Tag Archives: delta 100

Exploring Ilford – Part 4 – Microphen

Another new developer for me and when I find a new developer I’m usually excited to see how different films react to it. And to make it even sweeter the Kodak equivalent, DK-50, is a developer I had never even heard of until now! According to the Ilford Product page this is a fine grain developer designed for push processing faster films. So for slow and medium speed films I chose to shoot at box speed, while faster films I went and did some pushing.

With Ilford FP4+
In all honesty you really can’t go wrong with FP4, this is one of those films that just always looks good in almost every developer I’ve run it through and the same can be said about FP4 and Microphen. Producing next to no grain and a pleasing grain at that and amazing sharpness and contrast. While it looks great in 35mm I would love to see what it does in Medium and Large formats…but that the topic of another set of blogs coming next year!

CCR - Review 24 - Nikon F3
Nikon F3 – AI-S Nikkor 105mm 1:2.5 – Ilford FP4+ @ ASA-125 – Ilford Microphen (1+1) @ 20C

CCR - Review 23 - Argus C3
Argus C3 – Argus Cintar 50mm f/3.5 – Ilford FP4+ @ ASA-125 – Ilford Microphen (1+1) @ 20C

With Ilford Delta 100
I actually found that Microphen pretty much produced a level playing field with the tradition FP4 and the modern Delta 100 films (and actually both take ten minutes in the soup). You get again contrast on point, no grain, and just overall a very pleasing and very printable negative as a result.

CCR - Review 25 - FPP Debonair
FPP Debonair – Super Lens 1:8/80MM – Ilford Delta 100 @ ~ASA-100 – Ilford Microphen (1+1) @ 20C

Hitchcock Would be Proud
FPP Debonair – Super Lens 1:8/80MM – Ilford Delta 100 @ ~ASA-100 – Ilford Microphen (1+1) @ 20C

With Ilford HP5+
Okay so I’ll admit I’ve been giving HP5 a bad wrap through the first three parts of exploring Ilford’s chemistry line. And that’s mostly because I’ve been shooting it in 35mm format. So I’m going to even the score a little and give the medium format a shot. Now this, this is what I like my B&W films to look like, smooth grain, even tones and good strong blacks and whites. HP5 even at ASA-400 in medium format really sings especially in Microphen. It really helps smooth out the grain and gives really good contrast.

TFSM - Summer '15 - The Streets
Hasselblad 500c – Carl Zeiss Planar 80mm 1:2.8 – Ilford HP5+ @ ASA-400 – Ilford Microphen (1+1) 12:00 @ 20C

TFSM - Summer '15 - The Streets
Hasselblad 500c – Carl Zeiss Planar 80mm 1:2.8 – Ilford HP5+ @ ASA-400 – Ilford Microphen (1+1) 12:00 @ 20C

With Kodak Tri-X
I’ve always been a fan of Tri-X and will remain a fan of Tri-X to my dying day. And while I’m usually wary of taking this film out of Kodak/Pyro chemistry when I shot it and developed in Perceptol I got some great results. So with Microphen being a developer good for push processing, and I do enjoy Tri-X at ASA-800 I gave it a shot and was rather pleased with the results!

CCR - Review 22 - Canon EOS-1n
Canon EOS-1n – Canon EF Lens 35mm 1:2.8 – Kodak Tri-X 400 @ ASA-800 – Ilford Microphen (1+1) 12:00 @ 20C

CCR - Review 22 - Canon EOS-1n
Canon EOS-1n – Canon EF Lens 35mm 1:2.8 – Kodak Tri-X 400 @ ASA-800 – Ilford Microphen (1+1) 12:00 @ 20C

With Ilford Pan F+ There are some films that just look great with all developers and others that only look good in one or two. Then there is the odd case where you find a film and developer combination that just looks like pure magic. Pan F remains hands down my favourite film from the Ilford line but when you pair it with Microphen it just goes to a whole other level of film nirvana. Throw on a contrast filter and you probably have the perfect film at least for me.

CCR - Review 22 - Nikon F5
Nikon F5 – AF Nikkor 50mm 1:1.4D (Green-1) – Ilford Pan F+ @ ASA-50 – Ilford Microphen (1+1) 6:00 @ 20C

CCR - Review 22 - Nikon F5
Nikon F5 – AF Nikkor 50mm 1:1.4D (Green-1) – Ilford Pan F+ @ ASA-50 – Ilford Microphen (1+1) 6:00 @ 20C

Like Perceptol this developer only comes in 1L kits and when I’m using 500mL of chemistry 1 to 1 it does go through a bottle fairly quickly so this time I bought two kits right off the bat. Overall I was really happy with this developer, and will certainly use it again especially if I do a project that would be best done on Pan F. And while this brings us to the end of exploring Ilford’s film chemistry line. Stay tuned for Part 5 where I go over the best and worst in the way of Ilford products at least in my humble opinion.

CCR Review 17 – Konica Autoreflex T4

I’m not often one for an underdog but this camera happened to draw me in when I first saw it and handled a T3 that my buddy James had gotten and this camera with a lens was just the right price. And while not probably my most favourite camera I’ve used through this series, the lenses are amazing and a system I’ll probably add to if just for the glass to use on a digital camera.

CCR - Review 17 - Konica Autoreflex T4

The Dirt
Make: Konica
Model: Autoreflex T4
Type: 35mm, Single Lens Reflex
Lens: Interchangable, Konica Bayonet Mount II (AR Mount)
Year Manufactured: 1978

CCR - Review 17 - Konica Autoreflex T4

CCR - Review 17 - Konica Autoreflex T4

The Good
The Hexanon lenses are seriously a sleeper system, butter for focus, and sharp as a tack, I mean really sharp, holy Hannah I was blown away by this glass! While I’m not a fan on the camera, I am a fan of the lenses, and do plan on getting more to adapt and use on my a6000 digital camera. But over all I did enjoy using this camera, well laid out, good meter and fantastic results. Oddly enough the leather cover on the body was nice a smooth and great to handle and makes the camera easy to hold.

CCR - Review 17 - Konica Autoreflex T4

CCR - Review 17 - Konica Autoreflex T4

The Bad
There are a few downsides to this camera. The first is more a personal preference is that you only have a shutter priority for the auto-exposure system. I’m more an aperture priority sort of guy and find having to manipulate the shutter speed a bit annoying. Even in manual mode it goes more to the aperture side of things rather than shutter speed. The second issue is cosmetic, the leather that covers the body with age does shrink a bit so it give the camera a bit of a rough look when it’s used. And finally again there’s the battery issue, I’m surprised to see a camera made so late into the 1970s to still use a mercury based battery, but being mechanical once it’s dead the camera will still function even without a working battery.

CCR - Review 17 - Konica Autoreflex T4

CCR - Review 17 - Konica Autoreflex T4

The Lowdown
If you’re a shutter-priority junkie and love an underdog camera the Autoflex T4 is your camera. If you’re a fan of great optics and focus on movie production and shoot film on the side it’s well worth the investment in the camera if you can find one with a kit of lenses because they are like butter, and bloody sharp. In addition to the 50mm that came with the camera I’ve already picked up the 35mm f/2.8 and eyeing the 135mm lens as well! For students I really won’t point them at this camera, but someone who wants something a little different than the average photographer this is a good choice. I mean I’ve only run into two other photographers who shoot the Konica system, my buddy James and Ryan Skelly.

All Photos shot in lovely downtown Findlay, Ohio
Konica Autoreflex T4 – Konica AR Hexanon 50mm F1.7 – Ilford Delta 100 – Ilfosol 3 (1+9) 5:00 @ 20C

CCR Review 20 – Yashica FR-1

The Yashica FR-I is another one of those late 20th century 35mm SLR, based on the Yashica FR and Contax RTS it’s an aperture priority camera which already gives it a plus in my books. And with the C/Y mount you have a pile of great lenses available. However the camera itself has, at least for me, some usability issues that really turned me off the camera as a whole.

CCR - Review 20 - Yashica FR-I

The Dirt
Make: Yashica
Model: FR-I
Type: 35mm, Single Lens Reflex
Lens: Interchangeable, Contax/Yashica Mount
Years Manufactured: 1977-1981

CCR - Review 20 - Yashica FR-I

The Good
Over all this is a comfortable camera to work with, clean lines, nice big shutter release, and easy to read settings in the viewfinder. The viewfinder is bright and offers an angled split-screen focus assist, which can be a bit weird at first but I managed to get used to it, and makes it handy for using both horizontal and vertical lines to ensure proper focus. Another solid point on the camera is that it uses the C/Y mount, so you have one of the largest selection of lenses out there including those made under licence from Carl Zeiss (which are just as good as the real thing, look at the Contax G2 for example).

CCR - Review 20 - Yashica FR-I

The Bad
Most of my issues with this camera are probably easily fixed however not many people service these cameras and having enough 35mm SLRs getting it fixed is not top on my list. So my biggest beef with this camera is that the meter is always on, but the meter display is not. You have to press a button on the top of the camera to activate the display in the viewfinder and the button is not in an easy to reach place. You have to lower the camera then press the button and bring it up again since the button is located by the film rewind between the pentaprisim. So not an easy place to go. There’s also no backup mechanical release on the camera so without a working battery the camera is dead.

CCR - Review 20 - Yashica FR-I

The Low Down
Unless you have an existing lens system I really would not recommend this camera. The FR-I while a solid feeling camera comes off as a bit cheap. The Yashica lenses don’t produce a good image in my view, so getting a better set of optics would be a must. Personally, go for one of the Contax bodies if you have C/Y lenses. Plus it takes an expensive battery that you really need to get to a specialized camera to store if it dies.

Photos shot in and around Sheridan College and my daily commute to and from
Yashica FR-I – Yashica 50mm 1:2 – Ilford Delta 100 @ ASA-50
Kodak TMax Developer (1+4) 7:30 @ 20C

CCR Review 16 – Nikon FM2

A mechanical beauty and one of Nikon’s highly sought after camera, the FM2 is probably one of my favourite cameras to bring along on photo walks if I’m want a solid light-weight camera with solid performance in any weather…and I mean any weather. Combine that level of performance with some amazing lenses and a great meter you have not only a great camera for someone who loves photography but one that’s great for someone who’s just starting off.

CCR - Review 16 - Nikon FM2n

The Dirt
Make: Nikon
Model: FM2n
Type: 35mm, Single Lens Reflex
Lens: Interchangable, Nikon F-Mount
Year Manufactured: 1982-2001

CCR - Review 16 - Nikon FM2n

CCR - Review 16 - Nikon FM2n

The Good
This is your basic, no-nonsense camera. Probably the part I like about this camera is that it’s fully mechanical. You don’t need a battery to use this camera, it works at every shutter speed and aperture with or without the battery. The only thing that uses the battery is the meter. Speaking of the meter this beautiful center-weighted meter is nice and accurate with the in viewfinder display showing a simple circle for proper, with a circle and a + or – to show 1/3 stop over or under respectively, then a + and – for over and under. Clear displays of shutter speed and aperture means you don’t have to take your eyes out of the scene to adjust. The camera is also really light weight and durable perfect for photowalks or travel when weight is an issue. Also being mechanical this camera will work in pretty much any condition. I’ve taken it out in near -30C weather and super hot as well, rain, snow and dirt. The camera just keeps working.

CCR - Review 16 - Nikon FM2n

CCR - Review 16 - Nikon FM2n

The Bad
Most cameras I’ve used I’ve been able to find some bad points on, the FM2 however I really can’t come up with much. I’m not staying this camera is perfect. It is fully mechanical, and can’t use every Nikon lens out there and it is manual focus. Personally the hardest part for me was figuring out how to turn it on to shoot, you have to flip out the film advance leaver slightly to get it going. Other than that I have no real complaints or ‘bad’ points about the camera.

CCR - Review 16 - Nikon FM2n

CCR - Review 16 - Nikon FM2n

The Lowdown
If you have Nikon manual focus or D-Type Nikon glass and want a fully mechanical 35mm camera then this is the one for you! Perfect for film lovers and those new to film and students! It’s almost a gateway into the wonderful world of film photography. Easy to use and well laid out. If you’re a fan or a user of the Nikon Df then this camera will be perfect for ‘pure’ photography as the Df is based off of the FM2/FE2. If you’re a student in a photography program and need a mechanical camera look no further. Plus you can find them pretty cheap the FM2, FM2n, and FM online.

If this hasn’t convinced you, check out Episode 52 of the Film Photography Project and Episode 7 of Classic Camera Revival for more FM2 talk!

All Photos shot in along N. High Street between the Columbus Camera Group and Midwest Photo Exchange in Columbus, Ohio
Nikon FM2n – AI-S Nikkor 50mm 1:1.4 (Yellow-15) – Ilford Delta 100 – Ilfosol 3 (1+9) 5:00 @ 20C

CCR Review 11 – Pentax 645

While generally an underdog camera in the 6×4.5 market, the Pentax 645 is by far my favourite of all the cameras within the line. Probably because you don’t see many of them kicking around. I know of only three other photographers in my area that use the camera. But unlike its contemporaries this wasn’t a system camera. You got the body and that was it there was little you could do. But because of that you got a camera that had a built in light meter, motordrive, and grip. Plus the backing of some fantastic optics!

CCR - Review 11 - Pentax 645
While a bit bulky the Pentax 645 is a well rounded medium format SLR.

The Dirt
Maker: Pentax
Model: 645
Type: Medium Format (120/220) Single Lens Reflex, 6×4.5
Lens: Interchangeable, Pentax K-Mount (645)
Year of Manufacture: 1984

CCR - Review 11 - Pentax 645

CCR - Review 11 - Pentax 645

The Good
This is a clean and easy to use camera, and it’s ready to go in all modes right out of the box. And it’s a workhorse. The built in grip, eye-level finder, and drive make it the perfect camera for weddings, photojournalism, or even generally carry around. I often describe it as my point-and-shoot medium format camera. Another nice feature on this camera is the dual tripod sockets. This means that when the camera is being used with a tripod you can easily switch from landscape to portrait mode by moving the camera rather than adjusting the tripod. Power for the camera comes from six AA batteries, which again seems like a lot but it also means you can get batteries for it pretty much anywhere in the world. And finally the line of lenses avalible for the camera is excellent, my personal favourite is the 35mm f/3.5 probably one of the best medium format ultra-wide lenses out there with zero distortion! Plus all the old manual focus lenses will work with the newer autofocus models (645n and 645nII).

CCR - Review 11 - Pentax 645

CCR - Review 11 - Pentax 645

The Bad
Probably the one thing that makes this camera an underdog is unlike the Maymia, Bronica, and Contax systems the Pentax 645 is not a system camera, what you get in the box is your camera. You can’t remove the eye-level finder, grip, or drive. The film is held in inserts rather than magazines so even swapping between rolls is impossible. The size/shape of the camera does make it an awkward camera to pack in a standard or smaller camera bag or backpack. While the average photographer may not need this, the camera only has a 1/60″ flash sync speed so working with strobes may be difficult as well.

CCR - Review 11 - Pentax 645

CCR - Review 11 - Pentax 645

The Low Down
If you’re looking for an easy way to get into medium format photography some will suggest the Mamyia m645 system, which is a great camera (and I’ll probably review one later on in this series) but for someone who needs a little helping hand, the Pentax 645 is great, any model. While the 645 is limited to a center-weighted meter, the 645n and nII bring in a great matrix (average) metering system which is (according to those who’ve used it) on par with the meter in the Nikon F4. Plus being an underdog camera you can probably get a good system on the cheap and have little contest in getting it. Just make sure that you get the 120 film inserts rather than 220. You’ll really only need one.

All Photos shot in Alisa Craig and Strathroy Ontario respectivly.
Pentax 645 – SMC Pentax A 645 35mm 1:3.5 – Ilford Delta 100 @ ASA-50 – Ilford Perceptol (1+1) 13:00 @ 20C

CCR Review 10 – Fed-2 (ФЭД-2)

You may think you’re looking at a Leica, and you would be partially correct. During the Second World War the Red Army carried back to the Soviet Block the contents of many factories that were in Germany, including photographic technology, equipment, and parts. Even colour film technology was removed from Agfa’s plant. So when you see not only Fed and Zorki cameras they are infact direct clones of Leica model cameras. Often being manufactured at less cost but suffered from one thing…quality control.

CCR - Review 10 - Fed-2 (ФЭД-2)
It may look like a Leica, but it sure isn’t one. And in someways it’s a bit better!

The Dirt
Maker: FED (ФЭД)
Model: Fed-2 (ФЭД-2)
Type: 35mm Rangefinder
Lens: Interchangeable, M39 Screwmount
Year of Manufacture: 1955-1970

CCR - Review 10 - Fed-2 (ФЭД-2)

CCR - Review 10 - Fed-2 (ФЭД-2)

The Good
What really set this camera apart for me is the film loading, unlike my Lieca IIIc of the same era being able to remove the entire back of the camera, although I still prefer the door style back, is a life saver. Saves frustrations, and no need to cut down the leader. The combined viewfinder and rangefinder also makes the camera just that bit easier to use. This is a solid chunk of metal you won’t forget that you have it in your hands. Over all the use of the camera is top notch, everything is laid out well and the big heavy shutter sound, shutter speed dial, and film advance is grab-able and works exactly how I’d expect it to work, having some experience with the older Leica style cameras.

CCR - Review 10 - Fed-2 (ФЭД-2)

CCR - Review 10 - Fed-2 (ФЭД-2)

The Bad
Like all Russian cameras of the era the quality control out of the plant was terrible, so you’ll often find a lemon. But don’t fear, these cameras are pretty easy to attempt to repair yourself, often just using a screwdriver, gun oil, and a sharpie (good if you have pinholes in the shutter curtain). And failing that you can always get another one fairly cheap and keep the other one for parts. This was the mark of Russian quality, not that it doesn’t break, but when it does break you can repair it yourself.

CCR - Review 10 - Fed-2 (ФЭД-2)

CCR - Review 10 - Fed-2 (ФЭД-2)

The Low Down
If you like the style of camera of those early Lieca’s but don’t have the budget for one the Fed-2 is a sound option, just make sure that you can test the camera out first before committing. Plus not only are the cameras fairly cheap the optics are as well. Jupiter and Industar lenses are actually fairly decent with unique looks. However with the ability of many newer compact system cameras (like the Olympus Digital PENs and Sony NEX series) the prices are starting to climb. The Feds are the camera to get for that classic rangefinder look and are often of better quality than the Zorki line. Worth a solid look and comes highly recommended by anyone who has used them.

All Photos shot in Niagara-On-The-Lake, Ontario
ФЭД-2 (Fed-2) – ЮПИТЕР-8 2/50 (Jupiter-8 2/50) – Ilford Delta 100 – Ilford Perceptol (1+1) 17:00 @ 20C

CCR Review 9 – Lomo Smena 8m (ЛОМО ϹМЕНА 8M)

Designed as the camera for Youth (Smena or ϹМЕНА roughly translated is Young Generation or Relay), the Smena 8m was a staple camera from the Leningrad Optical-Mechanical Union (LOMO) that really was the most basic of cameras out there. This simple viewfinder camera will either delight or frustrate you as it can be fairly complex to work with, which is rather odd since it was a Youth camera.

CCR - Review 9 - Lomo Smena 8m (ЛОМО ϹМЕНА 8M)
The ϹМЕНА 8M the strangest chunk of plastic the ruble can buy

The Dirt
Maker: Lomo (ЛОМО)
Model: Smena 8m (ϹМЕНА 8M)
Type: 35mm Viewfinder
Lens: Fixed, Lomo T-43 4/40 (T-43 4/40 ЛОМО)
Year of Manufacture: 1970-1995

CCR - Review 9 - Lomo Smena 8m (ЛОМО ϹМЕНА 8M)

CCR - Review 9 - Lomo Smena 8m (ЛОМО ϹМЕНА 8M)

The Good
Actually the best part about this camera is the lens, with most of the camera being plastic suddenly being presented with a glass Triplet Lens is a welcome surprise. But like most Russian optics you have a defined fall off around the edges but even they are pleasing. The camera is also light-weight and a rather inexpensive way to get into the world of Lomography as the camera was mass produced and was fairly prolific and one of the more popular cameras to come out of the factory.

CCR - Review 9 - Lomo Smena 8m (ЛОМО ϹМЕНА 8M)

CCR - Review 9 - Lomo Smena 8m (ЛОМО ϹМЕНА 8M)

The Bad
I don’t often rail against a camera, but this has a lot of issues I’ve found. First off this is a cheap mass produced camera and the Russian camera companies were not exactly known for good quality control. The camera is just in general difficult to use, two steps for advancing and cocking the shutter, and a separate release for the shutter. You also have to hold down the shutter release when rewinding the film. The film shutter speeds are shown by icons (while the focusing is set in numerical meters) however on the bottom of the lens barrel is the actual numerical shutter speeds., and the aperture is tied to film speeds, which is listed in DIN and ASA. Some of the listed speeds are familiar like 250 and 32, there’s also 130, 65, and 16. I can only assume that they are tied to some of the GOST scale. Plus the aperture control dial probably isn’t that accurate so it’s just a wild guessing game, so if that’s your thing…go for it. And finally, the frame counter, don’t even try to get it to work, because it just doesn’t.

CCR - Review 9 - Lomo Smena 8m (ЛОМО ϹМЕНА 8M)

CCR - Review 9 - Lomo Smena 8m (ЛОМО ϹМЕНА 8M)

The Low Down
I’m not a fan of this camera, I’ve shot it only a handful of times and can’t seem to get the hang of it. It is really all about the love, and this is one that I have a general love-hate relationship with. Now I’m use to working with this “lo-fi” or “Lomography” cameras that can produce erratic and strange results that aren’t always perfect, and I’m cool with that. But this one…the Smena 8m…I just can’t find things that I even like or can fix. This time I approched it a little differently, using an external meter (Gossen Lunasix F), an external rangefinder (Ideal Rangefinder) and setting the aperture to roughly f/8 I actually was fairly pleased this time around while most of the images were underexposed (not the meter’s fault) it seems that the irregularities that creep into these cameras has hit my copy bad either the aperture is off or the shutter speeds or both so unless you really like this style of camera or style of photography I would warn you away from it.

All Photos shot in Downtown Milton, Ontario
ЛОМО ϹМЕНА 8M – T-43 4/40 ЛОМО – Ilford Delta 100 – Ilford Perceptol (1+1) 17:00 @ 20C

CCR Review 6 – Olympus Trip 35

Olympus seems to have a way of creating cult cameras and the Trip 35 is no different, this is a fantastic compact and fully automated camera that can fit in a pocket or bag. But don’t let the size give it away, the Trip 35 produces fantastic sharp images mostly thanks to the fantasic Zuiko lens. It’s a great way to get quality images in a compact camera.

CCR - Review 6 - Olympus Trip 35

The Dirt
Maker: Olympus
Model: Trip 35
Type: 35mm Point & Shoot Zone Focus
Lens: Fixed, Olympus D.Zuiko f=40mm 1:2.8 (Tessar Design)
Year of Manufacture: 1967-1984

CCR - Review 6 - Olympus Trip 35

CCR - Review 6 - Olympus Trip 35

The Good
No batteries here, the fully automated system can be used in any weather anywhere in the world without needing to seek out a camera store to get a battery. And as mentioned before the optics on the camera are fantastic for a compact point & shoot camera that produces sharp images at any aperture, and the 40mm focal length gives you a happy medium between the normal 50mm and the wide angle 28mm. Another feature that I really like about the camera is the red flag, this flag will let you know that there’s not enough light to actually take a photo, and to put on a flash (there is a hotshoe and PC socket).

CCR - Review 6 - Olympus Trip 35

CCR - Review 6 - Olympus Trip 35

The Bad
Like any camera with a selenium meter there’s a chance that the older models will start to suffer from the meter being burned out, mine is an earlier model but still going strong. There is also little in the way you can do a manual override, sure you can easily change the aperture on the camera, but having only two shutter speeds (1/40″ or 1/250″) there’s little adaptation you can do. But if you’re out shooting with the Trip 35, good chance you’re just leaving it in automatic. And finally zone focus, if you have poor spacial reckoning this might be an issue, although the focus icons (mountain, three bloaks, two bloaks, one bloak ect) do make it easy, you also have the actual distance scale, which for me is helpful.

CCR - Review 6 - Olympus Trip 35

CCR - Review 6 - Olympus Trip 35

The Low Down
If you like to travel light without loosing image quality the Trip 35 is for you, but make sure you are able to test the camera fully first! You don’t want to find one that has a burned out meter, or non-working red flag. But if you have a good camera, it really won’t let you down honestly. I’ve been running the camera for several years, not as much as I should be, but have never had a bad image out of the camera. It’s a great exercise in limiting yourself.

All Photos shot along College Street in Toronto, Ontario
Olympus Trip 35 – Olympus D.Zuiko f=40mm 1:2.8 – Ilford FP4+ – Ilford DD-X (1+4) 10:00 @ 20C

Project:1812 – The Forts

As part of the preparation for putting the entire project into book form, I’ve been going around and re-shooting many of the fortifications that were involved in the War of 1812 using large format film (4 inch by 5 inch), simply for practice and the quality it gives. Here are the first group of forts.

Project:1812 - Fort Wellington
Completed at the start of the war to protect the dockyard at Prescott a critical point in the movement of supplies between Upper Canada, Lower Canada and Halifax, Fort Wellington was never outright attacked during the war, rather troops from the garrison would only participate in the battles of Ogdensburg and Crysler’s Farm. Abandoned after the war, it was rebuilt in 1830s in response to the Upper Canada Rebellions. It was one of the first historic forts to be turned over to Parks Canada, today it stands restored to how it would look in 1846.

Project:1812 - Fort York
Constructed in 1793 to defend the newly established capital of York for Upper Canada, expanded in 1807 to answer the threat of war between the United States and Great Britain. The Fort was destroyed during the disastrous battle of York in April of 1813, and remained in ruins until later in 1813 when it was rebuilt and was able to repel a third attack in 1814. The fort continued to see military use well into the second world war, even though it had been officially purchased by the City of Toronto in 1903. Today it holds the largest collection of War of 1812 buildings in Canada.

Project:1812 - Fort Niagara
Fort Niagara has two unique distinctions, the oldest collection of brick buildings west of Quebec City and being the longest occupied military post in this part of North America. Fort Niagara today was first established by the French in 1687, the French Castle (pictured) was constructed in 1729 in response to rising tensions between the French and British empires. British forces laid siege to the Fort in 1759 during the Seven Years War (French-Indian War) capturing it. Under British control the fort was expanded and remained a loyalist strong hold during the American Revolution, eventually being turned over to the United States in 1796. The British recaptured the Fort in 1813, holding it until 1815. The United States Army maintained control of the Fort seeing use as an Army Base during the major conflicts in the 20th century. The restoration of the masonry fort (which had fallen into disuse) began in the 1920s. The Army turned the entire area over to the State in the 1960s, however the Coast Guard remains on the site even today.

Project:1812 - Fort Meigs
Constructed in the later part of 1812 and into the Winter of 1813 as part of a series of supply forts stretching up from Cincinnati to the Michigan border to provide lodging, defense, and supply points for the Army of the Northwest. Fort Meigs was the largest and key rally point for the army. The palisade enclosing 10 acres, 7 blockhouses, 2 magazines, 5 additional batteries, and support buildings for a garrison of 2,000 men. The fort came under siege in the spring of 1813 however the British were never able to breach the walls. When Harrison’s army marched in the fall of 1813 the entire fort was dismantled and reduced to a simple square palisade and single blockhouse. When the war finished the fort was abandoned and burned in 1815. The new owners of the land used it as a grazing pasture as they realized the importance of the area. It was visited in 1840 by William Henry Harrison during his run for the Presidency (which he eventually won). The fort was rebuilt and opened to the public in 1974 by the Ohio Historical Society after they purchased the land in 1960.

Project:1812 - Fort George
Fort George was completed in 1802 to provide the British Army a headquarters in Upper Canada after turning over Fort Niagara to the United States. There is an urban myth that the officers from Fort George and Fort Niagara were dining there when the declaration of war was received in 1812. The two forts exchanged cannon fire until the massive assault at the end of May of 1813 saw the fort captured by the Americans and the British driven out of the Niagara Region. When the Americans pulled back across the river in December of 1813 they destroyed much of the fort along with the town of Newark (Niagara-On-The-Lake). Rather than rebuild Fort George the British began construction of Fort Mississauga. By the 1820s only the original powder magazine was left standing. The land was used for farming purposes and even a golf course. However at the start of the First World War it was again used as a part of Camp Niagara which including Butler’s Barracks and Fort Mississauga. The fort was rebuilt in the 1930s to original plans.

Project:1812 - Fort Erie
The fort as it stands today is based off the third Fort Erie. The first two were destroyed during winter storms before the British moved it further away from the river in 1803. But the British never completed the fort and by the time war started in 1812 there was only a small garrison present. The British destroyed the fort in 1813 after the capture of Fort George. Construction again began in the Spring of 1814 however it was surrendered to the Americans in July. It was under American control that the fort saw completion and expansion. General Drummond laid siege to Fort Erie through August and September of 1814 but failed to dislodge the the American force stationed there. The Americans destroyed the fort and left it in ruins in November. British troops reoccupied the ruins in 1815 but never rebuilt the fort itself. It continued to see use as a military base through the rest of the 19th century. By the 20th the land became a popular picnic destination. Restoration efforts commenced in the 1930s and the fort was rebuilt to how it would have looked in 1813, and plays host to the largest 1812 reenactment event in Canada.

Limehouse

At the suggestion of a friend, and taking advantage of a beautiful Sunday afternoon I visited Limehouse Conservation area just a half-hour drive from my hometown. I never realized such a wonderful trail system exsisted so close! Ruins of old lime kilns, being able to climb up and through the Niagara Escarpment. Just made for an enjoyable afternoon. I should go back here again this summer, then fall, and of course winter. It’s so close, and the best part is that it’s free!

Right Of Way

A Kiln?

Rushing

Rock On

Limehouse Conservation Area - April 2012

Limehouse Conservation Area - April 2012

Limehouse Conservation Area - April 2012

Limehouse Conservation Area - April 2012

Nikon FM2 – AI-S Nikkor 50mm 1:1.4 – Kodak Portra 160
Rolleiflex 2.8F – Carl Zeiss Planar 80mm 1:2.8 – Ilford Delta 100