“Are you going for the game?” The US Border services agent’s question jostled the brain slightly more awake. The coffee a couple of hours had helped but waking up at 4 am was certainly something I haven’t done in a while. Thankfully that wouldn’t hit me until the way home. I proceeded to explain that I was going to Ann Arbor for a photo walk; at least I didn’t say “What game?” (What shoo?). I then had to explain what a photo walk was. The day started at the local camera shop, Camera Mall who were wonderful hosts for not only opening early but providingRead More →

Film can be expensive and learning how to shoot film isn’t exactly the easiest on the pocket book, there’s plenty of ways to mess up. And that six dollar roll of Kodak Tri-X can turn into a clear piece of acetate by messing up several different ways. But thanks to my good friends over at the Film Photography Podcast you can now test/learn/play with film and not have to spend too much money. As they’re now releasing their EDU line of film! There are three different flavours available, in 100, 200, and 400 speed films. I recently had a chance to test out all threeRead More →

It’s been a long time coming, but I’ve finally had a chance to work through some backlogged film testing for the Film Photography Project. For the most part, this has been testing the Russian/Ukrainian film stocks from the Svema company. This is actually a really good film! First off a little background, Svema, or Свема, combines the first letters of two words: Светочувствительные Материалы, which translated means “Photosensitive Materials”. Svema was the Kodak of the USSR, founded in 1931 the company produced paper and black & white films, after World War Two, Svema gained Agfa’s colour technology when the Russians overran Germany and took theRead More →

I’m not talking about a camera here but rather an odd Kodak Film that seems to have created a little cult around it. That film is Kodak Hawkeye Traffic Surveillance Film 2486. Described on the Kodak site as being a 400 speed colour negative film that can be processed in C-41 chemistry. A T-Grain (similar to TMax films), 2 stops under, 3 stops over latitude and excellent push performance to ASA-800. Improved Colour Saturation with fine grain and high sharpness. Wait…this film sounds like a merger between Kodak Portra 400 and Kodak Ektar 100. Well it certainly performs like it! I got this roll ofRead More →

It wouldn’t be a 52-project from me without something from Findlay! Anyone who has attended an Film Photography Project meetup in lovely downtown Findlay, Ohio will immidiatly recognize this beautiful building. The Hancock County Courthouse was constructed between 1886 and 1888 to replace an older brick structure that once sat on the same site. This came about when Findlay was decided to be the seat of Hancock county. Constructed in three styles, Palladium, Victorian, and a favourite of mine, Richardson Romanesque, the building certainly strikes anyone who visits the downtown. If you get a chance or are driving past, stop by. The Irish pub isRead More →

I was always iffy about shooting 620 cameras, since when I first got into film photography finding 620 film was difficult, but the cameras were everywhere and many found their way into my collection. And to make matters worse the take up spool was missing. But let’s back up a bit and discuss, exactly what is 620 film? It was a film that was first introduced by Kodak in 1932 and continued being produced until 1995. But here’s a secret, it’s the exact same film stock as 120, same size and same backing paper, but it was the spool that was different. So if youRead More →

It all started when I was asked to test some new motion picture film for the Film Photography Project, and I found a new favourite slow film…that film is Eastman 5363 Positive Film II. A high contrast motion picture film specifically designed for the creation of titles and can be processed as a positive film or a negative film. But could it be used for regular pictorial work. I immediately got to work on shooting and making some developing choices. While I have written about this film a few times before I’ll be working my way from the beginning to the end of my experimentationRead More →

Special Thanks to FPP’s Mark Dalzell for this week’s guest camera! You see them all over universities, little memorials, gifts, and the such. The University of Findlay in lovely Findlay, Ohio is no different, and this week’s subject is one such memorials. This is actually the restored bell that once sat in the tower of the Old Main building. It was given as a gift to the university fully restored and mounted on a new tower from the classes of 1953 and 2003. I thankfully was able to meetup with the FPP gang at Findlay to catch the final day of Walking Workshop after aRead More →

Another care package of new film stocks arrived from the FPP recently, some Russian Films, Japanese and two Kodak rolls, one being the fantastic Eastman 5363! Although my last test roll ended up in failure (Rodinal 1+100, stand developed for an hour). I was looking forwarding to trying another formula. By this point the gang had decided that ASA-25 was the optimal speed for this film. I’ve seen lots of examples popping up on Flickr with D-76 (1+1), Xtol (1+1), HC-110 Dilution G, even some home brewed positive developing with Dektol as a second developer. The Secord home in Queenston, ON But what about PMKRead More →

Back in December I was approached by Michael Raso of the Film Photography Project if I wanted to help test a new (to the FPP) film stock. Just before Christmas the film arrived with a little note saying “ASA-6, we think” there was no real indication online how to develop this film in traditional B&W chemistry or it’s exact sensitivity. Google yielded a document by Eastman Kodak on this film stock, Eastman 5363 Positive Film II was a high contrast motion picture film designed for the creation of both positive and negative titles for films. And to develop using Kodak’s D-97 chemistry. Last time IRead More →