When you compare the age of Canada’s army to that of other nations, our military is relatively young. As a nation of just over 150 years old, we depended almost entirely on our defence from the home government, France first and then England. And while a bulk of the soldiers in what would become modern-day Canada were regular professional soldiers and sailors, several locally raised regiments came to the defence of the territory should the need arise. The Canadian militia and Provincial ‘feasible’ troops fought in the War of 1812 and again during the Upper Canada Rebellion and Patriot Wars with varying degrees of success.Read More →

Here, at the end of history, we know that the war that is The Great War would only last one more year until on the 11th day of the 11th month at the 11th hour the guns across Europe would fall silent. But one hundred years ago they did not know that. The men and women who served, in another 100 years will they names be read aloud by the public? Will their names still be remembered? Will our grandchildren know of the sacrifice of those who died 200 years before? Will there be the same fanfare of sober celebration? I don’t know about then,Read More →

One of notable Governors of the British colonies that made up British North America during the Anglo-American War of 1812 is a man who helped aid the economic growth despite the war and presided over one of the least known campaigns in the war. Baptized John Coape Sherbrooke on the 29th of April 1764, the only son of William Sherbrooke and Katherine Pyndar. Born and raised in Arnold, Nottinghamshire, England as part of the gentry John, following his formal schooling was commissioned as an Ensign in the 4th Regiment of Foot in 1780, and three years later gazetted Captain transferring to the 85th Regiment ofRead More →

A dreary Saturday can only be spent one of two ways…either locking yourself inside or going to your favourite museum. I chose the later. The Canadian Warplane Heritage Museum at the Hamilton International Airport in Mount Hope, Ontario has always been a favourite of mine from the first time going when they were housed in an old hanger. Sadly in 1993 the hanger was destroyed by fire loosing five of their aircraft…but many survived that still form the core of the museum’s collection today. The star of the show, an Avro Lancaster bomber, a personal favourite of mine. What makes the Lancaster all the moreRead More →

I was pretty disappointed when I pulled the negs out of the tank, but I went ahead and scanned them anyways, and found…wonder. I was really pushing the limit this week, the interior of the National Museum of the United States Air Force at the Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Dayton, Ohio (now that’s a mouthful)! Is not exactly the best for photography, dark, spot lights, and when you’re running a camera with a centre-weighted meter the results can be interesting, combine that with pushing the film two stops to ASA-1600, and putting it through HC-110 Dilution B, there’s grain, and the images are spotty,Read More →

When it rains, the last place you’ll want to be is Fort Meigs, trust me on this one. The fort isn’t the nicest fort that got involved in the war, there is not a long drawn out or particularly memorable history about the depot fortification. It really is more of an afterthought, a post designed to be a stopping point for troops and supplies, and while it saw only two sieges over the course of the war it did stand out in one way. It was the largest wooden palisade wall fort in all of North America, at least when it was first built. UnlikeRead More →

The Siege of Fort Meigs was a mess, a minor action at a depot fort that did little but injury the personal morale of a British officer and drive a wedge in the strained alliance between Tecumseh and the British. It was the opening move in the long game of William Henry Harrison and his designs for the invasion of Upper Canada. A muddy mess that did little to further the British plans but was exactly what Harrison had hoped in the end. A small, tactical victory. One of seven blockhouses that served as defensive strong points and secure artillery batteries for the palasade wallRead More →

While many forts from the Anglo-American War of 1812 survive today in either original form or having been rebuilt in the 20th-Century, there are just as many that have not survived or have survived in a limited fashion. One such location and the center of the early days of the conflict is Fort Amherstburg or better known as its second name, Fort Malden. Located along the Detroit River in the town of Amherstburg, Ontario was the seat of British power on the western frontier of Upper Canada. There are few remains of the American built Fort Malden, but today the former site is operated byRead More →

The American plan for the invasion of Upper Canada would be a simple one. A coordinated three-pronged attack that would strike at Fort Amherstburg in the West, Montreal in the East, and the Niagara Penisula in the center. But in the 19th-Century coordinating three attacks with such vast distances between them was impossible. The Americans also believed that the local population would welcome them as liberators, not invaders. The quick turnabout at Detroit proved this second part wrong. And while General Isaac Brock proved himself the Saviour of Upper Canada at Detroit he would soon face both his next challenge and his mortality. A PlaqueRead More →

Negotiations to bring a higher-education campus to the small town of Germantown began in 1885, initially to be a satellite campus of the Cincinnati Wesleyan College, however that did not end up being the case, and the town council found themselves in the office of Orvon Graff Brown, who at the time was the president of the Ohio Conservatory of Music and the School of Oratory. Brown agreed to build a branch of his own College in Germantown. But by 1886 Brown was set on establishing a whole new college in the town and by 1888 the Twin Valley College was established by charter, andRead More →