Tag: nikon

CCR Review 74 – Nikon FE

CCR Review 74 – Nikon FE

When it comes to classic cameras, there’s a specific look that will always be connected to Nikon. From the massive metered prisms of the F and F2 and the red strip that remain with the cameras to this day first introduced with the F3. But in the 1970s a certain touch of class entered the Nikon line, clean, simple, sharp. Pure photography as Nikon touts in their advertisements for the Nikon Df, which oddly enough is based around the camera under review, the Nikon FE. The design of the FE and it’s mechanical cousin, the FM, remained so popular the design lasted for several more models before production switched to Cosina where they took on a more modern Nikon look complete with the red stripe. The FE remains a solid shooter even today with a semi-automatic aperture priority electronic (hence the E in the name) camera with full manual function on top of it, and it fills in a small gap in my Nikon kit between the F2 and FA.

CCR Review 74 - Nikon FE

  • Make: Nikon
  • Model: FE
  • Type: Single Lens Reflex
  • Format: 135 (35mm), 36x24mm
  • Lens: Interchangeable, Nikon F Mount
  • Year of Manufacture: 1978-1983

CCR Review 74 - Nikon FE

CCR Review 74 - Nikon FE

The Good
The strongest feature on the FE is in its simplicity, having on a few dials to run the camera operations in a well laid out manner. A dedicated on/off switch with a pull out on the film advance lever. And that film advance, nice and short that allows for quick shooting. And don’t let the small size of the camera body, it has a decent weight and balance. I’d put the FE up against an OM-2 for size and functionality. While the viewfinder isn’t the brightest out there, that honour goes to the FE2, but the viewfinder is one of the best I’ve seen. A clear display of shutter speeds along the one side that makes the automatic mode easy as the shutter speed is indicated by a needle. And when you’re in manual mode, you simply match a needle to the indicated shutter speed. A modern version of my favourite match needle system. And the camera has a good meter in it to boot, centre-weighted and dead accurate.

CCR Review 74 - Nikon FE

CCR Review 74 - Nikon FE

The Bad
There is one lone issue I have with the Nikon FE. It’s not that it’s an electronic camera that requires a battery to operate fully, I knew that when I got the camera. Like many electronic cameras of the age, they came with a mechanical mode with a single shutter speed. That’s not the problem either; it’s the selected speed to make the mechanically fixed speed, 1/90th of a second. It just doesn’t make sense to me. The camera would be far more useful in mechanical backup if the speed were 1/125th makes it easy to run with Sunny-16! Thankfully the camera is not a battery hog, and the spares are pretty easy to acquire so having a couple in the bag wouldn’t be too much of an issue.

CCR Review 74 - Nikon FE

CCR Review 74 - Nikon FE

The Lowdown
Having shot the Nikon FM2n in the past I took to the FE immediately. It also reminds me of my third camera, the Minolta X-7a. For a first camera, this camera is great for anyone, style and class, second to none. With access to every Nikon lens out there from the early Auto-Nikkors to AI and AI-S (including AF-D), you have a solid camera that really won’t let you down. And while they carry a decent price-tag on the used market you can have one for between 80 to 200 dollars, and even in rough shape, the camera will still work. And while you can get a two-toned chrome/black, I’d go with an all black one; they look better in my opinion.

All Photos Taken in Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Nikon FE – AI-S Nikkor 50mm 1:1.4 – Bergger BRF 400 Plus @ ASA-400
Kodak HC-110 Dil. E 10:30 @ 20C

CCR Review 71 – Nikon Zoom 500AF

CCR Review 71 – Nikon Zoom 500AF

When it comes to reviewing a point-and-shoot camera, especially one from this era, you have to approach it differently. While many cameras of the era have earned a place in cult camera history, such as Olympus Stylus and Stylus Epic, high-end cameras like the Contax T2 and Nikon 35Ti. And then there are these cameras, the ones that more likely will languish in your family junk drawer or collect dust on the local thrift shop shelf. There’s a good chance that if you’re of a certain age, your parents used a camera similar to the Nikon Zoom 500 AF to capture family vacations and holidays. Released just before the digital storm, the Zoom 500 or Lite Touch 105 if you’re outside the North American Market, was a camera designed for just that. Simple, some zoom, designed to work best with consumer 200 and 400-speed colour films to be dropped off at your local one-hour photo lab. There’s a certain satisfaction to using the camera, simple to use, load, and shoot. Some features that would’ve made my life easier in those early days I was shooting with my family compact camera. Again, thanks to my Uncle Harvey for donating this camera, another one used by his father well after giving up on the Voigtlander!

CCR Review 71 - Nikon Zoom 500AF

  • Make: Nikon
  • Model: Zoom 500AF/LiteTouch Zoom 105
  • Type: Point-And-Shoot
  • Format: 35mm, 36x24mm
  • Lens: Fixed, Nikon Zoom Lens 38-105mm f/3.5-9.2
  • Year of Manufacture: 1995

CCR Review 71 - Nikon Zoom 500AF

CCR Review 71 - Nikon Zoom 500AF

The Good
The cameras of the era, especially those of this time aren’t exactly designed to give one a shooting experience that is exciting. The Zoom 500 is purpose built, to allow everyone to take snapshots without fuss or muss, and this case the camera works perfectly! Easy to shoot, easy to load, controls are well laid out especially the zoom and shutter release. And it’s hard to forget which is which. Another point on the handling of the camera is that there’s a slight lens barrel making it more difficult to stick your finger over the lens. The viewfinder gives you feedback on the zoom of the lens, which doesn’t have a bad range for a point-and-shoot. And the one thing that stands out to me with the viewfinder is the framing lines to help with composing your shots. The one thing I was afraid of when working with the camera is that I kept on turning off the flash as I was outdoors, it was a sunny day, and I was only shooting 100-speed film. To my surprise the results were sharp, some underexposure but not surprising but overall well-exposed images and the quality of the images at every zoom, point surprised me. While chatting after the fact with John Meadows, he noted that Nikon Point-And-Shoots had good optics for the cameras of its type.

CCR Review 71 - Nikon Zoom 500AF

CCR Review 71 - Nikon Zoom 500AF

The Bad
It’s straightforward to blast this camera for the lack of feedback and manual functionality I simply cannot because this isn’t a high-end camera, it’s not designed to be used in that way. So I cannot fault the camera for that. However, the one thing I did find annoying is that it kept asking me to turn on the flash, even though looking at the negatives the exposure seemed perfectly fine. Now while the optical quality of the lens is excellent, it isn’t the fasting glass on the block, nor would I expect it to be. Sure at the 38mm end, the maximum aperture is f/3.5 which is nothing to sneeze at, but when you have it at the full 105mm you’re looking at only f/9.2, I have faster lenses with my 4×5 setup. I also think the placement of the viewfinder could be a little more towards the centre of the camera body to aid in full composition with the aid of guidelines. The way it’s placed now you’re losing a good chunk of your lower right side of the frame. And finally, it suffers from the same problem that many cameras from the 1990s suffered, the CR123A battery. While easy to find in both camera stores, once you get out of major population centres you’ll struggle, at least they have a long life.

CCR Review 71 - Nikon Zoom 500AF

CCR Review 71 - Nikon Zoom 500AF

The Lowdown
You’re better off with a modern digital point-and-shoot camera than shooting with any 1990s point and shoot camera. But if you want something dead simple to get a child or a digital shooter who has no experience with an SLR, there’s something to be said about the Zoom 500. The viewfinder, while not placed ideally has the guides to help with composition, and the hands-off controls make it simple just to get the shot. It lets the shooter figure out composition first and worry about exposure later. In shooting with the Zoom 500, I realised that maybe my family should have looked at Nikon cameras more so than Minolta when we were replacing our old 1980s family camera.

All Photos Taken in Toronto, Ontario
Nikon Zoom 500AF – Nikon Zoom Lens 38-105mm f/3.5-9.2 – Kodak TMax 100 @ ASA-100
Kodak HC-110 Dil. B 6:00 @ 20C

One More Time – Efke Film

One More Time – Efke Film

If you’ve been doing the film photography thing for some time now, you’ll have heard about a classic film emulsion, that is Efke. Efke, a brand name of the film from the Croatian firm, Fotokemika, is a silver rich panchromatic film that gives any images a classic look. This classic look is because the film using a traditional grain structure has a high silver content, and only uses a single emulsion layer. Sadly, when Fotokemika closed their doors due to the age of their equipment and the cost of continuing to maintain the machines, it not only killed the Efke line of films but Adox as well. And while Adox bounced back and still supports a decent number of film stocks such as CHS 100 II and CMS 20 II, Efke has remained buried. And while you can’t buy new stock Efke, a gentleman in Croatia happened across a warehouse worth of Efke 100 film in 35mm and began selling it on eBay. I jumped on this and bought a brick. Of course, I’m not one to horde film or save it for a rainy day.

Product Highlights

  • Type: Panchromatic B&W Film
  • Base: Polyester
  • Film Speed: ASA-100
  • Formats Avaliable: 35mm/127/120/Sheet

This ain't no Baywatch
Nikon FA – AI-S Nikkor 50mm 1:1.4 (Yellow-15) – Efke KB 100 @ ASA-100
Pyrocat-HD (2+2+100) 8:00 @ 20C

When you could buy Efke films at your usual photographic supply stores, I tended to stay away from the 100-speed stock, going instead with the 50 and 25-speed films. In fact, I shot my final rolls of Efke 50 through 2015 to 2016; I even got a chance to shoot Efke 25 in 4×5 format having secured a short box from Burlington Camera’s Film Fridge. Now looking back through my Flickr search, Efke was a mainstay of my film fridge for a good seven years.

CCR Review 64 - Kodak Pony 135 Model C
Kodak Pony 135 Model C – Kodak Anaston Lens 44mm ƒ/3.5 – Efke KB 100 @ ASA-100
Kodak HC-110 Dil. B 5:30 @ 20C

When I had shot that final roll in March of 2016, I figured that was it! Fotokemika had shut down, Adox had begun to produce their film stock. Then, at the Winter 2017 Toronto Film Shooters Meetup, James Lee mentioned he had come across an eBay auction, the auction I referred to in my first paragraph. The game was afoot! Several folks around the table immediately upon returning home put in their orders. And sure enough, a couple of weeks later this well-wrapped package of film arrived from Croatia.

Let Fly!
Nikon F5 – AF-S Nikkor 70-200mm 1:2.8G VR – Efke KB100 @ ASA-100
Blazinal (1+50) 10:00 @ 20C

There is still enough information out there to develop the film, with most people going for Rodinal or HC-110 as their soup of choice. And yes Efke looks excellent in both those options, but I wanted to try something different. The one thing I was a little surprised that nowhere did I find a developing time for my favourite Kodak developer next to HC-110 that is D-23. There are D-76 times, so I had that at least as a base. A quick search online landed me back on the APUG site and found a thread with the exact question I was asking. After much consideration, I landed on seven minutes, forty-five seconds. It worked, and I was fairly pleased with the results.

Oh that Swirl
Nikon F5 – Lomography Achromat 64mm/2.9 (Orange-22) – Efke KB100 @ ASA-100
Kodak D-23 (Stock) 7:45 @ 20C

There is still more to go through; I gave Pyrocat-HD a try being my favourite developer period. PMK Pyro worked magic on Efke 25 and Efke 50, I wasn’t too much a fan of Ekfe 100 in Pyrocat-HD. If you are planning on giving Efke a try or happened across a brick of the stock, this isn’t a film for someone who is used to modern film. You will get more grain on this film that you would on Ilford FP4+.

Clean Lines
Nikon FA – AI-S Nikkor 35mm 1:2.8 (Yellow-12) – Efke KB 100 @ ASA-100
Blazinal (1+25) 6:00 @ 20C

If you do happen to enjoy this look, I know I do in certain situations like re-enactments or gritty street photography work; then you don’t have to fret too much. While Efke is gone, there’s still plenty of film stocks out there that can provide you with a similar look. There’s Adox CHS 100 II, I’ve shot this film only in 4×5 sheets and think it’s a beautiful film stock, and being 4×5 and while I haven’t picked up any 35mm stock I just may have to. But probably your best bet is to look at Fomapan 100, this film is a recent addition to my tool kit and provides a beautiful classic look especially souped in Rodinal and D-23.

Doors Open: Toronto

Doors Open: Toronto

When it comes to Doors Open events, there’s no bigger one in Ontario that Toronto’s. With 2017 being the 150th Anniversary of Canadian Confederation, Toronto made it a goal to have 150 buildings on their doors open event. And what a selection there was, with lots of old favourites and plenty of new ones especially to me. I’ve visited Doors Open Toronto on many occasions, but always seem to hit up the same locations over and over again. So this year I made a point to visit many of the places I’ve never visited, or haven’t been happy with my photographs in the past. I also made a point to visit a few additional sites on Sunday as well. This year I managed to visit a total of fourteen locations, a record for any doors open event I’ve visited in the past. I also made a point this time around, like Doors Open Hamilton, to stick to film with only one location being shot mostly on digital. So without further fanfare, Doors Open Toronto. Photography wise I used my trusty Nikon F5 and carried or more rather lugged a series of lenses along with me, a way to force myself to capture both the wide open spaces that the sites presented but also to focus in on the details. The film I chose is a new favourite of mine, Japan Camera Hunter Streetpan 400 to give me some speed in the spaces where I would have to shoot handheld. Sadly when I pulled the film out of the tank I noticed that most of my interior shots were so dark not even bold efforts in Photoshop could recover them. Of course, it wasn’t until later in a dream (and talking out loud apparently) that I realized my mistake. Streetpan likes sunlight, it thrives on it. Also having no information about the film’s reciprocity, and I was sunk. At least I was able to recover a few shots for each location.

St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church: Always a favourite of mine, St. Andrew’s is the oldest Presybertian congregation in the city and the regimental church of the 48th Highland Regiment of Canada. Constructed in 1876 under the watchful eye of William G. Storm this Romanesque Revival Church is one of the most ornate Presbyterian Churches I have visited; it even surpasses St. Paul’s Presbyterian in Hamilton, Ontario.

DO:T 2017 - St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church
Nikon F5 – AF-S Nikkor 14-24mm 1:2.8G – JCH Streetpan 400 @ ASA-400 – Blazinal (1+25) 10:30 @ 20C

Campbell House: Toronto is home to many museums, some better known than others. The Campbell House is one of the lesser known museums. Built in 1822 in the Georgian style, it was home to William Campbell, the Sixth Justice of Upper Canada. It stands as one of the few surviving examples of buildings from the town of York, saved in 1972 by the Advocates Society from demolition. And as exciting as it was to be finally able to go into this small house that I had passed unnumbered times now, it was this single shot from the outside with the storm clouds and the Canada Life building in the background that struck me.

DO:T 2017 - The Campbell House
Nikon F5 – AF-S Nikkor 14-24mm 1:2.8G – JCH Streetpan 400 @ ASA-400 – Blazinal (1+25) 10:30 @ 20C

Church of the Holy Trinity: In Toronto there are many buildings that have simply defined the steady march of the city growth, places like Fort York and Campbell House, Montgomery’s Tavern, and Holy Trinity. You might have never even seen this little church because it sits hidden, a small pocket tucked out behind the Eaton Centre. And yet throughout its history, the church has had a big impact on the city. From leading the charge with social justice causes and the arts, has been a lead in fostering social diversity in Toronto in many ways including organizing concerts and community events for gay dances held by the Canadian Homophile Association of Toronto in the 1970’s and providing a location for early church congregations of Armenian and Japanese Canadians. This is the little church that can.

DO:T 2017 - Church of the Holy Trinity
Nikon F5 – AF-S Nikkor 14-24mm 1:2.8G – Kodak Portra 400 @ ASA-800 – Processing By: Burlington Camera

MaRS: While not my usual spot for a Doors Open Event, but having a wife who is in the medical field, a visit to MaRS was certainly in order. Built as the College Wing of Toronto General Hospital in 1913 is certainly a spot that shows the power of adaptive reuse. The Beaux Arts building designed by Frank Darling looks as it did when it was built, but you cross the threshold and it’s a contemporary wonderland. And while like many locations I lost all my interior shots, I did make a point to capture the beauty of the exterior including the central tower.

DO:T 2017 - MaRS
Nikon F5 – AF-S Nikkor 70-200mm 1:2.8G VR – JCH Streetpan 400 @ ASA-400 – Blazinal (1+25) 10:30 @ 20C

Church of the Redeemer: When a congregation decides to stay the course and rather than abandon their historic home makes a choice to restore and repair, they are to be applauded. Redeemer is one of those churches that has seen the growth of the city, while not a soaring cathedral, the church now sits in the shadow of skyscrapers. Constructed in 1871 in the Gothic Style, retains its historic beauty and charm. But my favourite feature in the whole church is the World War One Memorial windows showing wounded soldiers being watched over by an image of Jesus Christ.

DO:T 2017 - Church of the Redeemer
Nikon F5 – AF-S Nikkor 70-200mm 1:2.8G VR – JCH Streetpan 400 @ ASA-400 – Blazinal (1+25) 10:30 @ 20C

Bloor Street United Church: Like some United Churches, Bloor Street opened its doors as a Presbyterian church back in 1890. The 1920s saw the original entrance to the church demolished with the widening of Bloor Street and the congregation voting to join with the Wesleyans and Methodists to form the United Church in Canada. It was the 1950s that the history of the building gets interesting, a fire destroyed much of the building but rather than build a mid-century modern building, the building was restored to its original Victorian style designed by William R. Gregg. The highlight is, of course, the Great South Window that highlights the mission of the United Church, the unity of everyone. Look closely, you’ll see a sporty red car.

DO:T 2017 - Bloor Street United
Nikon F5 – AF-S Nikkor 70-200mm 1:2.8G VR – JCH Streetpan 400 @ ASA-400 – Blazinal (1+25) 10:30 @ 20C

The Daniels Building: I was excited to see that this building was on the list for doors open. This is the historic home of Knox College, established in 1875 at 1 Spadina Cresent in the Gothic Revival Style. It has been a building I had always be curious as to what secrets were behind the walls. And what a story this building has, it’s been a number of departmental homes for UofT, an Eye Bank, Hospital, Laboratory, Barracks, and currently, the new home of the John H. Daniels Faculty of Landscape, Architecture, & Design. The original Gothic Revival Building restored and a new addition added to the back. It was also one of the more popular spots.

DO:T 2017 - The Daniels Building
Nikon F5 – AF Nikkor 35mm 1:2D – JCH Streetpan 400 @ ASA-400 – Blazinal (1+25) 10:30 @ 20C

The Waterworks Building: This was a throwback for me, the giant empty waterworks building is the result of a make-work program in the city of Toronto during the Great Depression. Leaving the city with an Art Deco work building. Yet the site holds a bit of city history, being the original site of the St. Andrew’s Market, built in 1837, providing folks in the western expansion of the city a market like that of St. Lawerence. Inside it was like many of the industrial abandoned buildings I had visited in the past, at least this time around I wasn’t looking over my shoulder for cops or security.

DO:T 2017 - Waterworks Building
Nikon F5 – AF-S Nikkor 14-24mm 1:2.8G – JCH Streetpan 400 @ ASA-400 – Blazinal (1+25) 10:30 @ 20C

Fort York: I can technically visit Fort York anytime I want, it is, through reenacting, my home fort. But it made for a good place to end the day. Sadly I missed all the artillery demonstrations that saw the fort show off Canadian and British firepower for the past two centuries from the Anglo-American War of 1812, through the Boer War, the two World Wars and even into modern day conflicts that Canada has been involved in. At least it wasn’t too crowded and Heather and I did grab dinner at our favourite spot in the area, The Banknote.

DO:T 2017 - Fort York
Nikon F5 – AF-S Nikkor 70-200mm 1:2.8G VR – JCH Streetpan 400 @ ASA-400 – Blazinal (1+25) 10:30 @ 20C

Humber Lakeshore Campus: Built as the Mimico Asylum in 1888, the hospital was the first in Ontario to use the Cottage Plan first pioneered by Medfield State Hospital as a way to control overcrowding at Toronto and Hamilton. The doors opened in 1890 the hospital would grow to 10 buildings. The hospital would go on to trial several different treatment methods. Like many hospitals across North America by the 1970s the treatment of mental health issues moved to a more in-patient method and the smaller hospitals were closed, Mimico would close in 1979. The campus would be broken up, with the old hospital buildings being leased by Humber College in 1991. The cottages and administration building would become office and classroom spaces; even the tunnels saw restoration and use. The old carriage house/fire hall would be the only service building to survive and now is a Tim Hortons. While I originally wanted to include a photo of the tunnels as I was able to secure a tour, I decided to use a photo taken of one of the old female cottages against a bright blue sky. Much stronger images than the snaps in the tunnel.

DO:T 2017 - Humber Lakeshore/Lakeshore Psychiatric Hospital
Sony a6000 – Sony E PZ 16-50mm 1:3.5-5.6 OSS

Montgomery’s Inn: Despite being a fairly old city, it takes a lot of effort to find the hidden historical sites within the modern structures. And yet they’re still there. Now I have never had the pleasure of visiting Montgomery’s Inn, despite having heard about it through a fellow reenactor. While rather hidden, it’s in a rather modern looking area. I think that’s what I like about it the most is that it’s again that little pocket of history among the modern city of Toronto.

DO:T 2017 - Montgomery's Inn
Nikon F5 – AF Nikkor 35mm 1:2D – JCH Streetpan 400 @ ASA-400 – Blazinal (1+25) 10:30 @ 20C

Applewood, The Shaver Homestead: Inside you’ll find all sorts of people who will tell you more history about the place than you need to know, the gentleman greeted me at the entrance. And for such a tiny museum it has a huge history that stretches out across the country. This 1851 Victorian farmhouse would become the birthplace of James Shaver Woodsworth, he would go on to form the democratic socialist movement in Canada and the political party he founded would form the foundation of the New Democrat Party of Canada. When the vote on Canada’s entry into World War Two reached Ottawa, it was Woodsworth alone who would oppose it, he would die in 1942. That’s a lot of history for such a tiny home.

DO:T 2017 - Applewood, The Shaver Homestead
Nikon F5 – AF Nikkor 35mm 1:2D – JCH Streetpan 400 @ ASA-400 – Blazinal (1+25) 10:30 @ 20C

I think next year if I do Doors Open Toronto I’m going to focus on the eastern side of the city, use my car to move around at first before hitting the streets on foot. But we shall see. If you want to see more, check out the whole collection over on Flickr.

Classic Camera Revival – Episode 27 – Return of the Samurai

Classic Camera Revival – Episode 27 – Return of the Samurai

ccr-logo-leaf

The Nikkormat line was a series of SLRs released by Nikon through the 1960s to 70s that were aimed at the consumer market. While there were some electronic Nikkormat cameras the ones we have on the table today are the mechanical ones of the FT line. These are great cameras that you can have for a cheap price and still using all your Non-AI, AI, and AI-S lenses. AI and AI-S providing they still have the claw, unless you have the FT3.

Cameras Featured on Today’s Episode

Nikon Nikkormat FTn – An improved version of the original Nikkormat FT and the oldest one we have on the table. The meter coupling pin on the camera still had to be aligned with the meter coupling shoe on the lens, but the lens maximum aperture no longer had to be manually preset on the FTn. It also improved the lens mounting technique that you could rock the aperture back and forth so that the claw would catch on the pin.

Classic Camera Revival - Episode 27 - Return of the Samurai

  • Make: Nikon
  • Model: Nikkormat FTn
  • Type: Single Lens Reflex
  • Format: 35mm, 36x24mm
  • Lens: Interchangable, Nikon F
  • Year of Manufacture: 1967-1975

Dead Mill
Nikon Nikkormat FTn – Nikkor-H 50mm 1:2 – ORWO UN54+ @ ASA-100 – Kodak Xtol (1+1) 8:00 @ 20C

Scan-130425-0002
Nikon Nikkormat FTn – Nikkor-H 28mm 1:3.5 – ORWO UN54+ @ ASA-100 – Kodak Xtol (1+1) 8:00 @ 20C

Now Entering Leslieville.
Nikon Nikkormat FTn – Nikkor-O 35mm 1:2 – Kodak Tri-X 400 @ ASA-400 – Kodak HC-110 Dil. B 5:00 @ 20C

Nikon Nikkormat FT2 – Released as an answer to customer suggestions for improvement of the FTn. The FT2 would have a silver-oxide battery and a fixed hot shoe to mount and external flash. The FT2 also has a +/- in the match needle metering readout.

Classic Camera Revival - Episode 27 - Return of the Samurai

  • Make: Nikon
  • Model: Nikkormat FT2
  • Type: Single Lens Reflex
  • Format: 35mm, 36x24mm
  • Lens: Interchangable, Nikon F
  • Year of Manufacture: 1975-1977

Cherry Blossoms
Nikkormat FT2 – Tamrom 17mm ƒ/3,5 – Fujichrome Velvia 50

Caffenol-C 2 Bath Test
Nikkormat FT2 – Nikon Nikkor 50mm 1:1.8 – Polypan F @ ASA-50 – Caffenol-C 2 Bath 5+5

Firewood (Nikon Version)
Nikkormat FT2 – Nikon Nikkor 50mm 1:1.8 – Polypan F @ ASA-50 – Ilford ID-11 (1+1) 9:00 @ 20C

Nikon Nikkormat FT3 – Released as more of a stop-gap measure, the FT3 is a rare model of Nikkormat that can mount AI-S without needing the claw/pin interface. They were short lived as Nikon released the FM/FE line in 1977 a few months after the FT3 hit shelves.

CCR Review 46 - Nikon Nikkormat FT3

  • Make: Nikon
  • Model: Nikkormat FT3
  • Type: Single Lens Reflex
  • Format: 35mm, 36x24mm
  • Lens: Interchangable, Nikon F
  • Year of Manufacture: 1977

CCR Review 46 - Nikon Nikkormat FT3
Nikon Nikkormat FT3 – AI-S Nikkor 50mm 1:1.4 – Ilford FP4+ @ ASA-100 – Kodak D-23 (Stock) 6:00 @ 20C

CCR Review 46 - Nikon Nikkormat FT3
Nikon Nikkormat FT3 – AI-S Nikkor 50mm 1:1.4 – Ilford FP4+ @ ASA-100 – Kodak D-23 (Stock) 6:00 @ 20C

CCR Review 46 - Nikon Nikkormat FT3
Nikon Nikkormat FT3 – AI-S Nikkor 50mm 1:1.4 – Ilford FP4+ @ ASA-100 – Kodak D-23 (Stock) 6:00 @ 20C

Looking for a good spot to get your gear and material fix…check out Burlington Camera, Downtown Camera, Film Plus, Belle Arte Camera and Camtech, if you’re in the GTA region of Ontario. In Guelph there’s Pond’s FotoSource For those further north you can visit Foto Art Camera in Owen Sound. On the West Coast (British Columbia) check out Beau Photo Supply. Additionally you can order online at Argentix (Quebec), the Film Photography Project or Freestyle Photographic.

Also you can connect with us through email: classiccamerarevivial[at]gmail[dot]com or by Facebook, we’re at Classic Camera Revival or even Twitter @ccamerarevival

An Extra Special Gift

An Extra Special Gift

This was certainly a first for me. I’ve been doing the photography thing for many years, and while my favourite subjects are things that really can’t move around, I do find myself enjoying the few portrait and wedding gigs that I come across. But when it came to shooting maternity it was all new territory. And it can be a pretty creepy one also. You look at places like Pinterest, and you can get carried away by semi-nude women showing off their pregnant bodies. Now before you lay on the hate, I’m not saying that’s a bad thing or wrong. I just don’t like that style of shooting, and when my subjects are my soon-to-be brother & sister-in-law. That’s just not the direction I want to take.

Evan & Holly - Maternity Shoot
Sony a6000 + Konica Hexanon 1:2.8 f=35mm

Evan & Holly - Maternity Shoot
Sony a6000 + Konica Hexanon 1:2.8 f=35mm

The idea is Heather’s who came up with the idea to do a shoot with them once we found out they were expecting, and it became all the more special when the one baby was two. Yep, instant niece and nephew added in, and just before my wedding. It did take Holly a bit of time to warm up to the idea of having maternity photos done. And I can understand that she also does photography, and it’s difficult for a photographer to stand in front of the camera rather than behind.

Evan & Holly - Maternity Shoot
Sony a6000 + KMZ Helios 44-2 2/58

Evan & Holly - Maternity Shoot
Nikon F5 – AF Nikkor 50mm 1:1.4D – Kodak Tri-X 400 @ ASA-250 – SPUR HRX (1+17) 11:00 @ 20C

Thankfully we had just the right weather to be outside, well it was a little cold for Evan and Holly, I at least could keep my coat on. And for the backdrop, we took advantage of being in Hamilton the city of waterfalls and worked at Tiffany and Sherman Falls. What makes this whole thing extra special is that Evan and Holly had been waiting a long time to start a family, so it was an amazing idea from Heather to document it right from the beginning.

Evan & Holly - Maternity Shoot
Nikon F5 – AF Nikkor 50mm 1:1.4D – Kodak Tri-X 400 @ ASA-250 – SPUR HRX (1+17) 11:00 @ 20C

Evan & Holly - Maternity Shoot
Nikon F5 – AF Nikkor 50mm 1:1.4D – Kodak Tri-X 400 @ ASA-250 – SPUR HRX (1+17) 11:00 @ 20C

The great part was that once I got rolling with the photos it went really well, both Evan and Holly were great subjects, and the process moved along well. I found myself looking only once at a few saved images on Pinterest and then settled into my usual groove when shooting portraits. The only thing different was making sure to show off the baby bump! And no, I’m not getting into newborn photography, but I think I’d be okay doing another maternity shoot of the same style.

Classic Camera Revival – Episode 21 – The Great Nikon Show

Classic Camera Revival – Episode 21 – The Great Nikon Show

ccr-logo-leaf

It’s the great Nikon show, specifically talking about the Nikon F line of cameras and to narrow it down even more, the highly prized single digit F line, or Nikon’s professional line of cameras! Since we’re all about pre-2000 we’re leaving out the F6 (which isn’t really marketed as a professional camera) and focusing on the F, F2, F3, F4, and F5 cameras! On air for this episode is John Meadows, Alex Luyckx, and guest co-host Bill Smith!

All in the (F)amily
All in the F(amily)!

Cameras Featured on Today’s Show…

Nikon F – The one that started it all! The Nikon F was the camera that introduced the world to the professional SLR system camera, where the user could customize the camera to any configuration that they need to get the shot. It also cut its professional teeth in the damp jungles of Vietnam.

The Dirt:

  • Make: Nikon
  • Model: F
  • Type: Single Lens Reflex
  • Format: 35mm, 35x24mm
  • Lens: Interchangable, F-Mount
  • Year of Manufacture: 1959-1974

CCR - Review 28 - Nikon F Photomic FTn

Vintage Jag
Nikon F – Nikkor-S Auto 1:1.4 f=50mm – Ilford Delta 100

Columns
Nikon F – AI-S Nikkor 105mm 1:2.5 – Kodak Tri-X 400 – Kodak Xtol (1+1)

CCR - Review 28 - Nikon F Photomic FTn
Nikon F – AI-S Nikkor 105mm 1:2.5 – Ilford FP4+ @ ASA-125 – Kodak DK-50 (1+1) 5:00 @ 20C

Nikon F2 – The beauty that really carried on the tradition of the Nikon F but did so with style. It will also take you through the end of days and get fantastic photos as a result. Even today this is still a great camera to get your hands on, especially the later model units that would even have working meters still.

The Dirt:

  • Make: Nikon
  • Model: F2
  • Type: Single Lens Reflex
  • Format: 35mm, 35x24mm
  • Lens: Interchangable, F-Mount
  • Year of Manufacture: 1971-1980

Classic Camera Revival - Episode 15 - Mechanical Madness

Scan-141003-0014
Nikon F2a – AI-S Nikkor 200mm 1:4 – Kodak Ektar 100

Smile :D
Nikon F2 Photomic – AI-S Nikkor 50mm 1:1.4 – Holga 400 @ ASA-400 – Kodak Xtol (1+1) 9:30 @ 20C

Urban Desolation
Nikon F2 – Nikkor-N Auto 1:2.8 f=28mm – Rollei Retro 80s – Kodak D-23 (1+1) 13:00

Nikon F3 – The F3 was a radical departure for Nikon moving to an electronic semi-automatic (aperture priority) camera. While many photographers resisted this move, as the camera would not operate at all shutter speeds if it didn’t have battery power, it soon because one of the longest produced Nikon camera reaching all the way to the year 2000, outlasting both it’s successors in the F4 and F5.

The Dirt:

  • Make: Nikon
  • Model: F3
  • Type: Single Lens Reflex
  • Format: 35mm, 35x24mm
  • Lens: Interchangable, F-Mount
  • Year of Manufacture: 1980-2000

CCR - Review 24 - Nikon F3

Base of the Bloor Street Viaduct
Nikon F3 – AI-S Nikkor 28mm 1:2.8 – Adox CMS 20 II @ ASA-20 – Diafine 3+3

CCR - Review 24 - Nikon F3
Nikon F3 – AI-S Nikkor 50mm 1:1.4 – Ilford FP4+ @ ASA-125 – Ilford Microphen (1+1) 10:00 @ 20C

Lindsay 1
Nikon F3 – AI-S Nikkor 105mm 1:2.5 – Ilford Delta 400 – Kodak TMax Developer (1+9)

Nikon F4 – When it comes to camera meters, you really cannot beat the F4. This beast of a camera was the first Nikon professional camera to sport an autofocus system and a matrix metering system. The metering system was based on the earlier Nikon FA and even today Nikon digital cameras meters are based on the F4’s.

The Dirt:

  • Make: Nikon
  • Model: F4
  • Type: Single Lens Reflex
  • Format: 35mm, 35x24mm
  • Lens: Interchangable, F-Mount
  • Year of Manufacture: 1988-1997

CCR - Review 1 - Nikon F4

Svema Micrat-Orto - Test Roll 2 - Fifty Point Conservation Area
Nikon F4 – PC Nikkor 35mm 1:2.8 – Svema Micrat-Orto (FPP Super Postive Slide Film) @ ASA-0.75 – Kodak Xtol (1+1) 14:00 @ 20C

Man by the Beach: Colour version
Nikon F4 – Nikon Series E 75-150mm 1:3.5- Svema Colour 125

Plattsburg, New York - Eastman 5363
Nikon F4 – AF Nikkor 35mm 1:2D – Eastman 5363 @ ASA-25 – PMK Pyro (1+2+100) 11:00 @ 20C

Nikon F5 – The penultimate Nikon Professional SLR. The F5 was the final 35mm professional SLR and became the base for the D1, the first professional Digital SLR released by Nikon. It’s Alex’s personal favourite when it comes to Autofocus SLRs and is his choice with the AF DC-Nikkor 105mm 1:2D for street photography.

The Dirt:

  • Make: Nikon
  • Model: F5
  • Type: Single Lens Reflex
  • Format: 35mm, 35x24mm
  • Lens: Interchangable, F-Mount
  • Year of Manufacture: 1996-2004

CCR - Review 22 - Nikon F5

Gettysburg - Spring 2016
Nikon F5 – AF Nikkor 50mm 1:1.4D – Kodak Vision3 250D @ ASA-250 – Unicolor Rapid C-41 Kit

TFSM Winter '16 - Muddy York
Nikon F5 – AF DC-Nikkor 105mm 1:2D – Kodak Tri-X 400 @ ASA-200 – Pyrocat-HD (1+1+100) 10:00 @ 20C

Astrolab
Nikon F5 – AF DC-Nikkor 105mm 1:2D – Ilford Delta 100 @ ASA-100 – FA-1027 (1+14) 9:00 @ 20C

If you’re wondering why we didn’t include the F6, well it’s because none of us own one so we really can’t speak to it also it was not really aimed at the professional market as by the time the F6 was released the pros had gone digital and the F6 was aimed at the advanced amateurs with deep pockets.

Looking for a good spot to get your gear and material fix…check out Burlington Camera, Downtown Camera, Film Plus, Belle Arte Camera and Camtech, if you’re in the GTA region of Ontario. For those further north you can visit Foto Art Camera in Owen Sound. On the West Coast (British Columbia) check out Beau Photo Supply. Additionally you can order online at Argentix (Quebec), the Film Photography Project or Freestyle Photographic.

Also you can connect with us through email: classiccamerarevivial[at]gmail[dot]com or by Facebook, we’re at Classic Camera Revival or even Twitter @ccamerarevival

CCR Review 46 – Nikon Nikkormat FT3

CCR Review 46 – Nikon Nikkormat FT3

To be perfectly honest, I’m a sucker for mechanical match needle SLRs. They’re simple, elegant and great to learn on and even now still a joy to shoot. The FT3 is just that, an easy to use, fun camera that can if needed double as a self-defense weapon. The sad part is that the FT3 only was made for a few months before being superseded by the Nikon FM. A unique creature among the more consumer oriented Nikkormat lines the FT3 can use AI and AI-S lenses even if they don’t have the coupling claw. Sadly you won’t be able to use the Non-AI glass that many Nikkormat shooters love.

CCR Review 46 - Nikon Nikkormat FT3

The Dirt
Make: Nikon
Model: Nikkormat FT3
Type: Single Lens Reflex
Format: 35mm, 24×35
Lens: Interchangeable, Nikon F Mount (AI)
Year of Manufacture: 1977-1979

CCR Review 46 - Nikon Nikkormat FT3

CCR Review 46 - Nikon Nikkormat FT3

The Good
The FT3 is a strong camera, hands down. The best part about it is that it can take AI/AI-S lenses, unlike previous Nikkormat models. Which means you have a solid lineup of glass available to you as well as inexpensive Nikon Series E which you shouldn’t dismiss out of hand. And while this is a slightly more modern camera it feels like one made in the 1950s or 1960s, but it still feels great in the hand. And as an added touch, I like the round film counter window adds a nice retro look to it. Combine the look, feel, and weight with a short throw on the film advance you have a comfortable camera to use. The FT3 is also built like a brick so you can easily take it into almost any situation and it will come out on top. And finally, there’s battery power, while not needed (thankfully) it takes a normal silver oxide cell, so you don’t have to worry about keeping the meter running.

CCR Review 46 - Nikon Nikkormat FT3

CCR Review 46 - Nikon Nikkormat FT3

The Bad
Sadly the FT3 will not accept the Non-AI lenses; the coupling pin is missing from the camera body. While not a big issue for me as I have all AI/AI-S glass, it could be for someone who is using it to replace an older Nikkormat body. There are a few usability issues that I have with the camera that could be just because of age and my unfamiliarity with them. The first is the shutter speed control. The shutter speed dial is located on the lens mount, and while there is a nice handle, it is still not visible in the viewfinder which makes it a little difficult to operate the camera. Additionally, the slider for setting the film speed is a bit awkward to use as it is connected to a locking section of the shutter control handle. And last is a jumpy meter which could mean the camera just needs a good Clean, Lube, Adjust, but I have gotten good at catching a right meter reading before it jumps around. But since the FT3 is mechanical I can always fall back on Sunny-16.

CCR Review 46 - Nikon Nikkormat FT3

CCR Review 46 - Nikon Nikkormat FT3

The Lowdown
The FT3 is the perfect camera if you want a solid mechanical camera that won’t break the bank, and already have a collection of AI/AI-S glass. And even though they don’t say ‘Nikon’ on the front doesn’t mean they don’t have the same quality. And if the older Nikkormats are just as good as the FT3 the whole series of cameras gets my blessing. Just watch out and get one that can use the lenses you have on the model as older Nikkormats require you to have the coupling claws present on the lens.

Photos taken in Toronto, Ontario
Nikon Nikkormat FT3 – AI-S Nikkor 50mm 1:1.4 – Ilford FP4+ @ ASA-100 – Kodak D-23 (Stock) 6:00 @ 20C

CCR Review 44 – Nikon AF240SV

CCR Review 44 – Nikon AF240SV

If you grew up in the 1980s and 1990s, you’d first recognize the sound this camera makes when it takes a photo. It’s a total nostalgia fest from those long family vacations, holiday snaps, and trips to the amusement park. And you would be right; the Nikon AF240SV is a mom camera, designed to be as simple as possible the modern version of the ever present Kodak Camera from the 19th century. You press the button; it does the rest. While my family never used Nikon, we were mostly Minolta; it still was a trip back in time for me to use such a camera again.

CCR Review 44 - Nikon AF240SV

The Dirt
Make: Nikon
Model: AF240SV
Type: Point and Shoot
Format: 35mm, 24×35
Lens: Fixed, Nikon Lens 28mm 1:5.6
Year of Manufacture: 1980

CCR Review 44 - Nikon AF240SV

CCR Review 44 - Nikon AF240SV

The Good
So the one thing that blew me away about this camera is the lens. You would not think that some basic ‘mom’ camera would have a decent lens on it. But I was impressed with the quality of images that came out of this camera. Plus it’s a nice wide 28mm lens so you can get the whole family in the picture and the silly mascot. Next up is the battery power, now many cameras of a similar vintage would have some weird, camera-store particular battery that you would have to shell out twenty some odd bucks to buy. Not the AF240SV, it takes two AA batteries. So you could be at the theme park and be able to pick up spare batteries at the gift shop (and still may have to shell out a twenty for).

CCR Review 44 - Nikon AF240SV

CCR Review 44 - Nikon AF240SV

The Bad
Don’t expect to be doing anything advanced with this camera. Everything, everything is automatic. Focus, Loading, Rewind, Flash, Exposure. But sometimes simple is what you’re looking for then this is your camera. Probably the thing that is most annoying about this camera is that it’s a box, so it doesn’t hold well in the hand for a long period, and because of that, you can find that you’ll see some of your fingers in the image. So in reality, it’s just like it was when mom or dad was taking photos on family vacation. And finally, this camera gives little in the way of feedback, other than to tell you that your flash is charged and ready.

CCR Review 44 - Nikon AF240SV

CCR Review 44 - Nikon AF240SV

The Lowdown
Alright, so you have to remember I’m a user of fairly advanced cameras, so there has been a fair amount of snark in this review. But in all honestly, this is a pretty decent camera in the point-and-shoot field. I may go as far as to say this would make for an elegant camera to do street photography. You just have to point and shoot; the camera will do the rest for you! Plus you could even classify this as a toy camera even.

Photos Taken at Photostock 2016, Birchwood Inn, Harbor Springs, Michigan
Nikon AF240SV – Nikon Lens 28mm 1:5.6 – Kodak TMax 400 @ ASA-400 – Kodak HC-110 Dil. B 5:3- @ 20C

CCR Review 41 – Nikon F90

CCR Review 41 – Nikon F90

True to form, while the professionals were shooting the F4, many of those advanced semi-pro photographers were clamoring for something a little better than the entry level auto-focus SLRs. Nikon gave them the F90, in a system that Nikon keeps pretty much to this day. And what a camera the F90 turned out to be! This is a fast, accurate, and surprisingly quiet semi-professional camera that doesn’t feel like a cheap system despite the price they command on the used market (You can get a decent body for under 50$!). But don’t let the price scare you because you’re getting a whole lotta camera without dinging your wallet too much!

CCR Review 41 - Nikon F90

The Dirt
Make: Nikon
Model: F90
Type: Single Lens Reflex
Format: 35mm, 24×35
Lens: Interchangeable, Nikon F-Mount
Year of Manufacture: 1992-2001

CCR Review 41 - Nikon F90

CCR Review 41 - Nikon F90

The Good
This is one of those cameras that you really can’t say anything bad about it, or you want to wax poetic about it, so I’ll try and restrain myself. First off this camera is comfortable to handle and light weight without feeling overly cheap and plasticky either. It also packs the same matrix metering system that the Nikon F4 has inside it, which is one of my favourite meters next to the one in the F5. Next off the camera works great with both auto and manual focus lenses and AF is certainly a step up from the system in the F4 and is quick on the older D-Type lenses and the focus assist is nice and easy on manual focus lenses. As for ease of use, this is probably one of the easiest menu based cameras to operate because everything is laid out pretty clearly on the camera body and with a nice command dial even working in manual mode is nice because the aperture control is on the lens!

CCR Review 41 - Nikon F90

CCR Review 41 - Nikon F90

The Bad
While not really a bad thing over all, this camera doesn’t support the modern Nikon G-Type autofocus lenses completely. They will attach and auto focus but you can only run the camera in full program and shutter priority mode. While not a total loss, it does limit you in what you can do. And as someone who shoots mainly in aperture priority or manual, it means I can’t use my lovely 14-24mm f/2.8G lens completely with this camera. Another issue is that the F90 cannot support the vertical release that is found on the optional battery grip only the F90x/N90s can. But overall neither of these are real deal breakers on the camera, only minor annoyances.

CCR Review 41 - Nikon F90

CCR Review 41 - Nikon F90

The Lowdown
It isn’t like I need another strong autofocus Nikon SLR, I have the F5 and it is a nice piece of equipment, but it’s heavy. The F90 is the best of both worlds, it gives me a fast, accurate camera in a light weight package. Since I do most of my street shooting with the 105mm and an autofocus SLR the F90 gives me a smaller lighter camera to work with. Plus at the price point you can get these cameras at you can afford to have one in your collection! And if you already have the lenses you’re in luck!

All photos taken in Chicago, Illinois
Nikon F90 – AF Nikkor 35mm 1:2D – Rollei Retro 80s @ ASA-80 – Blazinal (1+25) 6:00 @ 20C