When the United States of America declared war on the British Empire, they knew they could not go toe to toe with the might of the British Navy. Instead, they invaded the closest British held territory, Upper, and Lower Canada. Not all the citizens in the British-controlled colony were on the side of the Empire, many in fact supported the American invasion and wanted to see the British influences in North America removed. Some left Upper Canada for the USA, and some others chose to help the Americans on the Canadian side of the border. Most citizens of Upper Canada supported the British Forces, manyRead More →

The term Burlington Heights is a misnomer, as the Heights are technically located in Hamilton. But during the Anglo-American War of 1812, Burlington Heights became home to an often forgotten fort. Burlington Heights started life as a simple farm owned by Richard Besley. When the Americans invaded and captured the Niagara Region in May 1813 and forced the full retreat of the British Army of the Center, they would establish an armed camp at Burlington Heights, today located at the border of Hamilton, Ontario and Burlington, Ontario. It would start as a simple structure with field fortifications to provide a rallying point for the BritishRead More →

Well we’re coming up to the end of 2011, and what a year it has been, with the Project:52 winding down, the the last rolls sitting here on my desk waiting to be taken into the lab on Monday. 2012, big things for this year including 2 special projects. Sorry no Project:52 for 2012 (it may return for 2013), but 2012, big year indeed. The first project is about the War of 1812, 200 years ago between the United States of America and the British Empire. Titled “Everything Changes,” it will cover as much about the war of 1812 as I can possible get forRead More →

I have seen the grand Fort Niagara from across the river in Niagara-On-The-Lake so I finally took time to go and see the oldest fort in the area. The fort and the people there made the two hour border wait worth it! The history of the site started back in 1678 when the French established their first fort. The current construction is a mixed bag of French buildings from 1688 to 1759, British who took the Fort from the French in a siege in 1759. The British were forced to hand over the fort to the United States at the end of the Revolutionary War,Read More →

This was my fourth time attending the annual reenactment of the Siege of Fort Erie, it was probably one of the best I have been to yet! All the forces both Crown and US were in top shape this year, plus the sheer number of people watching and those marching was spectacular. Historically the events that lead up to the siege started on July 3rd 1814 when American Forces captured the fort from British Defenders. But it wasn’t until August 13th, 1814 that British forces under General Drummond opened fire. However it was his night attempt at taking back the fort that forced a failure.Read More →

It’s that time of year again to reenact the battle and camp out at Canada’s Bloodiest battlefield. Both US and Crown Forces were in top shape this year! Featured this post is the Fighting 60th, or rather 7th Battalion 60th Royal American Regiment of Foot, No. 6 Company. The 7th Battalion was formed of mostly German POWs who had been forced to fight for Napoleon over in Europe, but rather than languish in jail the British formed them into a unit specializing in light infantry tactics. The 7th Battalion No. 6 Company wore the rifle green of a rifle unit, however they were armed withRead More →

Back to the Siege for Week 22. It’s always fun carrying around classic or strange cameras it always makes for an interesting conversation piece especially when I’m out and around using it. These shots are mostly from around the fort and camps not of actual battles since a TLR takes a bit of effort to use and battles happen fairly fast, event during a war of 1812 reenactment. But despite the rain and mud I still brought it along and ran some HP5 through it to give that nice classic look. The Saturday Morning Parade Breakfast! Yes, some people even shy off modern conveniences andRead More →

May 5th 1813 the ground around Fort Meigs was mud, there was no way to keep our uniforms clean, but at least we kept our powder dry and muskets clean. Inside the wooden stockade walls that surrounded the fort we could make out giant traverses throughout the entire area. I caught word that an officers who had been returned after capture described the Americans as “an army of groundhogs” as they had dug holes into the traverses for shelter. Either way, those traverses will make it difficult for General Proctor to lay waste to the fort, and the mud won’t help either. The fort’s stockadeRead More →

Ever interested in joining the army? How about the British Army…circa 1812. Completed in 1802 when the British were forced to abandoned Fort Niagara across the river in accordance to the Jay Treaty of 1796, it became part of the defense of Upper Canada in the 19th Century. In 1813 the fort was captured by American forces who used it as a base to invade the rest of upper Canada, they were repulsed at Stoney Creek and Beaver Dams, the British were able to recapture the lost fort in December of 1813. During the First and Second World Wars the Fort was used as aRead More →