There are new developers, there are old developers, and then there is Rodinal. First released in 1891 by Agfa, Rodinal is the brainchild of the Doctor, not that Doctor, but Dr Momme Anderesen who disliked the reliance on hydroquinone in the traditional film developers of the day. Instead, he began work on using Aromatic Amines in 1880 before settling on p-aminophenol. The result is the developer we call today Rodinal. And for much of its life was a closely guarded secret by Agfa, at least until the patent expired. And while today Agfa exists, Rodinal has taken on many different forms, but the same formula.Read More →

One of the first History courses I took in High School was Canada in the 20th Century. Most Canadian history texts that are used in schools start at this point. And there’s no surprise. As a nation, Canada came into its own in the 20th Century. Many point the crucible of World War One as the focal point. Others state the post World War Two era leading up to the 100th Anniversary of Confederation. But everything that happened in the 20th Century built on what happened before and the sins of the past were going to come back to haunt. As Canada emerged from theRead More →

The sheer amount of aid rendered to the Canadian Rebels and the fact that many raids by the rebels came from the United States again proved that Canada remained open to invasion as it always had before the rebellions and even before the War of 1812. It also showed that the post-war practice of reducing colonial garrisons as a cost-saving measure might not have been the best option indicated in the fact that Bond-Head sent all the regular troops in Upper Canada to shore up Colborne in Lower Canada. While the militia enjoyed many victories in 1837 but these were against poorly armed and leadRead More →

There are many activities that Canadians love in the winter; there is none more Canadian than ice skating. To make it even more Canadian you ice skate on the Rideau Canal. But the world’s longest skate way was originally designed for a completely different use in mind than a key feature in Ottawa, Ontario’s Winterlude festival. Built during the same period as the First Welland Canal, the Rideau Canal addressed the concerns raised during the War of 1812, where the St. Lawerence River provided the only path for supplies to arrive in Upper Canada from Quebec City, Montreal, Halifax and England herself. Travel on theRead More →

Nothing like making the best out of a bad situation, but at least it wasn’t raining. Week 32 I found myself again lurking around Cleveland, Ohio for the Northeast Ohio APUG meetup (NEOH APUG) hosted by the wonderful John and Dolly Powers. The Sunday found us down at the lake shore trying to get shots of these tug boats, the entire fleet of tugs for the Great Lakes Shipyard nearby. The morning rain storm turned into blazing overhead light, less than ideal certimstances to photograph in, but rather than risk it raining again later, I sort of looked around for the best spot in theRead More →

This is what happens when you don’t double check things, you get awful flare that takes out a whole top section of your photo. But rather than groan about it, I posted it anyways, because that’s a rule I laid out for myself. But enough about mistakes (I really should’ve swung the camera around and shot High Falls instead…) this is probably my favourite spot to eat in all of Rochester (Dog Town is a close second), the Genesee Brew House, a brew pub attached to the Genesee Brewery with a full selection of their beers and some pretty amazing food. Genesee traces it’s legacyRead More →

It’s great when professional jobs can link into a personal project. It happened a couple times back in my original 52-Roll Project, namely the wedding of Laura & Mark. So when I was approached by the up and coming country rock band, A Mad World, My Masters, I inquired if they’d be willing to be featured in this year’s sheet-a-week project. They agreed, it helps that the lead singer of the band is an old and very good friend of mine who has graced my lenses in the past. The shoot was amazing. It’s always a plus when you get a chance to work withRead More →

Despite the title, this is not the famous Flanders Field. But rather the iconic cemetery at the St. Ignatius, a well known spot for anyone who attends the Photostock event held nearby at the Birchwood Inn (Harbor Springs, MI). The Church, a Jesuit mission was first built in 1741, a fire burned it down in the 1820s, but it was rebuilt in 1823, if you look close enough you can see the steeple from the M-119 as you drive along it. I had visited the cemetery the night before to get a feel for the location before taking this shot, even going as far asRead More →

From 1645 to 1885 the red coat of the British Army was both feared and respected, this army of as General Sir Arthur Wellesley the Duke of Wellington put it, the scum of the Earth, drilled and disciplined into one of the most effective fighting forces the world had seen, and helped Britain build an empire that spanned the globe. Week 25 is for my friend Col. Anne whom I met through tumblr and our mutual interest in Military history. Specifically the late 18th to early 19th century. The gentleman portrayed here is dressed in the uniform of the 8th (King’s) Regiment of Foot asRead More →

Soldiers, Sailors and Airmen of the Allied Expeditionary Force! You are about to embark upon a great crusade, toward which we have striven these many months. The eyes of the world are upon you. – Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower D-Day: 6th of June, 1944 H-Hour: 06:30 Yes, you read that right, today marks the 70th anniversary of the D-Day landings, Operation Neptune. As I type this, I can feel the tears stinging my eyes. Operation Neptune, was the code name given to the Normandy landings on the coast of France in an effort to push back the Nazis and dislodge them from the Atlantic wall,Read More →