Gordon Drummond was the first Canadian Born Governor General of British North America and Commander-In-Chief of the British forces in the colonies that made up the region. Born in Quebec City on the 27th of September, 1772 but returned to England following the death of his Father in 1780. Educated at the Westminster School and joined the army as an Ensign in 1789 in the 1st of Foot (Royal Scots). He rose through the ranks quickly, achieving the rank of Lieutenant-Colonel by 1794, and Major-General by 1805, having seen combat in the Netherlands, Mediterranean, and the West Indies. He married Margaret Russell in 1807. Drummond’sRead More →

It ended with an explosion, but this is how it started, the sun creeping up over the historic fort, the trees, earthworks, masonry redoubts and blockhouses, tangled abatis, and rows of white tents. This was the scene early Saturday morning as near 1100 military reenactors started to crawl out of their tents and start to put on their uniforms, ready to put on a show the likes the site, or the neighborhood had ever seen. You see this year marks the 200th anniversary of the bloody siege of Fort Erie, the last major campaign on Canadian soil during the War of 1812. Sure there wasRead More →

By the end of summer 1814, the jig was up for the American invasion. While they had managed to strike at the British and nearly pushed them off the Niagara peninsula again, the new commander-in-chief of the British forces in Upper Canada was going to have none of that. Following the quick movements, it all turned around at the Battle of Lundy’s Lane and General Drummond managed to push the Americans back to their beachhead at the now heavily fortified Fort Erie where the Americans had started not a month earlier. And Drummond would begin his siege that would lead up to one of theRead More →

If you’ve ever crossed from Canada into the United States through one of the four land crossings in the Niagara Region, or have been shopping in Buffalo, there is an excellent chance that one of those crossings took place at Fort Erie on the Peace Bridge. If you’ve ever wondered how the small town got that name, take a drive just past the Mather Arch along Lakeshore Road, and you’ll find a small squat stone fort standing on a hill above Lake Erie. This is Olde Fort Erie and the source of the town’s eventual name of Fort Erie. The Old Fort is also oneRead More →

This was my fourth time attending the annual reenactment of the Siege of Fort Erie, it was probably one of the best I have been to yet! All the forces both Crown and US were in top shape this year, plus the sheer number of people watching and those marching was spectacular. Historically the events that lead up to the siege started on July 3rd 1814 when American Forces captured the fort from British Defenders. But it wasn’t until August 13th, 1814 that British forces under General Drummond opened fire. However it was his night attempt at taking back the fort that forced a failure.Read More →

It’s that time of year again to reenact the battle and camp out at Canada’s Bloodiest battlefield. Both US and Crown Forces were in top shape this year! Featured this post is the Fighting 60th, or rather 7th Battalion 60th Royal American Regiment of Foot, No. 6 Company. The 7th Battalion was formed of mostly German POWs who had been forced to fight for Napoleon over in Europe, but rather than languish in jail the British formed them into a unit specializing in light infantry tactics. The 7th Battalion No. 6 Company wore the rifle green of a rifle unit, however they were armed withRead More →