Originally designed for aerial surveillance in Eastern Europe, the Derev line of films is new to the North American market thanks to the Film Photography Project. I had the honour of beta testing the film for the FPP and found that Derev Pan 100 is an excellent film for outdoor shooting on bright sunny days. Sharp with a decent touch of grain and an amazing tonality you can clearly see why this film was selected for surveillance. And while on my initial test I only worked with HC-110, I looked forward to trying the film out in various developers! Film Specs Type: Panchromatic B&W FilmRead More →

Back at the end of 2017, the film photography groups across Social Media began to talk about a photographic media producer in St. Petersburg in Russia called Silberra. While Silberra is not a new company they launched their Crowd Funding Campaign to expand their film manufacturing, introduce new film stocks, and expand their markets outside Russia and Eastern Europe. And while they encountered a pile of setbacks, but after waiting for nearly a year, we finally started to see some of the film starting to hit the market. Silberra Pan100 is the one film that I liked right off the mark, having done a first-lookRead More →

All stories have to start somewhere and to understand everything that happened after the Anglo-American War of 1812 one must learn about how the seeds of the struggles that are to come were first sewn. Pre-Confederation History is a bit of a mess, but there is a single touchstone date where everything stems from, and that is 1791. By 1791, the American Revolution was nearly a decade over, and many who still lived in the former colonies swore loyalty to the British Crown. Many did not wish to remain under a republic, and many Americans did not want these Tories in their country. And inRead More →

Svema, or by its proper name, Свема is a film stock that is relatively unknown here in North America unless you are of course fans of the Film Photography Podcast. The name comes from the combination of two Russian words, Светочувствительные Материалы, translated means Photosensitive Materials. If I had limited experience with the 100-speed version of the film, I have even less with Foto 400. The only time I’ve shot this roll I ended up with reasonably grainy, low-contrast images. So I wasn’t expecting much out the roll of film, but I soon found out that like Foto 100, I had greatly misjudged the filmRead More →

Svema, or by its proper name, Свема, is a film stock that is relatively unknown here in North America. But if you’re a fan of the Film Photography Podcast you will have heard of Svema. It would be Svema Foto 200 that first burst onto the FPP scene, and quickly became a favourite film of Leslie Lazenby. The name comes from the combination of two Russian words, Светочувствительные Материалы, translated means Photosensitive Materials. A film stock I have limited experience with, having shot a couple of rolls beforehand. And while those first two rolls I was not too pleased with the results, I now haveRead More →

We have a little bit of Saturday Night Fever here at the Classic Camera Revival and we just cannot get enough of those disco-era cameras from the 1970s. Turn up the Beegee’s, and get on your best bell bottoms, ’cause gimmie, gimmie, gimmie a cam before midnight! Camera’s featured on Today’s Show Minolta XE-7 – Back in the 1970s, Leica and Minolta joined forces and produced several ‘cousin’ cameras, the first being the Minolta CLE/Leica CL. But the second camera to come out of the Alliance was the Minolta XE-7, cousins with the Leica R3. And while at forty-yards the two may look alike, whenRead More →

It’s taken me nearly three years, but I have now reviewed one hundred film cameras! Even though the review rules have slipped a couple times (namely review a sheet film camera and a pair of polaroids), so it’s only fair that I distil these one hundred cameras down into a few top five lists! Just note that there’s no particular order for these top five lists and certainly are my own personal opinions! Also of note, I’ve done my best to not double-dip, that means if a camera appears in one list, that means it won’t appear in any other list. Top Five 35mm SingleRead More →

This year’s fall vacation certainly wasn’t only the Disney Parks. If we’re going to Florida, might as well do it right and take a day to visit Universal Studios in Orlando as well. Both Heather and I are big Harry Potter fans, both the books and the movies. And the main purpose of our visit to Universal was to visit the two areas dedicated to Harry Potter. Like Disney, the folks at Universal have designed two immersive worlds that bring both the books, but mainly the movies to life in two interactive and immersive environment that will have you shooting a lot of images asRead More →

Wait, you’re probably thinking what is a Disney Travel Blog doing here since you mostly expect photography, film photography at that. Well don’t worry, there’s plenty of both some beautiful images from Walt Disney World and some handy tips from one photographer to another when travelling to Walt Disney World (or even Disneyland Park). And if you’re thinking all you can capture at Disney is family snapshots, think again. Disney is immersive, you honestly feel like you’re a world traveller especially in Epcot and Animal Kingdom. So don’t be afraid to bring your cameras, but I do suggest following a few tips that I’ll outlineRead More →

For a mid-speed film, Superpan 200 is fairly grainy, so grainy that it surprised me until I learned of the original basis of the film. Superpan 200 is a former surveillance film sharp, but relatively grainy with an extended red sensitivity. It looks terrific behind a red filter. The heavier grain lends itself well to rough urban decay situations for that added grunge effect without pulling it. While not a film I use that often, I can see a use for it for a street photography film or architecture. Film Specs Type: Panchromatic B&W Film Base: Polyester Film Speed: ASA-200, Latitude: 100-1600 Formats Available: 35mm,Read More →