Many people have asked me how I first got into the reenacting hobby; my answer is a strange one for some. I got into the hobby through photography. It was back in 2008 when the Fort York Guard requested that I come along to the annual Siege of Fort Erie event to grab some photos. I walked away with some great shots, and my presence soon migrated to the 7th Battalion, 60th Regiment of Foot, a brand new reenacting unit at that point. I watched as these dedicated individuals portrayed what the British military was like during the Anglo-American War of 1812 and learned aRead More →

One of the best parts of being a historical reenactor is that you often get a chance to visit and stay in some of Canada’s historic sites, and many find their home in some of the beautiful towns in the province. And while it can be hit and miss along the Niagara River, Fort George in the picturesque Niagara-On-The-Lake, Ontario is certainly one such site. Having an event there during the July edition of the Summer Film Party offered me a chance to shoot in the historic walls of Fort George, a site deep in military history. Both the fort and the town have aRead More →

Halifax, it’s hard not to be reminded of the military past of the capital of Nova Scotia, just look up from the downtown and you’ll see the massive hill that rises above the town. Or see the Royal Canadian Navy sailing in and out of the harbor. Or even see the old fortifications that dot the islands in the harbor or see the old gun batteries along the shoreline. The saying goes that a strong defense is a potent offense, except in Halifax’s case where a strong defense is just that, a defense. From the mid 18th-century through to the middle of the 20th-century HalifaxRead More →

Parliament Hill standing tall above the rush of the Ottawa River. While many a photographer would choose to shoot this building head on from the front, it took me a bit to find a proper vantage point from my favourite angle, the one that faces the Ottawa River mostly so that you can get a glimpse of the Library of Parliament, that round conical structure. My first choice was from across the River in the park surrounding the Museum of Canadian History (Museum of Civilization), but that wasn’t it, okay well how about in the heights on Nepean Point…so I lugged the gear across theRead More →

From 1645 to 1885 the red coat of the British Army was both feared and respected, this army of as General Sir Arthur Wellesley the Duke of Wellington put it, the scum of the Earth, drilled and disciplined into one of the most effective fighting forces the world had seen, and helped Britain build an empire that spanned the globe. Week 25 is for my friend Col. Anne whom I met through tumblr and our mutual interest in Military history. Specifically the late 18th to early 19th century. The gentleman portrayed here is dressed in the uniform of the 8th (King’s) Regiment of Foot asRead More →

Soldiers, Sailors and Airmen of the Allied Expeditionary Force! You are about to embark upon a great crusade, toward which we have striven these many months. The eyes of the world are upon you. – Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower D-Day: 6th of June, 1944 H-Hour: 06:30 Yes, you read that right, today marks the 70th anniversary of the D-Day landings, Operation Neptune. As I type this, I can feel the tears stinging my eyes. Operation Neptune, was the code name given to the Normandy landings on the coast of France in an effort to push back the Nazis and dislodge them from the Atlantic wall,Read More →

Well it’s been nearly a year before writing this Blog entry about a fantastic meet run by John Powers out of his backyard, I probably eluded to it in my 52 roll project last year. But with the meet coming up in a few months and my life starting to get busy again I decided to take a morning and set myself to printing some of my favourites from last year’s meet to show off this year. I don’t often scan my darkroom prints, my old V500 scanner really didn’t do them justice. But after posting a simple iPhone photo on the APUG thread aboutRead More →

I’m a fan of craft beer, and plays on old cop show titles. I found myself in Toronto, so I decided that despite the cold I would lug my 4×5 all the way to the Distillery Disctrict (which is nothing considering Mat dragged his 8×10 there a couple years ago now). Since it was around lunch I decided to check out the Mill Street Brewpub. Now I had stopped in before for a pint and apps, but never for a full meal. I was not disappointed in either the beer or the food. It’s some place I will for sure be going back to! ModifiedRead More →

As part of the preparation for putting the entire project into book form, I’ve been going around and re-shooting many of the fortifications that were involved in the War of 1812 using large format film (4 inch by 5 inch), simply for practice and the quality it gives. Here are the first group of forts. Completed at the start of the war to protect the dockyard at Prescott a critical point in the movement of supplies between Upper Canada, Lower Canada and Halifax, Fort Wellington was never outright attacked during the war, rather troops from the garrison would only participate in the battles of OgdensburgRead More →

When it rains, the last place you’ll want to be is Fort Meigs, trust me on this one. The fort isn’t the nicest fort that got involved in the war, there is not a long drawn out or particularly memorable history about the depot fortification. It really is more of an afterthought, a post designed to be a stopping point for troops and supplies, and while it saw only two sieges over the course of the war it did stand out in one way. It was the largest wooden palisade wall fort in all of North America, at least when it was first built. UnlikeRead More →