Like Ultrafine Extreme 100, the 400-speed flavour is another mystery as of where the film stock comes from. But when it comes to a budget-friendly film, it might be best not to ask too many questions. Extreme 400 is a stock that I have little experience with before I started this review, I had shot a single roll several years back for a camera review. And while, like Kentmere 400 I expected Extreme 400 to be of similar style and class, with heavy grain and low contrast in general. However, the film stock quickly proved me wrong as being inexpensive but far from cheap. FilmRead More →

If you’re a fan of the Polaroid Automatic Land Camera or old school pop-out folders, then the Lomography Belair X 6-12 will be a familiar camera. I’ll be referring to the camera as the Belair from now on. And while the Belair shares some design features of the Auto Land Camera, the two are very different cameras altogether. The Belair doesn’t try to be anything but a fun camera that sits nicely on the edge of being a toy camera. A fairly simplistic camera, but has one thing that drew me in, the giant 6×12 panoramic images and the interchangeable lens. Special thanks to AngelaRead More →

I’m keeping with the budget-friendly theme here and going with the Ultrafine Extreme films for this month. I’m not exactly sure where Ultrafine gets its film stocks from, but it certainly knows how to get a decent product. Ultrafine Extreme 100 appears to be a classic grained panchromatic film that offers fine grain and excellent sharpness. And it certainly does not break the bank. The film isn’t so much cheap as it is inexpensive, a roll of 35mm 24-exposure runs about five dollars Canadian. I can honestly say I’m impressed by this film and it certainly stands up to most conditions you can throw atRead More →

The North American film photography community can probably thank Mike Bitaxi for the introduction of Polypan F. And to make things more interesting, the film is not intended for pictorial work. Instead, Polypan F is a motion picture copy film. As such the film is a blue-sensitive orthochromatic film, but looking at it, you can hardly tell. But if there is one thing the film is known for it’s the GLOW, thanks to the lack of an anti-halation layer on the film. Sadly the film was discontinued, but there’s still plenty of bulk rolls floating around. Undoubtedly worthwhile trying if you come across it. IRead More →

Strike Back Like the Empire! Yes folks after a long wait, the FP4Party Strikes Back! And I’m back into the groove of things. And despite it being the start of term, it gives me all the more reason to get out and give the Rolleiflex and Mamiya m645 a bit of a winter workout. Especially the poor Mamiya which has been spending much of its time as a project camera. But sometimes I have to let it out to play a little bit more! This time around I shot only three rolls of 120 film for the January Party. But to switch it up, IRead More →

Svema, or by its proper name, Свема is a film stock that is relatively unknown here in North America unless you are of course fans of the Film Photography Podcast. The name comes from the combination of two Russian words, Светочувствительные Материалы, translated means Photosensitive Materials. If I had limited experience with the 100-speed version of the film, I have even less with Foto 400. The only time I’ve shot this roll I ended up with reasonably grainy, low-contrast images. So I wasn’t expecting much out the roll of film, but I soon found out that like Foto 100, I had greatly misjudged the filmRead More →

One thing that I feel that certainly helps any group is spending time together outside of the normal grind of the project you work together on. And for that, it’s the Classic Camera Revival podcast. I first started this idea last year as an end of year way to just get together have fun and do some talk about the next season for the podcast. This year our numbers were reduced due to illness and a broken ankle, but even with just the three of us good times were had in downtown Hamilton, Ontario. Hamilton and I have a long history, having a grandparent whoRead More →

Svema, or by its proper name, Свема, is a film stock that is relatively unknown here in North America. But if you’re a fan of the Film Photography Podcast you will have heard of Svema. It would be Svema Foto 200 that first burst onto the FPP scene, and quickly became a favourite film of Leslie Lazenby. The name comes from the combination of two Russian words, Светочувствительные Материалы, translated means Photosensitive Materials. A film stock I have limited experience with, having shot a couple of rolls beforehand. And while those first two rolls I was not too pleased with the results, I now haveRead More →

In the category of gone too soon is New55 and their amazing film stock, Atomic-X. Now, this isn’t the first time I’ve spoken on Atomic-X when they first started releasing just their negative material for their revival attempt at the iconic Polaroid Type 55, I grabbed a box of one-shot envelopes to try out. The Atomic-X negative was in reality based around their goal of a Postive/Negative material, however, when I tried the New55 PN I got no usable results, the envelopes fell apart on me or the chemicals failed to spread it just became a disaster. But when they offered up 25-sheet boxes ofRead More →

Many Kodak films have gained almost a cult following over the course of their run, and while many are general purpose films, Kodak produced many film stocks designed for specific tasks, and one such film is Technical Pan. Designed specifically for technical, scientific, and military applications the film can work as a high-contrast pictorial film and is one of the more unique film stocks I’ve had the pleasure to shoot. While it was out of production well before the official discontinuation date in 2004 due to the finding of a large master roll the film remains rather stable due to its lack of a boxRead More →