Well it was bound to happen. I finally jumped in. I got a Large Format camera, loaded, shot, and developed. And it worked. Back at the end of February I took a trip down to Rochester, NY with my friend Chrissie to visit our friend Andrew and Jenny and her Husband Aaron to check out the Rochester Subway and the Genesee Brew House. Of course there was a visit to Photo Source, this small camera shop in downtown Rochester run by Dick Raas. I have been hunting a 4×5 camera for a while and really wasn’t picky minus the fact it needed to be portable.Read More →

So after Friday’s winter storm, Saturday dawned bright and clear so I loaded up three cameras and went to Hamilton. For these shots I really slowed down my shooting, one maybe two shots each place I stopped with the Rolleiflex. I carefully looked at each area, pre-visualized what I’d want the final print to look like. Using a Pentax Spotmeter V, I metered for shadows I wanted the most details in, then underexposed by a stop (Putting the shadows in Zone IV), focused, and shot. Then made notes on the exposure. It was basically like shooting large format (I did see a guy with aRead More →

This is what it’s all been leading up to. A print, there’s something unique about holding a print in your hand, looking down at the patterns of light and shadow being brought out in blacks, whites, and grays, it’s magic. Well actually its science, the perfect blend of art and science. Creating the print is a rather neat process from start to end and when you sit down and think about the sheer amount of control you have over the whole process is fantastic. You get to pick the camera (and in some cases the lens), film stock. Then you can meter it the wayRead More →

The Siege of Fort Meigs was a mess, a minor action at a depot fort that did little but injury the personal morale of a British officer and drive a wedge in the strained alliance between Tecumseh and the British. It was the opening move in the long game of William Henry Harrison and his designs for the invasion of Upper Canada. A muddy mess that did little to further the British plans but was exactly what Harrison had hoped in the end. A small, tactical victory. One of seven blockhouses that served as defensive strong points and secure artillery batteries for the palasade wallRead More →

One of the best-kept secrets of Niagara-On-The-Lake is the fact that the town itself has risen from the literal ashes to the quiet tourist town that it is today. If you take a close look at many of the historic buildings most don’t date any further back than 1813, and there’s a reason for that, considering how old the community is. Founded originally in 1781 as Butlersburg, as many of the original settlers were members of the Loyalist Irregular unit known as Butler’s Rangers, would take on the name West Niagara. When Upper Canada was officially established, John Graves Simcoe renamed the town again toRead More →

Agh, I’ve been remiss on posting more from the Photostock Event back in June of this year and for that I apologize, but things went straight down the tubes after photostock and I’ve been running at a million kilometers per hour since, and still haven’t stopped. But anyways I’ll get some more photostock up here over this week. Anyways onto the actual content. The M119 is a unique roads, it’s clasified as a state highway but is far from it, a national historic senic route runs from just outside the village of Harbor Springs to Cross Village, at Photostock I took the oppurtunity to driveRead More →

Following a series of defeats that saw the surrender of three American Armies and the British in control of the entire Michigan Territory from Ohio to Mackinac Island, General Henry Dearborn needed a new plan, one that would not only boost the morale of his troops, but give Washington DC a swift victory that they had been expecting. It was again decided that a three-pronged assault would be enough to force the British retreat and surrender from Upper Canada. But it didn’t go exactly to plan. Dearborn believed the false report that 8,000 British Regulars garrisoned Kingston, home to the Royal Navy Squadron on LakeRead More →

What do chocolate and the war of 1812 have in common; just one thing, a name, Laura Secord. Many people today hear the name Laura Secord and think of the Canadian confectionary company, but there was a hero behind that name. But unlike other heroes from the war whose names were praised right after their great victories, Laura lived in relative obscurity for decades after the war had ended. Born Laura Ingersoll on the 13th of September 1775 in Great Barrington, Massachusetts, she was the eldest of four born to Thomas Ingersoll and Elizabeth Dewey. When she was eight her mother passed away, her fatherRead More →

The first of many posts about the amazing mid-summer meetup I attended in northern Michigan. The event is called Photostock and hosted/organized by world renowned photographer Bill Schwab, who despite his world renownedness is a really cool down to earth humble guy who just wants to get other photographers inspired. And inspire me it did, to get back into the chemicals and restart developing my own black and white film, and to print…printing will come later, but I did find a place nearby that has rentable darkrooms so I will be printing again soon! But anyways, first, more Photostock. The event is held in theRead More →

At the suggestion of a friend, and taking advantage of a beautiful Sunday afternoon I visited Limehouse Conservation area just a half-hour drive from my hometown. I never realized such a wonderful trail system exsisted so close! Ruins of old lime kilns, being able to climb up and through the Niagara Escarpment. Just made for an enjoyable afternoon. I should go back here again this summer, then fall, and of course winter. It’s so close, and the best part is that it’s free! Nikon FM2 – AI-S Nikkor 50mm 1:1.4 – Kodak Portra 160 Rolleiflex 2.8F – Carl Zeiss Planar 80mm 1:2.8 – Ilford DeltaRead More →