRead More →

I’m not talking about a camera here but rather an odd Kodak Film that seems to have created a little cult around it. That film is Kodak Hawkeye Traffic Surveillance Film 2486. Described on the Kodak site as being a 400 speed colour negative film that can be processed in C-41 chemistry. A T-Grain (similar to TMax films), 2 stops under, 3 stops over latitude and excellent push performance to ASA-800. Improved Colour Saturation with fine grain and high sharpness. Wait…this film sounds like a merger between Kodak Portra 400 and Kodak Ektar 100. Well it certainly performs like it! I got this roll ofRead More →

It wouldn’t be a 52-project from me without something from Findlay! Anyone who has attended an Film Photography Project meetup in lovely downtown Findlay, Ohio will immidiatly recognize this beautiful building. The Hancock County Courthouse was constructed between 1886 and 1888 to replace an older brick structure that once sat on the same site. This came about when Findlay was decided to be the seat of Hancock county. Constructed in three styles, Palladium, Victorian, and a favourite of mine, Richardson Romanesque, the building certainly strikes anyone who visits the downtown. If you get a chance or are driving past, stop by. The Irish pub isRead More →

While most of the actions of the War of 1812 took place along the border between the Canadas and the United States, there was a series of native raids in the southern reaches of the Northwest and Indiana Territories. The native allied, stirred into action by the successes of their British Allies in the north proceeded to lay siege to several American forts such as Forts Harrison and Wayne throughout the fall of 1812. But when General William Henry Harrison took command of the Army of the Northwest following Hull’s removal after his loss at Detroit. The old hand at dealing with the native threatRead More →

So the rather odd title comes from a story a friend tells of a D&D (Dungeon’s & Dragons) match where one of the players doesn’t actually know what a Gazebo is, and proceeds to think it a mystical creature, the DM (Dungeon Master) fed up by the player informs him that the Gazebo comes awake and kills him. Don’t worry, this gazebo is asleep and hasn’t been pushed into action. Yet. But after several weeks of wanderings I’ve come back home here for week 48 and the gazebo that sits out over the Mill Pond. Also this happens to be where the town of MiltonRead More →

Control of the lakes were key during the War of 1812 as the fastest way to move troops, equipment, and supplies was by water. Most the roads in the Canadas and the US weren’t the super highways we know today, they were nothing more than dirt roads that would easily become mud pits in the snow and rain. To maintain control of the lakes both sides maintained squadrons of ships that could keep the enemy pinned in their own bases. Unlike Lake Erie which was controlled first by the British because the US Naval Squadron had been captured in 1812 after Brock captured Detroit, andRead More →

I was always iffy about shooting 620 cameras, since when I first got into film photography finding 620 film was difficult, but the cameras were everywhere and many found their way into my collection. And to make matters worse the take up spool was missing. But let’s back up a bit and discuss, exactly what is 620 film? It was a film that was first introduced by Kodak in 1932 and continued being produced until 1995. But here’s a secret, it’s the exact same film stock as 120, same size and same backing paper, but it was the spool that was different. So if youRead More →

Dull skies, snow dancing in the air, yep winter has finally come to southern Ontario. Week 47 I found myself driving home from Ottawa. Having discovered this lovely scene back in September in Merreckville, Ontario. One of several communities that dot the length of the Rideau Canal. Completed in 1832 under the watchful eye of Colonel John By. The Canal, constructed to link the Ottawa River and Lake Ontario, was meant to transport military supplies and personnel away from the American guns on the US side of the St. Lawrence River. Thankfully the canal never had to be used to move troops around, but remainsRead More →

I was very happy that I was able to make it down to New Orleans during the bicentennial years of the War of 1812, even though I cut it awefully close. But here he is, immortalized in Jackson Square, President Andrew Jackson. Jackson was the general in command of the defense of New Orleans during the British assault on the city, which through his actions and poor planning and leadership on the British side won the battle for the Americans and propelled Jackson to the office of the President. And here he sits still today very close to the French Quarter. I wish I hadRead More →

In the years preceding the first world war a new sort of arms race was looming, the battleship. One specific battleship, HMS Dreadnought, the first all big gun battleship in the Royal Navy. Soon all other powers were scrambling to match the size, armour, and armament of the Dreadnought. The United States Navy was not immune to this new global arms race. Sadly today most of these awesome displays of naval power are long gone, include the lead ship, the Dreadnought herself, but one still remains. The New York Class Battleship USS Texas. Construction of the Texas began in 1911, launched in 1912 and commissionedRead More →