I’ll be the first to admit I have a soft spot for match needle mechanical SLRs. And the camera that created that soft spot is not the SR-T 101, but rather it’s cousin the SR-T 102, but it’s the 101 on the review block today, and with little between the two, it seems only fair to apply the same level of familiarity. The SR-T line is the cameras that made me love photography, simple in their design and operation the cameras are near perfect for students and those who are learning photography. And despite being decades separated from the camera, going back to them isRead More →

The lovely village of Queenston tucked away on the shores of the Niagara River, just below the Niagara Parkway and hidden in the shadow of the mighty heights. Although small, the village is no stranger to the stage of history. Almost 201 years ago it was the sight of an American invasion during the War of 1812, that saw the actions of General Isaac Brock and General Sheaffe drive away the invading force, and saw the death of Brock, in fact Brock and his Aide-Du-Campe are buried up on the Heights beneath the tallest military monuments in Canada. The Village was again occupied by AmericanRead More →

Established around 1781 as Butlerburg, named after Col. John Butler, the commander of the British Irregular unit known as Butler’s Rangers who fought during the American Revolution. The settlement was renamed West Niagara (as it was west of Fort Niagara), then Newark when the town became the capital of Upper Canada in 1792 by John Graves Simcoe. After the capital was moved to the new town of York in 1797 the town was named Niagara a year later. The town was invaded and occupied by American troops from May 1813 to December that year. When they left American forces along with a unit known asRead More →

I’ve honestly smelled better in abandoned buildings than this dark brown almost black solution sitting on the counter in my film lab (read: laundry room), but will it actually develop film, everything I’ve read and seen online says it will, my brain and nose say otherwise and I pour it into the tank. So as I agitate the tank, I am hoping that this strange brew (with apologies to Bob & Doug McKenzie) does its job. So before I continue, let me answer the question that some of you may be asking, what exactly is caffenol? Caffenol is a film developer that you can makeRead More →

The British Capture of Fort Niagara is one of many controversial engagements of the Anglo-American War of 1812 and certainly marked a shift in the tactics of both the British and Americans in the final year of the war. General Gordon Drummond’s orders came on the heels of the destruction of the town of Niagara, today Niagara-On-The-Lake, Ontario, by the Americans and a group of traitorous Canadians. While the exact details of the destruction were blown out of proportion to justify the brutality of the capture better, it none the less is a dark stain on the British record of the war. Fort Niagara asRead More →

One of the best-kept secrets of Niagara-On-The-Lake is the fact that the town itself has risen from the literal ashes to the quiet tourist town that it is today. If you take a close look at many of the historic buildings most don’t date any further back than 1813, and there’s a reason for that, considering how old the community is. Founded originally in 1781 as Butlersburg, as many of the original settlers were members of the Loyalist Irregular unit known as Butler’s Rangers, would take on the name West Niagara. When Upper Canada was officially established, John Graves Simcoe renamed the town again toRead More →

When the Americans retreated across the river in December of 1813 they left nothing but a charred ruin of the town of Newark (Today’s Niagara-On-The-Lake) and Fort George. Left with no fortifications in the area, General Drummond immediately ordered the capture of Fort Niagara (which was a huge success) and the construction of new fortifications to defend the Canadian Side of the mouth of the Niagara River. Drummond, quick to realize that Fort George was too distant to command the river mouth ordered the new fort be constructed closer to Lake Ontario. Construction of the new Fort Mississauga commenced in spring of 1814. It consistedRead More →

The Battle of Chippawa is unique among the engagements during the Anglo-American War of 1812 as it was the only one to feature a full proper European style engagement on both sides of the field. Line infantry tactics did not lend themselves well to the rough terrain of North America, so most engagements were a mixture of both skirmishing and line tactics dictated by the terrain. But Chippawa would go down as the only full-scale European-style battle of the entire war. The memorial to the Battle of Chippawa as in stands on the maintained section of the Battlefield. Canon EOS A2 – Canon EF 35-105mmRead More →

Queenston Heights, one of the famous locations connected to the Anglo-American War of 1812, the southern terminus of the Niagara Escarpment and surprisingly overlooked for its importance in all the stages of the war except for the famous battle that took place at the site in 1812. Queenston Heights takes it name from the village of Queenston located east of the heights. The village had its beginnings in 1780 founded by Robert Hamilton and marked one of the terminuses of the Niagara Portage that allowed traders to bypass Niagara Falls. A memorial carin in the village erroniously marks the spot of Brock’s death. In realtyRead More →

Early post since I’ll be away from the Interwebs for the next week starting Saturday so rather than deprive you readers of the weekly batch of photos how about an early post. Week 27 I took a drive, after spending Canada Day with my lovely and talented friend Sarah at the Niagara Parks School of Horticulture (featured back in week 24). I started the trip after a wonderful lunch in downtown Niagara Falls (Not the tourist trap of Cliffton Hill) at the Falls, I wanted to get a shot of falls but there were so many people and I wasn’t going to fight my wayRead More →