People, Places, and Things they all intersect with our lives in various ways and at multiple times, all according to a plan. I’m one who believes that everything happens for a reason; you may not always realise it at that time or won’t until much later. Take, for example, Southside Community Church; my family attended the church briefly when it first opened, but I became attached even attending Sunday School there before going to Knox later that Sunday morning. In High School thanks to a coworker of my mom, I went to the youth group there also, met many friends, or older siblings of thoseRead More →

My high school doesn’t exist anymore. Sure the building still stands, it serves a different purpose now, but the school I attended is no longer there. Everything got shifted to a new building and a new name. To be honest, I don’t miss it, or high school at all. High School was just a means to an end, but that doesn’t mean I didn’t have any high points to my time there. First, I was able to seriously build up my computer skills, both in function and support. Second, my love of history, both in exploring and how I write about it was because ofRead More →

If you’re of a certain age, you might recognise the title as being part of the school song for EW Foster. Foster is the school that I have some of the fondest memories from, and that’s even including High School. As a school, Foster isn’t that special, being built in the 1980s; it is a brown one-floor brick building with no details at all. Typical 80s, but I mean Milton has only one historic school that still stands. But the real magic of Foster happened inside the walls for me, from planting a maple key in a styrofoam cup in Kindergarten that grew to higherRead More →

I can probably trace my curiosity to peer behind the board up windows to Waldie’s Blacksmith shop. For much of my life, the building sat empty and abandoned. Sitting next to St. Paul’s United Church. But I also didn’t know the rich history behind the building that had captured that curiosity. James A. Waldie came to Canada taking over a business in Acton first before establishing his shop in Milton in 1865. The shop’s operations peaked in the 1890s when it operated around the clock employing five blacksmiths, two woodworkers, a painter, and a trimmer. After the death of James Senior in 1900, his sonRead More →

When I was little there wasn’t anything like Junior Kindergarten, in fact, it didn’t exist. Instead, we called it Nursery School, and honestly, it’s the same thing. The Nursery school I attended along with many of the kids that would go on to become my first circle of friends took place here at St. Paul’s United Church in downtown Milton. As a cooperative, parents would assist the teachers as volunteers, and for a fee, the kids could attend. Now the memories I have of nursery school are a little muddled, mostly from details that my parents have told me about. That I much preferred theRead More →

I’m not a farmer, in any sense of the word. I’ve never driven a tractor, milked a cow, tended a field. Yet for much of my life, I lived in a rural community. But Milton does stick to its small-town roots and one of the biggest ways that show is the fall fair. The Fall Fair is a local icon, the animals, the arts, crafts, and baked goods. The midway, salespeople, but the biggest part of it for me is the Demolition Derby. This might come as a surprise but I love a good demolition derby. There’s just something about having car on car destruction.Read More →

I’m one of the lucky ones, I have only had to move houses once in my entire life. That move happened three years ago when I got married. Most of my life was spent here, on this street in the same house from the moment I was born to the moment I moved out. I liked this street, it was quiet, it was friendly, and there were lots of families with kids near my age. There were trails that connected to parks that one could ride bikes on or just walk along. I could walk to all the schools I attended. And importantly it wasRead More →

I’m not a farmer, not in any sense of the word. I’ve never driven a tractor, milked a cow, ploughed, harvested or anything. And yet, Milton despite the insane growth over the past decade and a half the town remains firmly rooted in its rural foundations. And while the sprawl has reached out and struck through many of the farms that once surrounded the town’s core. Where I live now used to be a farm field for most of the years I’ve been alive. Yet you don’t have to go far to see the farms still that surround Milton. Plus we have several big farmsRead More →

While Milton itself doesn’t have any real involvement in the significant events in Canadian history, our existence is thanks to the War of 1812. Following the war’s conclusion in 1815, the Colonial Office in England began to encourage increased colonial expansion into Upper Canada. After the widespread purchase of large tracts of land from the Mississauga’s of the Credit, a section designated at Lot 14, Concession 2 of the Trafalgar Township went to Jasper Martin. After emigrating to Upper Canada along with his wife Sarah and two sons, Joseph and Edward, Jasper would settle on his plot in 1821. Within a year Jasper had aRead More →

What is home? It’s a question that many people have asked and those well versed in philosophy and have come up with many answers. Is home where you live, or where you were born? Or maybe it’s where your parents live? If you’re looking for that answer here, you’re in the wrong place. This is a project about my home, a town called Milton. The sign that welcomed people to Milton has changed a lot since I first arrived here with my parents; my dad wanted to deface the sign by painting a giant one making the population 30,001. He didn’t, and that sign isRead More →