Tag: historic

Summer Film Party – Part III (August)

Summer Film Party – Part III (August)

Some time back I came across a sponsored post on Facebook. Now usually when I see these I tend to scroll past them, but the title grabbed my attention, 14 Towns In Ontario To Visit If You’re Too Broke To Go To Europe. While many of the sites mentioned in the article I had heard of and visited there were a couple that caught my eye, the one that I decided would be worth a visit is Almonte, Ontario.

Rushing Waters

Building on the Old

Having done a weekend wedding in Bobcaygeon, Ontario and the wife and I heading to a week’s vacation in Ottawa it was the perfect chance to visit this small historic town. It turns out the man behind Basketball, Dr. James Naismith, so my wife, who is a big fan of basketball. While Polypan F is no longer produced, I still had a roll left waiting for something special. So, why not use it for the final month of the Summer Film Party!

Water Power

Historic Town Hall

For some reason, the telltale glow that comes with the film wasn’t too present in this roll; maybe it was a combination of things. The pull to ASA-25, the yellow filter, or the Rodinal for developing. Heck, it could have even been the high-noon sun I was shooting in. Either way, the results are great in my mind.

Hydro

Tail Race

Wow, this is the last post for the Summer Film Party, I managed to get in all three months of this wonderful little project for Emulsive, of course, now you can stay tuned for their next project the #DeltaDefJam, and I already have a lovely roll of Delta 100 in 35mm waiting! Until next time film shooters, keep those shutter firing!

All Photos Shot in Almonte, Ontario
Nikon F2 Photomic – AI-S Nikkor 35mm 1:2.8 (Yellow-12) – Polypan F @ ASA-25
Blazinal (1+50) 8:30 @ 20C

A Day Trip to Elora

A Day Trip to Elora

A few weekends back I had a chance to visit the lovely village of Elora, Ontario with my beautiful wife who I am grateful loves such adventures on free weekends. The small village is located just northwest of Guelph and offers a little taste of Europe in Ontario. I’ve had the chance to visit Elora twice in the past, once for my 52-Roll project in 2013 and again to go camping with a group of friends in 2015. But I had always planned to go back yet it never seemed to fit into plans. While the Elora gorge is one of the towns biggest draw, I’m a creature of the urban environment, so the historic downtown is my favourite place to visit in towns like this one. Often filled with fun little shops, a pub, even a brewery. But enough of me talking, let’s get to some of the photos from the day! Of course, if you ever find yourself in Elora, Ontario I do recommend visiting the Elora Brewing Company and stay for a meal and if you’re into it a beer. I recommend the Lady Friend IPA; it’s the way an IPA is supposed to taste and fellow photographer and craft beer enthusiast, Bill Smith, agrees.

Elora, Ontario - July 2017

Elora, Ontario - July 2017

Elora, Ontario - July 2017

Elora, Ontario - July 2017

Elora, Ontario - July 2017

Elora, Ontario - July 2017

Elora, Ontario - July 2017

Elora, Ontario - July 2017

All Photos Taken in Elora and Fergus, Ontario, Canada
Rolleiflex 2.8F – Carl Zeiss Planar 80mm 1:2.8 (Yellow-12) – Kodak Verichrome Pan @ ASA-125
Ilford Microphen (1+1) 8:30 @ 20C

Summer Film Party – Part II (July)

Summer Film Party – Part II (July)

One of the best parts of being a historical reenactor is that you often get a chance to visit and stay in some of Canada’s historic sites, and many find their home in some of the beautiful towns in the province. And while it can be hit and miss along the Niagara River, Fort George in the picturesque Niagara-On-The-Lake, Ontario is certainly one such site. Having an event there during the July edition of the Summer Film Party offered me a chance to shoot in the historic walls of Fort George, a site deep in military history.

Heavy Motar

The Small Block House

Both the fort and the town have a long history in Ontario. The town has its beginnings in 1781 as Butlersburg, named for the men of a loyalist irregular unit, Butler’s Rangers from the American War of Independence. And the Butler family would continue to live in the town well into the 19th-Century, their farm seeing a small action during the Anglo-American War of 1812. It would soon take on the name West Niagara. When General John Graves Simcoe assumed the role of Lieutenant-Governor of Upper Canada, he established West Niagara as the capital of the new colony in 1792, renaming the settlement to Newark. The small town would soon find itself home to the headquarters of the British Army of the Center at Fort George. The Upper Canada Parliament would meet at Newark until 1796 when Simcoe moved the capital to York (now Toronto, Ontario).

A Spring in his Step

Brock's First Resting Place

While my days at the fort filled with musketry, cleaning, drill, and lazing about as a good British soldier would do (when ordered to of course). It left the mornings to take out the Hasselblad and shoot, the soft morning light providing fantastic light to one of the largest 1812-era forts in Ontario. From the historic buildings (mostly rebuilt in the 1930s) to the original powder magazine that survived these 200 years, and of course, the flurry of morning activity as the reenactors cleaned up their brass and muskets from the night before, getting things ready for the pomp and battle for the day to come.

Getting the Polish On

Taking the Polish

The small town continued to grow and was the preferred town for Major General Isaac Brock during his time as the commander of the British Regular forces during the period leading up to the Anglo-American War of 1812 until his death in October 1812. Brock would even be buried at Fort George before his reinterment at Brock’s Monument on Queenston Heights. The town and fort would see capture in May 1813, and the American occupation lasted until December of that year and saw the destruction of the fort and the town. This would lead to the retaliatory capture of Fort Niagara and the destruction of many small villages and Buffalo before the new year arrived. When the town rebuilt, they shifted the location ever so slightly to ensure it was out of range of the American guns across the river.

1st (Royal Scots) Lights

Bass Drummer's Shako

The name, Niagara-On-The-Lake would be formally adopted in 1880, and would slowly become known as a popular tourist destination both for wine and theater aficionados. The surrounding wine country offers some familiar Ontario wineries and now has an active craft beer brewing industry. And the town has many theaters to perform plays during the Shaw Festival. If you ever find yourself in the town, be sure to visit the Angel Inn, a fantastic pub, a walking tour of downtown and be sure to visit both Fort George and Fort Mississauga on opposite ends of the downtown. That was July, but there’s still one more month to get on the Summer Film Party Bus! It’s going to take my lovely wife and I out to the National Capital area and the Ottawa River Valley and the small town of Almonte, Ontario and some of my favourite motion picture stocks, Eastman 5363!

All Photos Taken at Fort George National Historic Site
Niagara-On-The-Lake, Ontario, Canada
Hasselblad 500c – Carl Zeiss Planar 80mm 1:2.8 – Ilford Pan F+ @ ASA-50
Ilford Microphen (1+1) 6:00 @ 20C

A Cold Day on James Street

A Cold Day on James Street

For the past several years I’ve been working on a series of photo projects that usually resulted in me going out to shoot on a regular basis but for project reasons. But this year, despite still going out and shooting film for camera reviews I’ve started just taking cameras out for the pure reason of going out to shoot for my enjoyment.

LUiNA Station

A Fountain

And while I had brought a camera to review with me, and my 4×5 along for this month’s TMAX Party I did get out and do some shooting for just me. Having shot the Hasselblad once a week every week last year I’ve been letting it sit for a bit on my shelves while I played with other cameras through the first couple months. But I thought it would survive a rather cold Saturday morning in Hamilton while Heather was at a baby shower for my future sister-in-law.

Pig in the Window

Rusted Out

So while Heather was up on the mountain, I took a wander along James Street. While there is always much to see in downtown Hamilton I, usually stick to the same box and area. So this time I wandered a bit further afield along James Street towards the waterfront. While there were many familiar sites once I got past the Christ Cathedral, they were no longer too familiar, and I finally got to see the beautiful LUiNA Station. A former train station turned event venue.

Little India

Opposing Doors

The weather it turned out was a little colder than I expected and by the time I got back to my car I was pretty uncomfortable, and so was my 4×5 that had been sitting inside the car so the other four sheets of film would have to wait for warmer weather. But I was happy with the results I got from the Hasselblad.


Hasselblad 500c – Carl Zeiss Distagon 50mm 1:4 – Fomapan 100 @ ASA-100
Blazinal (1+50) 9:00 @ 20C
Meter: Gossen Lunasix F
Scanner: Epson V700
Editor: Adobe Photoshop CC (2017)

CCR Review 58 – Graflex Pacemaker Crown Graphic

CCR Review 58 – Graflex Pacemaker Crown Graphic

At the very beginning of these review blogs I had laid out some rules, and now I’m going to break one of them and review a large format, sheet film camera. The Crown Graphic is my 4×5 camera of choice these days; it’s reliable camera that can take a hit and keep on taking photos. I mean that is what it’s designed to do, it’s a press camera. And when it comes to large format, I’m glad that my first experiences with the format were on a press camera rather than a field or monorail because I don’t think I would have taken to the format in the same way.

CCR Review 58 - Graflex Pacemaker Crown Graphic

The Dirt

  • Make: Graflex
  • Model: Pacemaker Crown Graphic
  • Type: Press Camera, View/Rangefinder
  • Format: Multiple, Graflok Back (Roll film, or Sheet Film)
  • Len: Interchangeable, Crown Graphic Lens Boards
  • Year of Manufacture: 1955-1973 (This Model, 1968)

CCR Review 58 - Graflex Pacemaker Crown Graphic

CCR Review 58 - Graflex Pacemaker Crown Graphic

The Good
The number one thing I love about the Crown Graphic is that it’s versatile with a single camera I have both a handheld rangefinder based camera that I can just point, focus and shoot, at least when I’m using the Xenar 135mm lens, as I’ve calibrated the rangefinder for the lens. I much prefer to shoot the camera like a field camera, on a tripod, composing and focusing using the ground glass on the back. Using the glass gives me full creative control and use of some fantastic lenses, like the Symmar-S 210mm (which is the lens I use the most). Plus that’s the power of large format, your Crown will be able to use most lenses out there, and all the film holders and the Graflok back means you can attach all sorts of accessories such as roll film magazines and Polaroid Type 100 film holders. And finally, this camera has a nice fast setup, pop the front cover, drop the bed pull out the bellows. And if you’re using ‘pancake’ style lenses, you can keep the lens on the camera when you close the door.

CCR Review 58 - Graflex Pacemaker Crown Graphic

CCR Review 58 - Graflex Pacemaker Crown Graphic

The Bad
Like any large format camera, the biggest detractor to them is the size and the amount of stuff you need to bring to use the camera well. Tripod, multiple film holders, meter, and the lenses all mounted on their boards. It adds up after a while. But for me, it’s worth the effort. Another issue that only large format shooters will note with a press camera is the lack of movements, while the Crown Graphic gives more than the Speed Graphic, you are still only limited to movements on your front standard, and even then you’re relatively limited. But again this was a camera not designed for shooting that requires much in the way of movements. And finally there is starting to be a lack of spare parts for these cameras, so getting bits and pieces replaced or repaired is starting to become a problem, either you can grab ones that are already broken for spare parts or pray that you know someone who can machine the appropriate piece. Thankfully their rugged build means they are designed to last.

CCR Review 58 - Graflex Pacemaker Crown Graphic

CCR Review 58 - Graflex Pacemaker Crown Graphic

The Lowdown
If you’re like me and shoot on a mobile basis, then the press camera is certainly the best option, and often a Crown Graphic kit can be had for an inexpensive out of pocket cost. Being highly adaptable to multiple shooting situations and with a quick setup and tear down it’s a great camera for learning on. Of course, if you’re a technical shooter who needs movements then I would avoid press cameras altogether and go for something a little more expensive. Intrepid, Shen-Hao, Takahara, Linhoff, and Sinar are all excellent options. But for me, I’m sticking to the Crown.

All Photos Taken in Georgetown, Ontario
Graflex Pacemaker Crown Graphic – Schneider-Kreuznach Xenar 1:4,7/135 – Kodak Tri-X Pan @ ASA-200
Pyrocat-HD (1+1+100) 10:00 @ 20C

Project:1812 – Rear Admiral Sir Philip Bowes Vere Broke, 1st Baronet, KCB

Project:1812 – Rear Admiral Sir Philip Bowes Vere Broke, 1st Baronet, KCB

The history of the Royal Navy is filled with legendary figures both real and imagined. Names like Nelson and Hornblower, Pellew and Aubrey. But there is one name that stands out in the annals of the War of 1812, and that is Philip Broke, or as he became known as Broke of the Shannon. While Broke was one of many captains that served in the blockade of the American coast, his actions turned the luck of the Royal Navy and boosted the flagging morale of the service. Born on 9 September 1776 at Broke Hall in Nacton, England. As the eldest of eleven children, he decided early on to join the Navy. But unlike his peers, who would learn on the job aboard ships, Broke enrolled in the Royal Naval Academy at Portsmouth. He would be commissioned as a midshipman in 1792 and was assigned to HM Sloop Bull Dog (18). During his service aboard the Bull Dog, he impressed the captain of the ship enough that when he (the captain) was reassigned to HM Schooner Eclair (12), Broke would come along to help form the officer corps aboard the new ship. Broke would be promoted to Lieutenant and serve aboard HM Frigate Southampton (32) as the ship’s third lieutenant. His first taste of battle would come at Cape Vincent in 1797 then along the coast of Ireland and in the North Sea. By 1800 he was senior enough to be promoted to Commander and given command of HM Sloop Shark (16) it would not last long, peace with France and a promotion to post-captain would have Broke ashore and on half-pay. The peace did not last long, and Broke soon found himself in command of HM Frigate Druid (32) by 1804. The ship was too large to run and too small to fight. Despite this Broke busied himself dealing with French Privateers.

Project:1812 - The Capture of the Chesapeake
The Bell of the Shannon on display in Halifax, Nova Scotia.
Hasselblad 500c – Carl Zeiss Planar 80mm 1:2.8 – Fomapan 200 @ ASA-200 – Kodak Xtol (1+1) 8:30 @ 20C

After two years commanding the Druid, Broke would assume command of the newly commissioned HM Frigate Shannon (52). The ship fresh from the stocks at Frindsburby was finally what the captain was looking for, a ship from which he could exersize his passion for naval gunnery. The Royal Navy at the time put more emphasis on seamanship than gunnery following the Battle of Trafalgar. Broke was among the minority who vauled both seamanship and gunnery his beliefs became clearly apparant and by the time the Shannon sailed for Halifax, Broke was drilling the crew on both the heavy guns and ship operations. The men of the Shannon were one of the more efficient fighting units in the Royal Navy, and Broke would go out of his way to keep them together. Broke would officially join the North American Squadron on 24 September 1811 and would begin to harras French and then American ships off the eastern seaboard of the United States. Broke’s efforts did not go to waste, but the captain did not want simple American privateers, he wanted one of the heavy frigates, the same ones that had on many occasions bested his fellow captains.

Project:1812 - The Capture of the Chesapeake
While Broke would go on to be buried in his home country, many of his crew remain still today in Halifax, Nova Scotia
Hasselblad 500c – Carl Zeiss Planar 80mm 1:2.8 – Ilford Pan F+ @ ASA-50 – FA-1027 (1+14) 5:00 @ 20C

When the Shannon sailed from Halifax on 21 March 1813, Broke was spoiling for a fight, and he determined that if the Americans did not come out on their own, he would have to provoke the matter. With the month of May coming to a close, the Shannon was running low on supplies, so Broke sent a challenge to Boston for single combat, ship-to-ship to Captain James Lawrence aboard US Frigate Chesapeake (50). A challenge that never reached Lawrence as the messenger arrived too late only to see the American Frigate sailing out of Boston Harbor with flags flying. The two captains did meet on 1 June 1813 where the months of training saw the Shannon outfight and outgun her American opponent. But the action would prove deadly for Broke who survived the engagement but suffered a major head wound.

As the Chesapeake appears now ready for sea, I request you will do me the favour to meet the Shannon with her, ship to ship, to try the fortune of our respective flags. The Shannon mounts twenty-four guns upon her broadside and one light boat-gun; 18 pounders upon her maindeck, and 32-pounder carronades upon her quarterdeck and forecastle; and is manned with a complement of 300 men and boys, beside thirty seamen, boys, and passengers, who were taken out of recaptured vessels lately. I entreat you, sir, not to imagine that I am urged by mere personal vanity to the wish of meeting the Chesapeake, or that I depend only upon your personal ambition for your acceding to this invitation. We have both noble motives. You will feel it as a compliment if I say that the result of our meeting may be the most grateful service I can render to my country; and I doubt not that you, equally confident of success, will feel convinced that it is only by repeated triumphs in even combats that your little navy can now hope to console your country for the loss of that trade it can no longer protect. Favour me with a speedy reply. We are short of provisions and water, and cannot stay long here.

Broke and the Shannon would return in triumph, Broke hailed as a hero, as his victory resonated across both North America and through England. He would earn the name Broke of the Shannon as the Common Court of London would award him with a plate and cup as prizes, as well as the Freedom of the City of London, as the Court at St. James would make him a Baronet. Broke would recover enough to command the Shannon on her return voyage home. Further awards would come to him including the Naval Gold Medal, one of only eight awarded for single ship actions. While his head wound would preclude him from commanding again in his career, he would continue to serve the Royal Navy as a gunnery expert and would receive an appointment to Knight Commander of the Order of the Bath in January 1815. He would receive his final promotion to Rear Admiral of the Red in 1830. He would finally attempt to relieve the pain from his wound in 1840, but his body could not take the strain and at the age of 64 he would pass away. He would be buried at St. Martin’s Church near his family home of Broke Hall. But even today the name of Broke is far from forgotten, historical fiction author, Patrick O’Brien would bring Broke to life in two of his novels, The Fortunes of War and The Surgeon’s Mate where Broke was depicted as a cousin of O’Brien’s creation, Captain Jack Aubrey.

Written with Files From:
Brighton, J. G., and Philip Bowes Vere Broke. Admiral Sir P.B.V. Broke a Memoir. London: S. Low, Son, and Marston, 1866. Print.
Pullen, H. F. The Shannon and the Chesapeake. Toronto: McClelland and Stewart, 1970. Print.
Lossing, Benson John. The Pictorial Field-book of the War of 1812 Volume 2. Gretna, LA: Pelican Pub., 2003. Print.
Web: www.biographi.ca/en/bio/broke_philip_bowes_vere_7E.html
Web: ageofsail.wordpress.com/2009/01/29/rear-admiral-sir-philip-bowes-vere-broke/

Classical Camera Revival – Bonus Episode – Mike Robinson, Daguerreotype Master

Classical Camera Revival – Bonus Episode – Mike Robinson, Daguerreotype Master

ccr-logo-leaf

Toronto resident Mike Robinson is a master of the Daguerreotype process, producing images of unparalleled beauty and technical excellence. In this bonus episode, John talks with Mike about the challenges and rewards of this venerable photographic process

A video of Mike at work

Mike has been kind enough to supply us with some images of his recent work. All images are copyright Mike Robinson, all rights reserved.

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CCR Review 14 – Contax G2

CCR Review 14 – Contax G2

Don’t let the top fool you, the Contax G2 isn’t actually made by the famous German camera manufacture that produced the same cameras that Robert Capa took with him during the Operation Overlord landings at Normandy, better known as D-Day. While proudly saying Contax, it’s actually manufactured under licence by the Japanese firm Kyocera. But the Contax G2 does hold one thing above any other rangefinders out there, it is one of two autofocus rangefinders ever produced, the other one is the previous G1 model. There are some out there that say that the G series aren’t true rangefinders, and they do have a point. But the general style of camera screams rangefinder, and it is one of my favourite systems to work with when size and space is an issue.

CCR - Review 14 - Contax G2
The G2 looks great when on a patio with a tasty European beer

The Dirt
Maker: Kyocera
Model: Contax G2
Type: 35mm Autofocus Rangefinder
Lens: Interchangeable, G-Mount
Year of Manufacture: 1996

CCR - Review 14 - Contax G2

CCR - Review 14 - Contax G2

The Good
If you love the rangefinder format but just can’t get the knack of the focusing system than the G2 is for you. While the autofocus isn’t perfect, it still is better than the older G1 models. Not to mention the size is perfect for tucking in a small shoulder back, or in a camera backpack is a great second camera if you’re shooting a large format system because it takes up very little space, even with a lens attached. It also feels great to hold and can be fairly quick in bright environments. And this camera is a solid piece of metal, very little plastic in the construction of it, so it can be bounced around a bit. For operation the camera has a good meter in it, with aperture priority or full manual mode. And finally the optics, against Japanese made under licence from Carl Zeiss, and when compared to the actual Zeiss made optics there is no difference in quality. The key is to the stick to the prime lenses, the zoom is a bit iffy. To go along with the optics, the viewfinder will automatically adjust its zoom range to match the lens you’ve mounted, from 28mm to 90mm. There is a winder lens that the viewfinder cannot accommodate so you’ll need the shoe mounted viewer to help with composing your photos.

CCR - Review 14 - Contax G2

CCR - Review 14 - Contax G2

The Bad
Oddly enough the one thing that makes the camera different is also the weak point on the camera, the focusing system. While better than the G1 the camera’s autofocus can be slow in lowlight and a bit unpridicatable. And when it comes to manual focus, don’t even bother, it becomes little better than a guess focus camera with a distance scale being displayed in the viewfinder, best to pack along and external rangefinder to help out if you’re doing manual. Another issue is that the command dials are very sensitive, make sure to check the EV, Focus Mode, and Drive Mode dials if you’ve pulled the camera out of the bag or had them bouncing against something because they have a tendency to move on you. The camera is also a bit of a battery hog taking 2 CR2 batteries (which aren’t cheap), so best to pack a spare set (or two).

CCR - Review 14 - Contax G2

CCR - Review 14 - Contax G2

The Low Down
Despite the drawbacks, the camera remains one of my favourites for travelling when space is an issue or for travelling light at photowalks. It remains today a very polarizing camera, those who love it love and those who hate it hate it. And despite that remains the one camera in my collection that photographer friends of mine always want to borrow. It’s a camera that is certainly worth a try, but try it first, see if you like it before you go out and buy the camera.

All Photos shot in the Historic Center of Antwerp, Belgium
Contax G2 – Carl Zeiss Planar 2/45 T* – Ilford FP4+ @ ASA-125 – Ilford Ilfosol 3 (1+14) 7:30 @ 20C

Project:1812 – Battle of Lake Huron

Project:1812 – Battle of Lake Huron

The final engagement in the Northern Theatre of the War of 1812 was actually two different naval actions, but as the two are closely connected, I have combined them into one entry and simply titled it after the second engagement, the Battle of Lake Huron. The results of this battle gave the British undisputed control over the North by the end of the war, and sole control of Lake Huron.

Project:1812 - Battle of Lake Huron
A model of H.M. Schooner Nancy as she would have appeared in 1814

Following Croghan’s failure to take back Mackinac Island in his frontal assault in August of 1814, Sinclair opted to blockade the small island fort and cut off the supply line which meant locating H.M. Schooner Nancy. Eventually a prisoner captured at St. Mary’s raid provided the location of the small naval establishment on the Nottawasaga River, and that the Nancy was heading toward there now. Sinclair left two ships behind to watch the island should the Nancy turnabout, and took the U.S. Brig Niagara, U.S. Schooner Tigress, and U.S. Schooner Scorpion to lay in wait for the Nancy. However Lieutenant Robert Worsley had already received orders from Mackinac Island to hide the ship and wait out the American squadron. Worsley hid the ship a few miles away from the mouth of the Nottawasaga River near a blockhouse. Moving three of his ship’s four guns the two 24-pound carronades and one 6-pounder. With reinforcements unavailable due to the Niagara Campaign to take back Fort Erie pulling most troops and the local militia refusing to fight, Worsley’s 22 sailors and 20 native warriors laid in wait should the Americans appear.

Project:1812 - Battle of Lake Huron
Nancy Island today is home to a museum which preserves the hulk of the ship, is located in Wasaga Beach, Ontario

Sinclair soon realized that either the Nancy had slipped past them or was already hiding in the area and began his search the various coves and inlets around the Nottawasaga River. But it was a foraging party from his squadron that discovered the Nancy’s hiding place on the 14th of August. Sinclair landed a force of 300 men and a single artillery piece to attack the British ship from the land while his own three ships began a naval bombardment. The blockhouse offered some protection as did the surrounding woods, but Worsley soon found the situation dire, and rather than let his ship be taken as a prize order her destruction along with the blockhouse. By 4pm the Nancy and the blockhouse were ablaze and the remaining sailors and natives fled into the woods to avoid capture. Satisfied at the results, Sinclair pulled back, leaving the Tigress and Scorpion behind if the British decided to make their escape by water. The American crews eventually opting to block the mouth of the river with trees then headed north to engage in economic warfare against fur traders.

Project:1812 - Battle of Lake Huron
A plaque marks the spot where the Nancy’s crew embarked on their long trip back to Mackinac Island in Penetanguishene, Ontario

Worsley, the remaining Nancy’s, and the natives eventually hired some canoes and made for Mackinac Island to pass on the news. On the 24th of August the small party managed to evade the Tigress and Scorpion before making it to Mackinac Island by the 31st. When McDouall learned of the destruction of the Nancy and having the chance to lift the American blockade with capturing two ships in the process, he jumped at the chance. Four boats and 60 men from the Royal Newfoundland Regiment were assigned to the task. One boat, mounting the remaining 6-pound gun from the Nancy was assigned to Worsley and his 17 remaining Nancy’s. The other three boats were manned by Royal Newfoundlanders, commanded by Lieutenants Bugler, Armstrong, and Radhurst. Bugler’s boat mounted the 3-pound railing gun also brought from the Nancy. Accompanying them were 19 canoes and 200 native warriors under Chief Assiginack from Manitoulin Island. By the 2nd of September the squadron had made camp on Drummond Island, Worsley and his midshipman, Livingston decided to scout ahead to see if they could locate the American ships. They discovered the location of the Tigress on the 3rd and quickly returned. The natives were ordered to hang back, and on the early hours the British boats came up alongside the port and starboard sides of the Tigress. By the time her crew discovered the enemy it was far too late, the musket volley and attempt to fire the cannon failed and the Americans were quickly overwhelmed after a quick fight, resulting in 6 deaths (3 American, 3 British including Lieutenant Bugler) and 12 wounded (5 Americans, 7 British). With the ship secure and the American sailors sent under guard of the natives back to Drummond Island, Worsley made to sail. On the 5th the Scorpion came into view, it was soon obvious that it had not heard the fight, leaving the American flags flying and disguising the soldiers and sailors in greatcoats the now captured Tigress sailed towards her sister ship. The crew of the Scorpion continued to scrub the deck, as Worsley waited until they were a few yards away before firing a musket volley and a single shot from the 24-pound gun on the deck. By the time the two ship’s made contact the Scorpion’s crew were in chaos and were quickly taken, suffering two killed and two wounded, no British injuries were sustained.

Project:1812 - Battle of Lake Huron
A second plaque in Thessalon, Ontario commemorates the capture of the Tigress and Scorpion

The American prisoners were brought to Mackinac Island and the Tigress and Scorpion were outfitted for service in the Royal Navy, renamed the H.M. Schooner Surprise and H.M. Schooner Confidence. They also formed the newly formed Lake Huron Squadron and soon found a home port following the war at the Naval Establishment on Lake Huron. The British maintained a garrison on Drummond Island from 1815 to 1817 before moving their operations to the naval establishment at Penetanguishene, and continuing to operate until 1856. The wreak of the Nancy eventually began to form an island around it, and soon the residents of the newly formed community of Wasaga Beach came to know it as Nancy Island. The wreak was uncovered in the 1920s and was put on display on the 14th of August 1928, 114 years after the ship was destroyed. The Naval Establishment is now a living history museum known as Discovery Harbor which features two replica sailing vessels similar to ones that served at the base after the War. Historic markers at Penetanguishene and Thessalon mark the capture of the Tigress and Scorpion.

Project:1812 - Battle of Lake Huron
A replica of the HMS Techumseh, a ship that served the Royal Navy following the War of 1812 is part of Discovery Harbor, and is typical of a ship that would’ve served on the Great Lakes during the War.

Written with Files from:
Guidebook to the Historic Sites of the War of 1812 Second Edition by Gilbert Collins – 2006 The Dundurn Group Publishers
Web: www.wasagabeachpark.com/?action=display&cat=7
Web: www.eighteentwelve.ca/?q=eng/Topic/118

Rolleiflex 2.8F – Carl Zeiss Planar 80mm 1:2.8 – Kodak Tri-X 400 (400TX)
Kodak Xtol (1+1) 9:00 @ 20C

52:320TXP – Week 07 – Crown Point

52:320TXP – Week 07 – Crown Point

52:320TXP - Week 07 - Crown Point

I was introduced to the small Indiana town of Crown Point last May by LeAnn and was instantly drawn to the 1873 Italianate/Second Empire historic Lake County courthouse at the center of the downtown. So I knew I had to include this beautiful building in this year’s project as well. Sadly with all the parking around the square it was hard to find a good angle, so this is the one I ended up settling on. Of course as soon as I started setting up the camera I soon found plenty of locals watching me closing, a young man with an Ontario plated car in a small town in Indiana, what else are you going to gawk at? At least the one older gentleman who actually spoke to me waited until after I had finished with the exposure. Also of interesting note, I have reintroduced D-76 into my developing chemistry shelf.

Modified Anniversary Speed Graphic – Schneider-Kreuznack Angulon 1:6,8/90 – Kodak Tri-X Pan (320TXP)
Pentax Spotmeter V
1/50″ – f/32 – ASA-320
Kodak D-76 (1+1) 9:00 @ 20C