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We’ve covered a fair amount of ground this season on Classic Camera Revival and lots of cameras have been left in the dust. But we’re here at the end of the year to play a bit of catch-up and discuss those cameras that we didn’t have time to bring up during the year!

Cameras Featured on this show
Pentax K1000 – A student classic, while the favoured son of the K-Mount cameras it wasn’t the original. This is one of many cameras that is perfect for learning the photographic craft on! Simple, no-nonsense and can operate with or without the battery. Plus you have access to an amazing lineup of lenses that can still be had at an inexpensive cost. Alex received this camera from his Grandfather and isn’t getting rid of it this time around, unlike past K1000s that have passed through his toolkit.

CCR - Review 2 - Pentax K1000

Technical Details
Make: Pentax
Model: K1000
Type: Single Lens Reflex
Format: Minature, 135 (35mm), 36x24mm
Lens: Interchangeable, Pentax K-Mount
Year of Manufacture: 1979-1997

TFSM - Spring '15 - Queen StreetTFSM - Spring '15 - Queen StreetTFSM - Spring '15 - Queen Street

Pentax MX – The mechanical cousin of the Pentax ME, released in the wake of the Olympus OM-1 and the trend of making smaller SLRs. This is an all mechanical camera, that produces wonderful images!

Classic Camera Revival - Episode 36 - Last But Not Least

Technical Details
Make: Pentax
Model: MX
Type: Single Lens Reflex
Format: Minature, 135 (35mm), 36x24mm
Lens: Interchangeable, Pentax K-Mount
Year of Manufacture: 1976-1985

The DVP Looking NorthLower BayviewBroadview Station Bound Car

Mamiya 645AFD – Probably the newest camera we’ve ever featured on our show. The 645AFD is the second auto-focus model of the classic wedding photographer’s camera the Mamiya m645. The camera features full autofocus, magazine loading, and full auto-exposure. And certain newer versions of this camera can accept a digital back, but we don’t hold that against the camera.

Technical Details
Make: Mamiya
Model: 645AFD
Type: Single Lens Reflex
Format: Medium (120/220), 6×4.5
Lens: Interchangeable, Mamiya AF Mount
Year of Manufacture: 2001

TFS-02_28_16-03P400-001TFS-02_28_16-11

Voigtländer Bessa – When it comes to folders there are lots of good and bad cameras out there. This recent addition to Alex’s collection comes from his Uncle Harvey. And while the lack of a rangefinder for focus can see some issues, an external rangefinder helps out. Of course, the one issue he found is that the film winder shreds the plastic take-up reels. At least he has a collection of old metal ones.

CCR Review 70 - Voigtlander Bessa

Technical Details
Make: Voigtländer
Model: Bessa
Type: Point-And-Shoot
Format: Medium, 120/620, 6×4.5/6×9
Lens: Fixed, Voigtländer Anastigmat Voigtar 1:4,5 F=11cm
Year of Manufacture: 1935-1937

St. JamesRise of the CondosFlatiron No. 1

Minolta Minoltina P – This beautiful little compact camera is Minolta’s response to the Olympus Trip 35. Compact, semi-automatic with zone focusing. Plus add a Rokkor lens and you have a winning camera.

CCR Review 45 - Minolta Minoltina-P

Technical Details
Make: Minolta
Model: Minoltina P
Type: Point-And-Shoot
Format: Minature, 135 (35mm), 36x24mm
Lens: Fixed, Minolta Rokkor 1:2.8 f=38mm
Year of Manufacture: 1963

CCR Review 45 - Minolta Minoltina-PSolitaireSolitude

Kiev 3a – John opted to stick with this Russian copy of the Contax III rangefinder and selling off his Contax IIIa to co-host Alex, who loves it! The reason? Lenses! Most Jupiter lenses that are based on the Contax RF mount won’t actually mount on post-war Contax rangefinders. Something Alex found out the hard way.

Classic Camera Revival - Episode 36 - Last But Not Least

Technical Details
Make: Arsenal
Model: Kiev 3a
Type: Rangefinder
Format: Minature, 135 (35mm), 36x24mm
Lens: Interchangeable, Contax RF Mount (Pre-War)
Year of Manufacture: 1954-1959

Kiev plus Jupiter 12Kiev plus Jupiter 12Kiev plus Jupiter 12

Minolta Autocord – Minolta’s answer to the Yashica. This lovely metered TLR is a great camera and one of Bill’s favourites when he doesn’t want to lug along the fridge of his Mamyia C-Series. Of course given the age, the camera does need to go into service soon.

Classic Camera Revival - Episode 36 - Last But Not Least

Technical Details
Make: Minolta
Model: Autocord CdS III
Type: Twin Lens Reflex
Format: Medium, 120/220, 6×6
Lens: Fixed, Minolta Rokkor 1:3.5 f=75mm
Year of Manufacture: 1966

Lakeshore Rd. Monday MorningDon Jail_Front St. on Saturday Morning_

Ricoh Diacord L – While this camera has been on our show before and lovingly called the DOAcord. But with a little love, and a stern talking to this camera is a strong performer!

CCR Review 75 - Ricoh Diacord L

Technical Details
Make: Ricoh
Model: Diacord L
Type: Twin Lens Reflex
Format: Medium (120), 6×6
Lens: Fixed, Rikenon 1:3.5 f=8cm
Year of Manufacture: 1957

CCR Review 75 - Ricoh Diacord LMill Pond - Diacord LMill Pond - Diacord L

Yashica 124G – A recent acquisition for Donna, sadly she hasn’t had the chance to take it out to shoot yet!

Technical Details
Make: Yashica
Model: Yashicamat 124G
Type: Twin Lens Reflex
Format: Medium (120/220), 6×6
Lens: Fixed, Yashinon f=8cm 1:3.5
Year of Manufacture: 1970-1986

Fomapan – An Inexpensive Classic
Foma is a polarizing film, either you like it or you don’t. While the whole gang enjoys Foma 100, they’re not too pleased with 200 or 400.

Fomapan 100 – Some examples of Fomapan 100
TFSM - Spring '17Old Rusted ChainguardAfter the Storm

Fomapan 200 – Some examples of Fomapan 200
The Sailor (Again)Barn

Fomapan 400 – Some examples of Fomapan 400
Still Bananas

Looking for a good spot to get your gear and material fix check out Burlington Camera (Burlington, ON), Downtown Camera (Toronto, ON), Film Plus (Toronto, ON), Belle Arte Camera (Hamilton, ON), Pond’s FotoSource (Guleph, ON), Foto Art Camera (Owen Sound, ON). Out West there’s The Camera Store (Calgary, AB) and Beau Photo Supply (Vancouver, BC). Additionally you can order online at Argentix (Quebec), buyfilm.ca (Ontario), the Film Photography Project or Freestyle Photographic.

Also you can connect with us through email: classiccamerarevivial[at]gmail[dot]com or by Facebook, we’re at Classic Camera Revival or even Twitter @ccamerarevival

5 Comments

  1. Did I hear someone say “Maybe they should get ride of the 200”? No, must be mistaken as Fomapan 200 is my absolute favorite!

    1. Author

      I don’t think they should get rid of Foma 200, although everyone is entitled to their own view.

  2. “John opted to stick with this Russian copy of the Contax IIIa rangefinder rather than the Contax IIIa itself.”

    The pictured Kiev rangefinder is a replica of the Zeiss Ikon Contax III manufactured in Dresden prior to and during World War Two, and not of the Contax IIIa, which was produced by Zeiss Ikon in Stuttgart after the war. Similarly the unmetered Kiev rangefinders were based on the Contax II rangefinder, the IIa being the new post-war “improved” rangefinder from Stuttgart which complemented the metered IIIa.
    Regards,
    Brett

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