Category Archives: Classic Camera Revival

Show Notes for the Classic Camera Revival Podcast

Classic Camera Revival – Episode 29 – Clan O’Canon

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So it seems that our hosts don’t shoot much in the way of Canon cameras, but we do have a decent selection not to mention the full lineup of the professional Canon F-1 cameras!

Cameras Featured on Today’s Episode

Canon F-1 – The F-1 was the direct answer to the Nikon F2. This professional system camera also introduced the famous Canon FD mount and remained fairly similar; there was a slight upgrade in 1976 with the Canon F-1n that made some minor changes both to the operation and cosmetics.

Classic Camera Revival - Episode 29 - Clan O'Canon

  • Make: Canon
  • Model: F-1
  • Type: Single Lens Reflex
  • Format: 135/35mm, 36x24mm
  • Lens: Interchangable, Canon FD Mount
  • Year of Manufacture: 1970, 1976 (F-1n)

Cleveland - Downtown
Canon F-1 – Canon Lens FD 28mm 1:2.8 – Fuji Neopan SS @ ASA-100 – Kodak Xtol (1+1)

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Canon F-1n – Canon Lens FD 28mm 1:2.8 – Fuji Pro 400H

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Canon F-1n – Canon Lens FD 28mm 1:2.8 – Fuji Pro 400H

Canon F-1N – The Canon F-1N is a full upgrade to the classic F-1, with a new prism, and plenty of bells and whistles that kept the old pro camera running until the introduction of the Autofocus EOS system.

Classic Camera Revival - Episode 29 - Clan O'Canon

  • Make: Canon
  • Model: F-1N
  • Type: Single Lens Reflex
  • Format: 135/35mm, 36x24mm
  • Lens: Interchangable, Canon FD Mount
  • Year of Manufacture: 1986

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Canon F-1N – Canon Lens FD 28mm 1:2.8 – Ilford HP5+ – Kodak HC-110 Dil. B

The Local Arriving
Canon F-1N – Canon Lens FD 28mm 1:2.8 – ORWO UN54+ – Kodak Xtol (1+1)

Davisville Yards I
Canon F-1N – Canon Lens FD 50mm 1:1.4 SSC – Ilford HP5+ – Kodak HC-110 Dil. B

Canon FTb – The FTb is a favourite around the table, a mechanical beauty with the amazing QL (Quick Load) system that the team is surprised never made it into other Canon Cameras, especially the professional F-1 series.

Classic Camera Revival - Episode 29 - Clan O'Canon

  • Make: Canon
  • Model: FTb
  • Type: Single Lens Reflex
  • Format: 135/35mm, 36x24mm
  • Lens: Interchangable, Canon FD Mount
  • Year of Manufacture: 1971

Not Open yet.
Canon FTb – Canon FD Lens 50mm 1:1.4 – Fuji Pro 400H

CCR Review 59 - Canon FTb
Canon FTb – Canon FD Lens 50mm 1:1.8 – ORWO UN54 @ ASA-100 – Kodak HC-110 Dil. A 7:30 @ 20C

Snowbench
Canon FTb – Canon FD Lens 50mm 1:1.4 – Kodak ColorPlus 200 @ ASA-200

Canon EOS A-2 – The only EOS camera on the show the A-2 looks more like it was designed by Minolta then Canon. But don’t let that fool you, this is no entry level camera, the A-2 is a direct successor to the FD Mount A-1 series and aims more at the Advanced Amateur or Prosumer market.

Classic Camera Revival - Episode 29 - Clan O'Canon

  • Make: Canon
  • Model: EOS A-2
  • Type: Single Lens Reflex
  • Format: 135/35mm, 36x24mm
  • Lens: Interchangable, Canon EF Mount
  • Year of Manufacture: 1992-2000

CCR - EOS A2
Canon EOS A2 – Canon EF 28-105mm 1:3.5-4.5 – Kodak TMAX 100 – SPUR HRX (1+19) 12:30

CCR - Canon Cast - EOSA2
Canon EOS A2 – Canon EF 28-105mm 1:3.5-4.5 – Kodak TMAX 100 – SPUR HRX (1+19) 12:30

CCR - Canon Cast - EOSA2
Canon EOS A2 – Canon EF 28-105mm 1:3.5-4.5 – Kodak TMAX 100 – SPUR HRX (1+19) 12:30

Looking for a good spot to get your gear and material fix…check out Burlington Camera, Downtown Camera, Film Plus, Belle Arte Camera and Camtech, if you’re in the GTA region of Ontario. In Guelph there’s Pond’s FotoSource For those further north you can visit Foto Art Camera in Owen Sound. On the West Coast (British Columbia) check out Beau Photo Supply. Additionally you can order online at Argentix (Quebec), buyfilm.ca (Ontario), the Film Photography Project or Freestyle Photographic.

Also you can connect with us through email: classiccamerarevivial[at]gmail[dot]com or by Facebook, we’re at Classic Camera Revival or even Twitter @ccamerarevival

CCR Review 63 – Ricoh 500 G

I have and always will have a soft spot for compact fixed lens rangefinders since my first camera was one such camera. The Minolta Hi-Matic 7s. But the Ricoh 500 G is not a Hi-Matic, released at the end of the craze of that style of camera; it is an underdog for its time going up against the cult classic Canon QL17 GIII. And while the 500 G does not share the same spotlight at its Canon counterpart, the 500 G is a strong camera that fills the role of compact rangefinder that packs a punch but won’t break the bank. Special thanks to Mike Bitaxi for loaning this beauty out.

CCR Review 63 - Ricoh 500 G

The Dirt

  • Make: Ricoh
  • Model: 500 G
  • Type: Rangefinder
  • Format: 135 (35mm), 36×24
  • Len: Fixed, Rikenon Lens f=40mm 1:2.8
  • Year of Manufacture: 1972

CCR Review 63 - Ricoh 500 G

CCR Review 63 - Ricoh 500 G

The Good
If you’re into compact rangefinders, this camera is certainly worth a second glance. This camera is small; I mean tiny. Easily fits in your pocket but I wouldn’t recommend it. When it comes to using the camera, it’s a natural fit for anyone with any experience with Minolta, Olympus, or Canon cameras of the same style. Good layout, short throw on the film advance, and an aperture priority meter to boot. But you don’t need to power this camera to get it to work and runs well as a mechanical camera, but I would still stick to aperture priority, set your aperture and run the shutter speed around it. I’ll go into that more in the next section. Optically the camera stands well on its own with the Rikenon Lens pulling off sharp images that suit the focal length perfectly. Add to this the compact size of the camera you have very little in the way of parallax error when composing your images, out of my whole roll shot I only missed the composition on one image and it was out of focus also so it was not a big deal.

CCR Review 63 - Ricoh 500 G

CCR Review 63 - Ricoh 500 G

The Bad
The main issue I had with this camera is that all the controls along the lens barrel are too close together! The aperture control is narrow and tight to the body, and you need two hands to control it. The shutter speed dial is a little better but feels too much like the focus control with the extra grips. The focusing is smooth, but again you’d think it was the shutter speed control at first as it lacks the usual grip pieces. As an automatic aperture priority camera, it wouldn’t be so bad, but I did not have the proper battery for the camera, so I was running it full manual, as you guessed it the camera uses a mercury cell to operate. And finally, there’s the issue of light seals. The entire back door of the camera is one big light seal, every square centimeter of it is covered. Thankfully it’s easy to replace with craft foam, but it makes for a very messy job.

CCR Review 63 - Ricoh 500 G

CCR Review 63 - Ricoh 500 G

The Lowdown
If you’re looking for a camera to work as a compact low-profile street photography camera but don’t want to spend the cash on a camera give the 500 G a solid look. If you find one in good condition, you’ll be laughing. While I’m one to stick with cult cameras, it seems odd that this camera didn’t acquire one. It’s a real sleeper like the Minolta Hi-Matics, and they often don’t command a higher price like Canon or Olympus but quickly give you the same performance of the well known shooters.

All Photos taken in New York, New York
Ricoh 500 G – Rikenon Lens f=40mm 1:2.8 – Ilford FP4+ @ ASA-100 – SPUR HRX (1+20) 9:30 @ 20C

CCR Review 62 – Canon T90

The Canon T90 is a camera since I first laid eyes on it during the first season of the Classic Camera Revival Podcast, I think it was even at the first recording session we did. While the T-Series of cameras are not well viewed, many of them cheap and looking more like that 1980s VCR look you find with the early Minolta Maxxums, the T90 is the odd-man out in the series. Big thanks to Mike Bitaxi for the loan!

CCR Review 62 - Canon T90

The Dirt

  • Make: Canon
  • Model: T90
  • Type: Single Lens Reflex
  • Format: 135 (35mm), 36×24
  • Len: Interchangeable, Canon FD Mount
  • Year of Manufacture: 1986-1987

CCR Review 62 - Canon T90

CCR Review 62 - Canon T90

The Good
If you’ve read through many of these reviews, and if you’re still around, thank you, but the biggest thing I can be overly critical about is the physical feel of a camera. The T90 is no slouch, while the majority of the T-Series are boxes, the T90 is a sleek killing machine. Boxy angles are replaced with smooth lines, something you would see in a modern SLR. This makes the camera comfortable to handle and use even for an extended period. And despite the added weight from the larger size and the six AA batteries that power it, the camera is well balanced. Speaking of the AA batteries, the camera can be powered no matter where you find yourself. General use is spot on, with automatic film loading that seems to come out of the Quick Load system. Then there is the meter, even in the appalling weather I was shooting the camera in, and rain spotted lens the meter was spot on with the exposure, and that was running it in full auto-exposure. I’m sure the same power would be brought for semi-automatic and manual modes. And finally, you can get one relatively cheap on the used market not to mention a broad range of inexpensive glass in the FD mount.

CCR Review 62 - Canon T90

CCR Review 62 - Canon T90

The Bad
Just don’t forget that we’re talking about a thirty-year-old camera, and the biggest issue that the T90 suffers is the electronic failure. If you’re a shooter of the T90, you have heard of the dreaded EEE error. Of course, that means that you’ll need to either get a repair done on it or simply replace the unit. At least there’s still a camera shop out there that can do a full refurbishment on the camera. Despite how well the camera handles it suffers from the one big issue that I have with all Canon cameras, the lack of a second command dial. Now most later EOS cameras have a second thumb dial on the camera back; the T90 lacks this. I guess I’m just used to that on Nikons, but it does pose an issue when shooting outside of semi and fully automatic exposure modes. And finally the buttons are difficult to understand what they’re for without a manual, it took the help of Mike to figure out how to put the camera in Auto-Exposure and Matrix/Average metering mode.

CCR Review 62 - Canon T90

CCR Review 62 - Canon T90

The Lowdown
The T90 is an odd-duck of a camera, and I’m surprised it was never marketed to the Professional market, like the T-1 to bring a sleeker camera to the market with all new features than keeping the old F-1 line going. I mean the camera itself has your favourite parts of the Nikon F3 and the best parts of the F4, and you have something close to the T90. It’s a camera that is perfect for anyone who has a large selection of FD mount lenses. The trouble is that shortly after the T90 came out, Minolta released the autofocus system with the Maxxum line of cameras and Canon was quick on the take and released the EOS system shortly after the T90 rendering the camera and the entire manual focus line of cameras and lenses obsolete.

All Photos taken in Acton, Ontario, Canada
Canon T90 – Vivitar Auto Wide-Angle f=28mm 1:2.5 – JCH Streetpan 400 @ ASA-400 – Blazinal (1+50) 22:00 @ 20C

Classic Camera Revival – Episode 28 – The K-Team

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Pentax, the name that is always linked with the student special K1000, however, Pentax had a broad range of fantastic cameras, and for this episode, the gang takes a look at their shelves to discover the hidden gems that they have from the Pentax line.

Cameras Featured on Today’s Episode

Pentax Spotmatic SP F – While not the original Pentax SLR, it certain is a big step forward with automatic lenses and TTL metering. A worthy camera for any manual shooter plue the Super-Takumar lenses have a fantastic repuation not to mention a plethora of M42 lenses will let this camera sing.

Classic Camera Revival - Episode 28 - The K-Team

  • Make: Pentax
  • Model: Spotmatic SP F
  • Type: Single Lens Reflex
  • Format: 135/35mm, 36x24mm
  • Lens: Interchangable, M42 Mount
  • Year of Manufacture: 1973

Classic Camera Revival Spotmatic F
Pentax Spotmatic F – SMC Takumar 50mm ƒ/1.4 – Tri-X400 @ ASA-1600 – HC-110 Dil. B – 11:00 @ 20C @ 20C

Classic Camera Revival Spotmatic F
Pentax Spotmatic F – SMC Takumar 50mm ƒ/1.4 – Tri-X400 @ ASA-1600 – HC-110 Dil. B – 11:00 @ 20C @ 20C

Classic Camera Revival Spotmatic F
Pentax Spotmatic F – SMC Takumar 50mm ƒ/1.4 – Tri-X400 @ ASA-1600 – HC-110 Dil. B – 11:00 @ 20C @ 20C

Pentax KX – While it doesn’t get the same level of press as the K1000, the KX is still a solid choice when it comes to K-Mount cameras and as Bill says it won’t let you down and won’t break the bank!

Classic Camera Revival - Episode 28 - The K-Team

  • Make: Pentax
  • Model: KX
  • Type: Single Lens Reflex
  • Format: 135/35mm, 36x24mm
  • Lens: Interchangable, Pentax K-Mount
  • Year of Manufacture: 1975–1977

The Outside Glen Morris Ruins_
Pentax KX – SMC Pentax 28mm 1:3.5 – Rollei RPX 400 – Kodak HC-110 Dil. B 6:00 @ 20C

VW Van_
Pentax KX – SMC Pentax 28mm 1:3.5 – Rollei RPX 400 – Kodak HC-110 Dil. B 6:00 @ 20C

The Iron Metcalfe St. Bridge_
Pentax KX – SMC Pentax 28mm 1:3.5 – Rollei RPX 400 – Kodak HC-110 Dil. B 6:00 @ 20C

Pentax ME – Don’t let this camera’s small size fool you, a solid addition to the Pentax line of cameras if semi-automatic and fully automatic functionality is something you look for in a camera.

Classic Camera Revival - Episode 28 - The K-Team

  • Make: Pentax
  • Model: ME
  • Type: Single Lens Reflex
  • Format: 135/35mm, 36x24mm
  • Lens: Interchangable, Pentax K-Mount
  • Year of Manufacture: 1977-1979


Pentax ME – SMC Pentax 50mm 1:1.7 – Kodak Tri-X 400 @ ASA-400 – Kodak TMax Developer (1+4) 6:00 @ 20C

Toronto Film Shooters Meet - October 2013
Pentax ME Super – SMC Pentax M 50mm 1:2 (Yellow Filter) – ORWO NP55 @ ASA-50 – HC-110 Dil. B 6:00 @ 20C

Toronto Film Shooters Meet - October 2013
Pentax ME Super – SMC Pentax M 50mm 1:2 (Yellow Filter) – ORWO NP55 @ ASA-50 – HC-110 Dil. B 6:00 @ 20C

Pentax 645 – A strong workhorse camera and the main medium format kit in Alex’s bag. It’s almost a point-and-shoot medium format camera and being an underdog doesn’t command as high a price point as its cousins from Mamyia and Contax do. If you do get one, go for the original and be sure to add the 35mm wide angle lens to your kit and watch out that you get the 120 insert.

CCR - Review 11 - Pentax 645

  • Make: Pentax
  • Model: 645
  • Type: Single Lens Reflex
  • Format: Medium Format, 120/220, 6×4.5cm
  • Lens: Interchangable, Pentax K645-Mount
  • Year of Manufacture: 1984-1997

City Methodist - Gary, IN
Pentax 645 – SMC Pentax 645 35mm 1:3.5 – Kodak Tri-X Pan (TXP) @ ASA-250 – PMK Pyro (1+2+100) 10:30 @ 24C

2013 Christmas Cards - Roll 3 Finalists
Pentax 645 – SMC Pentax 645 35mm 1:3.5 – Rollei Infrared @ ISO-25 – Blazinal 1+50 12:00 @ 20C

MCC - Classic Car Shoot
Pentax 645 – SMC Pentax A 645 75mm 1:2.8 – Kodak Tmax 100 (100TMX) – Kodak Tmax Developer (1+4) 7:30 @ 20C

Pentax 67II – This camera will pump you up! The Pentax 67II is the final entry in a long line of 6×7 medium format cameras from Pentax. For James it is better suited for studio work as you do feel it after a long day of shooting it in the field.

Classic Camera Revival - Episode 28 - The K-Team

  • Make: Pentax
  • Model: 67II
  • Type: Single Lens Reflex
  • Format: Medium Format, 120/220, 6x7cm
  • Lens: Interchangeable, Pentax K67-Mount
  • Year of Manufacture: 1998

Wagon Wheel 1
Pentax 67 – Super-Takumar 6×7 105mm 1:2.4 – Kodak TMax 400

By Lake Ontario
Pentax 67 – Super-Takumar 6×7 200mm 1:4 – Kodak Tri-X 400 – Kodak Xtol (1+1) 9:00 @ 20C

Guildwood in February
Pentax 67 – Super-Takumar 6×7 55mm 1:3.5 – Fuji Neopan Acros 100 @ ASA-80 – Rodinal (1+50) 13:30 @ 20C

New Film: Cinestill 800T in 120
Bill Smith recently had the chance to take a test run with the latest offering from Cinestill, their 800T film in 120. For those who don’t know Cinestill releases a line of film that is Kodak Vision3 motion picture film but during their rolling process removes the Remjet layer leaving a regular C-41 film. Now you can easily remove the Remjet layer in home processing or send it away to a couple of labs around the USA that do the ECN-2 process. You can even do a home ECN-2 process, but with Cinestill film, you don’t have to worry about all that.

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Mamiya C220F – Mamiya-Sekor 80mm 1:2.8 – Cinestill 800T Alpha

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Mamiya C220F – Mamiya-Sekor 80mm 1:2.8 – Cinestill 800T Alpha

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Mamiya C220F – Mamiya-Sekor 80mm 1:2.8 – Cinestill 800T Alpha

Looking for a good spot to get your gear and material fix…check out Burlington Camera, Downtown Camera, Film Plus, Belle Arte Camera and Camtech, if you’re in the GTA region of Ontario. In Guelph there’s Pond’s FotoSource For those further north you can visit Foto Art Camera in Owen Sound. On the West Coast (British Columbia) check out Beau Photo Supply. Additionally you can order online at Argentix (Quebec), the Film Photography Project or Freestyle Photographic.

Also you can connect with us through email: classiccamerarevivial[at]gmail[dot]com or by Facebook, we’re at Classic Camera Revival or even Twitter @ccamerarevival

CCR Review 61 – Exakta VX IIa

You don’t have to break a leg to get a kick out of using the Exakta VX IIa, but if you’re not careful if you drop it on your leg, it just may break the bone. I was a little wary of this camera at first. All the controls are on the left side. Thankfully it didn’t take much to get used to the odd layout, and luckily it didn’t take me 39 steps to get used to the machine. And I found it fairly intuitive after a while; there was no throwing this camera out the rear window, I’d by a psycho for doing such a thing.

CCR Review 61 - Exakta VX IIa

The Dirt

  • Make: Exakta
  • Model: VX IIa
  • Type: Single Lens Reflex
  • Format: 135 (35mm), 36×24
  • Len: Interchangeable, Exakta Bayonet
  • Year of Manufacture: 1956-1963

CCR Review 61 - Exakta VX IIa

CCR Review 61 - Exakta VX IIa

The Good
There are a few things that the genuinely awkward Exakta has going for it. The first item is the optics, beautiful sharp Carl Zeiss lenses, like the iconic Biotar makes this a camera worthwhile for the simple reason of image quality. Along the same line as the lens is the aperture opening lever. On the bottom of the lens barrel, there’s a pull lever that will open up the aperture as the camera doesn’t have an automatic aperture or TTL metering. So having the ability to set the aperture, open it up for focusing, then with a half push on the shutter release the lens stops down before tripping the shutter, gives the VX IIa somewhat of an easier operation. Then there’s the wonderful option of using a waist-level finder. Yes, you read that correctly, you can put a waist-level finder onto the Exakta. It does make for a different shooting experience with the camera and certainly makes using the left-handed controls a bit easier in the long run.

CCR Review 61 - Exakta VX IIa

CCR Review 61 - Exakta VX IIa

The Bad
Throw out everything you know about shooting SLRs; when you pick up an Exakta. I’m not sure of the reason behind this radical departure from the norm, but it certainly makes for a unique shooting experience. And it doesn’t stop there, nothing on this camera is quick and easy. You have to cut down the film leader to load the camera, and there’s little to no feedback on if you’ve loaded the film correctly. The film advance pulls down the meter and cocks the shutter, so it has the longest pull in any camera I’ve reviewed, it’s almost a full 180 degrees. Even rewinding the film, what should be the easiest task of them all is awkward, I lost about five or six frames because when I though I had rewound the film, I hadn’t and opened the back…twice. And finally, the shutter release takes a bit of an effort to push down. All these points combine to a rather awkward shooting experience, even more so than the Leica R3.

CCR Review 61 - Exakta VX IIa

CCR Review 61 - Exakta VX IIa

The Lowdown
If you want a serious challenge, with some great results, the Exakta VX IIa is the camera for you. Everything is mirrored, everything takes a lot more of an effort to operate and use. This isn’t a camera for quick and dirty operation. So I can see why a wheelchair-bound photographer would use the camera for spying on his neighbors in Alfred Hitchcock’s Rear Window. But if you do run with the camera, you won’t be disappointed in the images you get out of it.

All Photos Taken at Westfield Heritage Village, Rockton, Ontario
Exakta VX IIa – Carl Zeiss Jena Biotar 2/58 – Kodak TMax 100 @ ASA-100 – Kodak D-23 (Stock) 9:30 @ 20C

CCR Review 60 – KMZ Zenit E

Soviet cameras and I have had a rocky relationship. There’s only a handful out there that I like, and then there’s the Zenit E. This is a beautiful camera that is probably the pick of the litter from the Zenit line. One of my first SLRs was a Zenit B, the non-metered version of the E. And despite never getting a single frame from the camera. Because I had no clue what I was doing at the time, finding myself instantly familiar with the workings of the Zenit E and it certainly makes for a much better Soviet SLR than the other’s I’ve worked with in the past. Special thanks to James Lee for loaning out this camera for a review.

CCR Review 60 - KMZ Zenit E

The Dirt

  • Make: KMZ
  • Model: Zenit E
  • Type: Single Lens Reflex
  • Format: 135 (35mm), 36×24
  • Len: Interchangeable, M42 Screw Mount
  • Year of Manufacture: 1965-1968

CCR Review 60 - KMZ Zenit E

CCR Review 60 - KMZ Zenit E

The Good
There is nothing complicated about this camera. The operation, layout and general use of the camera make it easy for anyone to pickup and use. The only feature that this camera has is the uncoupled light meter, but more on that later. Despite the weight of the camera, it doesn’t detract from its use, although a nice heavy duty padded strap would be a good idea. A carbine style cross strap would be best. The M42 mount gives you a wide range of lenses to use on the camera both German and Soviet optics can easily mount on the camera. And as a bonus, most Soviet optics are direct copies of their German counterparts and often have their unique features that you don’t find in other lenses. Even though there is no automatic aperture on the camera that doesn’t detract from the operation, as you can easily set the aperture then open and close it with a simple twist ring that will stop at the correct aperture. The one thing to watch out for is the shutter speed dial; you can only set your shutter speed once the film has been advanced and shutter cocked, much like the rangefinders from the FED and Zorki line. Finally, there’s the sound of the camera, the noise the shutter and mirror make when in operation is substantial and pleasing, there’s no mistaking when you’ve fired a shot.

CCR Review 60 - KMZ Zenit E

CCR Review 60 - KMZ Zenit E

The Bad
Usually, if a camera has a selenium meter that tends to be a positive feature to a camera, no batteries needed, and usually still operates. In this case, however, the meter isn’t a handy thing to have on this camera. First, off the meter is uncoupled, this means that no matter how you adjust the camera settings the meter doesn’t react, there’s a second dial that you set to give you the camera settings based on the meter reading. Add to that the meter read out is on the top of the camera body only. It would be better to stick with Sunny-16 or an external meter. In addition to this, you’ll have a hard time ensure the correct film speed setting as the camera is calibrated more towards the old GOST scale with corresponding DIN numbers. Sadly these film speeds do not line up with most modern films, you do have options like GOST-130, but I’ve never seen that sort of film. There is also the matter of the long film advance crank, while a minor nuisance does make it difficult to fire off several shots in succession. And finally, I would be remiss if I didn’t mention that the Soviet Bloc did not have the best quality control so there is a chance that these cameras can break easily or purchased in a broken state. At least there’s a high chance with the right tools and manual you can do the repair yourself.

CCR Review 60 - KMZ Zenit E

CCR Review 60 - KMZ Zenit E

The Lowdown
Out of all the Soviet cameras I’ve reviewed to date, the Zenit E is only one of two that I would recommend picking up, but I would lean someone more towards a Zenit B, the non-metered version. Both are strong mechanical cameras that have a nice look and feel to take out on International Communist Camera day and are better than most of the later model Zenit cameras. But there is one thing that you should look for if you are thinking of getting one and that’s the lens. Most of these cameras shipped with and still come with a Helios 44-2 lens, this 58mm f/2 is a copy of the Carl Zeiss Biotar. It has also become somewhat of a cult lens in the portrait market even I have one that I use with my Sony a6000. The reason is that when you shoot a subject at about 5 feet away with the lens opened to f/2 you get a classic Petzval style swirl. So even if you get a broken Zenit, you still get an amazing lens to add to your collection.

All Photos Taken in Hamilton, Ontario
KMZ Zenit E – KMZ Helios 44-2 2/58 – Kodak TMax 100 @ ASA-100 – Kodak D-23 (Stock) 9:30 @ 20C

Classic Camera Revival – Episode 27 – Return of the Samurai

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The Nikkormat line was a series of SLRs released by Nikon through the 1960s to 70s that were aimed at the consumer market. While there were some electronic Nikkormat cameras the ones we have on the table today are the mechanical ones of the FT line. These are great cameras that you can have for a cheap price and still using all your Non-AI, AI, and AI-S lenses. AI and AI-S providing they still have the claw, unless you have the FT3.

Cameras Featured on Today’s Episode

Nikon Nikkormat FTn – An improved version of the original Nikkormat FT and the oldest one we have on the table. The meter coupling pin on the camera still had to be aligned with the meter coupling shoe on the lens, but the lens maximum aperture no longer had to be manually preset on the FTn. It also improved the lens mounting technique that you could rock the aperture back and forth so that the claw would catch on the pin.

Classic Camera Revival - Episode 27 - Return of the Samurai

  • Make: Nikon
  • Model: Nikkormat FTn
  • Type: Single Lens Reflex
  • Format: 35mm, 36x24mm
  • Lens: Interchangable, Nikon F
  • Year of Manufacture: 1967-1975

Dead Mill
Nikon Nikkormat FTn – Nikkor-H 50mm 1:2 – ORWO UN54+ @ ASA-100 – Kodak Xtol (1+1) 8:00 @ 20C

Scan-130425-0002
Nikon Nikkormat FTn – Nikkor-H 28mm 1:3.5 – ORWO UN54+ @ ASA-100 – Kodak Xtol (1+1) 8:00 @ 20C

Now Entering Leslieville.
Nikon Nikkormat FTn – Nikkor-O 35mm 1:2 – Kodak Tri-X 400 @ ASA-400 – Kodak HC-110 Dil. B 5:00 @ 20C

Nikon Nikkormat FT2 – Released as an answer to customer suggestions for improvement of the FTn. The FT2 would have a silver-oxide battery and a fixed hot shoe to mount and external flash. The FT2 also has a +/- in the match needle metering readout.

Classic Camera Revival - Episode 27 - Return of the Samurai

  • Make: Nikon
  • Model: Nikkormat FT2
  • Type: Single Lens Reflex
  • Format: 35mm, 36x24mm
  • Lens: Interchangable, Nikon F
  • Year of Manufacture: 1975-1977

Cherry Blossoms
Nikkormat FT2 – Tamrom 17mm ƒ/3,5 – Fujichrome Velvia 50

Caffenol-C 2 Bath Test
Nikkormat FT2 – Nikon Nikkor 50mm 1:1.8 – Polypan F @ ASA-50 – Caffenol-C 2 Bath 5+5

Firewood (Nikon Version)
Nikkormat FT2 – Nikon Nikkor 50mm 1:1.8 – Polypan F @ ASA-50 – Ilford ID-11 (1+1) 9:00 @ 20C

Nikon Nikkormat FT3 – Released as more of a stop-gap measure, the FT3 is a rare model of Nikkormat that can mount AI-S without needing the claw/pin interface. They were short lived as Nikon released the FM/FE line in 1977 a few months after the FT3 hit shelves.

CCR Review 46 - Nikon Nikkormat FT3

  • Make: Nikon
  • Model: Nikkormat FT3
  • Type: Single Lens Reflex
  • Format: 35mm, 36x24mm
  • Lens: Interchangable, Nikon F
  • Year of Manufacture: 1977

CCR Review 46 - Nikon Nikkormat FT3
Nikon Nikkormat FT3 – AI-S Nikkor 50mm 1:1.4 – Ilford FP4+ @ ASA-100 – Kodak D-23 (Stock) 6:00 @ 20C

CCR Review 46 - Nikon Nikkormat FT3
Nikon Nikkormat FT3 – AI-S Nikkor 50mm 1:1.4 – Ilford FP4+ @ ASA-100 – Kodak D-23 (Stock) 6:00 @ 20C

CCR Review 46 - Nikon Nikkormat FT3
Nikon Nikkormat FT3 – AI-S Nikkor 50mm 1:1.4 – Ilford FP4+ @ ASA-100 – Kodak D-23 (Stock) 6:00 @ 20C

Looking for a good spot to get your gear and material fix…check out Burlington Camera, Downtown Camera, Film Plus, Belle Arte Camera and Camtech, if you’re in the GTA region of Ontario. In Guelph there’s Pond’s FotoSource For those further north you can visit Foto Art Camera in Owen Sound. On the West Coast (British Columbia) check out Beau Photo Supply. Additionally you can order online at Argentix (Quebec), the Film Photography Project or Freestyle Photographic.

Also you can connect with us through email: classiccamerarevivial[at]gmail[dot]com or by Facebook, we’re at Classic Camera Revival or even Twitter @ccamerarevival

CCR Review 59 – Canon FTb

While I have shot only a handful of Canon products during my reviews, they’ve all given positive results in my books. The Canon FTb is not bucking this trend as a solid match needle, mechanical SLR it is certainly a top pick for me as a student camera. Simple in its operation, and yet provides a good solid introduction to 35mm film photography. Special thanks to Bill Smith for loaning out this black beauty!

CCR Review 59 - Canon FTb

The Dirt

  • Make: Canon
  • Model: FTb
  • Type: Single Lens Reflex
  • Format: 135 (35mm), 36×24
  • Len: Interchangeable, Canon FD Mount
  • Year of Manufacture: 1971

CCR Review 59 - Canon FTb

CCR Review 59 - Canon FTb

The Good
The number one thing I love about this camera is the Quick Load function. Often with older cameras it takes a bit of fiddling to get the film loaded up, some cameras are easier than others, and then there’s the Canon Quick Load. It seriously makes it easy like my Nikon F5, lay down the film, close the door, advance fire, advance, fire and you’re ready to rock and roll. Everything else is fairly well laid out and in a normal place. A power switch to save on battery power, a short throw on the film advance and a pleasing weight in hand. And finally, it’s a match needle metering system very similar to my first SLR, the Minolta SRT-102, put the hole over the needle, nice and easy!

CCR Review 59 - Canon FTb

CCR Review 59 - Canon FTb

The Bad
By this point, reader, you will probably realize that there are some cameras that I try hard to find a fault in, and I normally will go for something petty, well the FTb is one such camera. And that fault is, of course, the battery. The camera does need a mercury cell to work, a power source that isn’t exactly easy to find these days. Now there are some alternatives such as an adapter to step down the power out of a current battery or an air-zinc battery. Then again as the FTb is a mechanical camera all the battery powers is the internal meter, so it isn’t that big of a deal.

CCR Review 59 - Canon FTb

The Lowdown
If you don’t want to spend a fortune to get a solid learner camera, then the FTb is certainly for you. With or without a working meter you get the most bang for your buck, and both the camera bodies and lenses are plentiful online and in reputable used camera shops. If I didn’t already have an extensive selection of Nikon cameras and lenses, an FTb would certainly be a welcome addition to my camera bag. So if you don’t like the idea of grabbing a cliche K1000 or FM, then give the FTb another look, it won’t let you down.

All Photos Taken in Guelph, Ontario
Canon FTb – Canon Lens FD 50mm 1:1.8 – ORWO UN54 – Kodak HC-110 Dil. A 7:30 @ 20C

CCR Review 58 – Graflex Pacemaker Crown Graphic

At the very beginning of these review blogs I had laid out some rules, and now I’m going to break one of them and review a large format, sheet film camera. The Crown Graphic is my 4×5 camera of choice these days; it’s reliable camera that can take a hit and keep on taking photos. I mean that is what it’s designed to do, it’s a press camera. And when it comes to large format, I’m glad that my first experiences with the format were on a press camera rather than a field or monorail because I don’t think I would have taken to the format in the same way.

CCR Review 58 - Graflex Pacemaker Crown Graphic

The Dirt

  • Make: Graflex
  • Model: Pacemaker Crown Graphic
  • Type: Press Camera, View/Rangefinder
  • Format: Multiple, Graflok Back (Roll film, or Sheet Film)
  • Len: Interchangeable, Crown Graphic Lens Boards
  • Year of Manufacture: 1955-1973 (This Model, 1968)

CCR Review 58 - Graflex Pacemaker Crown Graphic

CCR Review 58 - Graflex Pacemaker Crown Graphic

The Good
The number one thing I love about the Crown Graphic is that it’s versatile with a single camera I have both a handheld rangefinder based camera that I can just point, focus and shoot, at least when I’m using the Xenar 135mm lens, as I’ve calibrated the rangefinder for the lens. I much prefer to shoot the camera like a field camera, on a tripod, composing and focusing using the ground glass on the back. Using the glass gives me full creative control and use of some fantastic lenses, like the Symmar-S 210mm (which is the lens I use the most). Plus that’s the power of large format, your Crown will be able to use most lenses out there, and all the film holders and the Graflok back means you can attach all sorts of accessories such as roll film magazines and Polaroid Type 100 film holders. And finally, this camera has a nice fast setup, pop the front cover, drop the bed pull out the bellows. And if you’re using ‘pancake’ style lenses, you can keep the lens on the camera when you close the door.

CCR Review 58 - Graflex Pacemaker Crown Graphic

CCR Review 58 - Graflex Pacemaker Crown Graphic

The Bad
Like any large format camera, the biggest detractor to them is the size and the amount of stuff you need to bring to use the camera well. Tripod, multiple film holders, meter, and the lenses all mounted on their boards. It adds up after a while. But for me, it’s worth the effort. Another issue that only large format shooters will note with a press camera is the lack of movements, while the Crown Graphic gives more than the Speed Graphic, you are still only limited to movements on your front standard, and even then you’re relatively limited. But again this was a camera not designed for shooting that requires much in the way of movements. And finally there is starting to be a lack of spare parts for these cameras, so getting bits and pieces replaced or repaired is starting to become a problem, either you can grab ones that are already broken for spare parts or pray that you know someone who can machine the appropriate piece. Thankfully their rugged build means they are designed to last.

CCR Review 58 - Graflex Pacemaker Crown Graphic

CCR Review 58 - Graflex Pacemaker Crown Graphic

The Lowdown
If you’re like me and shoot on a mobile basis, then the press camera is certainly the best option, and often a Crown Graphic kit can be had for an inexpensive out of pocket cost. Being highly adaptable to multiple shooting situations and with a quick setup and tear down it’s a great camera for learning on. Of course, if you’re a technical shooter who needs movements then I would avoid press cameras altogether and go for something a little more expensive. Intrepid, Shen-Hao, Takahara, Linhoff, and Sinar are all excellent options. But for me, I’m sticking to the Crown.

All Photos Taken in Georgetown, Ontario
Graflex Pacemaker Crown Graphic – Schneider-Kreuznach Xenar 1:4,7/135 – Kodak Tri-X Pan @ ASA-200
Pyrocat-HD (1+1+100) 10:00 @ 20C

Classic Camera Revival – Episode 26 – Know When to Fold ‘Em

ccr-logo-leaf

Cameras Featured on Today’s Episode

Agfa Ventura Deluxe – The Agfa Ventura Deluxe is a camera by many names, and while the copy that Alex has produces images closer to that of a toy camera, that is mostly due to age, rather than design. But hey, you can probably get one for a lower price than a Holga these days.

CCR Review 52 - Agfa Ventura Deluxe

  • Make: Agfa Camera Works
  • Model: Ventura Deluxe. Also Known As: Ventura 66 or Isolette II
  • Type: Point & Shoot
  • Format: 120, 6×6
  • Lens: Fixed, Agfa Apotar 1:4,5 f=8,5cm
  • Year of Manufacture: 1952-1955

CCR Review 52 - Agfa Ventura Deluxe
Agfa Ventura Deluxe – Agfa Apotar 1:4,5 f=8,5cm – Kodak Tri-X 400 @ ASA-400 – Kodak D-23 (Stock) 7:30 @ 20C

CCR Review 52 - Agfa Ventura Deluxe
Agfa Ventura Deluxe – Agfa Apotar 1:4,5 f=8,5cm – Kodak Tri-X 400 @ ASA-400 – Kodak D-23 (Stock) 7:30 @ 20C

Ventura Test
Agfa Ventura Deluxe – Agfa Apotar 1:4,5 f=8,5cm – Rollei Superpan 200 @ ASA-200 – Blazinal (1+25) 8:00 @ 20C

Anniversary Speed Graphic (2.25×3.25) – This is Donna’s baby, a beautiful Speed Graphic. Originally designed to take the smaller 2.25 by 3.25 sheets, she usually runs the camera with a 6×9 roll film back, and while you get custom cut Xray film from the FPP, using roll film opens up a lot of possibilities.

Baby Speed Graphic

  • Make: Graflex
  • Model: Anniversary Speed Graphic (2.25×3.25)
  • Type: Press View Camera
  • Format: Multiple: Sheet (2 1/4 x 3 1/4), 120/220 (6×9)
  • Lens: Interchangeable, Anniversary Graphic Board
  • Year of Manufacture: 1940-1946

Great combo!
Baby Speed Graphic – Voigtlander Voigtar 1:6,3 f=10,5cm – Kodak Tri-X 400 @ ASA-800 – Diafine 3+3 @ 20C

Zeiss-Ikon Super-Ikonta 531/2 – Indiana Jones, style, class and a taste for adventure. The 1930s were a great time save the crippling economic depression and Nazis but who needs to worry about those when you have a slick looking camera that can turn heads and take find photos as well, meet the Super-Ikonta.

Classic Camera Revival - Episode 26 - Know When to Fold 'Em

  • Make: Zeiss-Ikon
  • Model: Super-Ikonta 531/2
  • Type: Rangefinder
  • Format: 120, 6×9
  • Lens: Fixed, Novar-Anastigmat 1:3,5 f=10,5cm
  • Year of Manufacture: 1938

CCR Review 42 - Zeiss Ikon Super-Ikonta 53 1/2
Zeiss Ikon Super-Ikonta 53 1/2 – Novar-Anastigmat 1:3,5 f=10,5cm – Kodak Technical Pan (TP) @ ASA-25 – Kodak HC-110 Dil. F 12:00 @ 20C

CCR Review 42 - Zeiss Ikon Super-Ikonta 53 1/2
Zeiss Ikon Super-Ikonta 53 1/2 – Novar-Anastigmat 1:3,5 f=10,5cm – Kodak Technical Pan (TP) @ ASA-25 – Kodak HC-110 Dil. F 12:00 @ 20C

CCR Review 42 - Zeiss Ikon Super-Ikonta 53 1/2
Zeiss Ikon Super-Ikonta 53 1/2 – Novar-Anastigmat 1:3,5 f=10,5cm – Kodak Technical Pan (TP) @ ASA-25 – Kodak HC-110 Dil. F 12:00 @ 20C

Voigtlander Avus – Sadly this camera doesn’t see much use, due to the fact it’s over one hundred years old and that it takes 9×12 plates. While you can adapt a roll film holder to the camera, it’s a costly modification, although the lens might work well on a 4×5.

Classic Camera Revival - Episode 26 - Know When to Fold 'Em

  • Make: Voigtlander
  • Model: Avus
  • Type: View Camera
  • Format: Plate, 9×12
  • Lens: Fixed, Voigtlander Anistigmat Skopar 1:4,5 f=13,5cm
  • Year of Manufacture: 1914-1936

shell
Voigtlander Avus – Voigtlander Anistigmat Skopar 1:4,5 f=13,5cm

Kodak Vigilant Junior Six-20 – This simple folding camera aimed at the consumer market with a simple one-element lens it was probably the vacation stalwart for many families post world war two.

Week #8 - The Kodak Vigilant Junior 620 & Ilford Delta 400

  • Make: Kodak
  • Model: Vigilant Junior Six-20
  • Type: Point & Shoot
  • Format: 620, 6×9
  • Lens: Fixed, Kodak Kodet 105mm ƒ/12.5
  • Year of Manufacture: 1940-1948

Fallen
Kodak Vigilant Junior Six-20 – Kodak Kodet 105mm ƒ/12.5 – Ilford Delta 400 @ ASA-400 – Rodinal (1+50) 20:00 @ 20C

Vigilant Table - Kodak Vigilant Jr. 620 - Ilford Delta 400
Kodak Vigilant Junior Six-20 – Kodak Kodet 105mm ƒ/12.5 – Ilford Delta 400 @ ASA-400 – Rodinal (1+50) 20:00 @ 20C

Looking for a good spot to get your gear and material fix…check out Burlington Camera, Downtown Camera, Film Plus, Belle Arte Camera and Camtech, if you’re in the GTA region of Ontario. In Guelph there’s Pond’s FotoSource For those further north you can visit Foto Art Camera in Owen Sound. On the West Coast (British Columbia) check out Beau Photo Supply. Additionally you can order online at Argentix (Quebec), the Film Photography Project or Freestyle Photographic.

Also you can connect with us through email: classiccamerarevivial[at]gmail[dot]com or by Facebook, we’re at Classic Camera Revival or even Twitter @ccamerarevival