Category Archives: Classic Camera Revival

Show Notes for the Classic Camera Revival Podcast

CCR Review 59 – Canon FTb

While I have shot only a handful of Canon products during my reviews, they’ve all given positive results in my books. The Canon FTb is not bucking this trend as a solid match needle, mechanical SLR it is certainly a top pick for me as a student camera. Simple in its operation, and yet provides a good solid introduction to 35mm film photography. Special thanks to Bill Smith for loaning out this black beauty!

CCR Review 59 - Canon FTb

The Dirt

  • Make: Canon
  • Model: FTb
  • Type: Single Lens Reflex
  • Format: 135 (35mm), 36×24
  • Len: Interchangeable, Canon FD Mount
  • Year of Manufacture: 1971

CCR Review 59 - Canon FTb

CCR Review 59 - Canon FTb

The Good
The number one thing I love about this camera is the Quick Load function. Often with older cameras it takes a bit of fiddling to get the film loaded up, some cameras are easier than others, and then there’s the Canon Quick Load. It seriously makes it easy like my Nikon F5, lay down the film, close the door, advance fire, advance, fire and you’re ready to rock and roll. Everything else is fairly well laid out and in a normal place. A power switch to save on battery power, a short throw on the film advance and a pleasing weight in hand. And finally, it’s a match needle metering system very similar to my first SLR, the Minolta SRT-102, put the hole over the needle, nice and easy!

CCR Review 59 - Canon FTb

CCR Review 59 - Canon FTb

The Bad
By this point, reader, you will probably realize that there are some cameras that I try hard to find a fault in, and I normally will go for something petty, well the FTb is one such camera. And that fault is, of course, the battery. The camera does need a mercury cell to work, a power source that isn’t exactly easy to find these days. Now there are some alternatives such as an adapter to step down the power out of a current battery or an air-zinc battery. Then again as the FTb is a mechanical camera all the battery powers is the internal meter, so it isn’t that big of a deal.

CCR Review 59 - Canon FTb

The Lowdown
If you don’t want to spend a fortune to get a solid learner camera, then the FTb is certainly for you. With or without a working meter you get the most bang for your buck, and both the camera bodies and lenses are plentiful online and in reputable used camera shops. If I didn’t already have an extensive selection of Nikon cameras and lenses, an FTb would certainly be a welcome addition to my camera bag. So if you don’t like the idea of grabbing a cliche K1000 or FM, then give the FTb another look, it won’t let you down.

All Photos Taken in Guelph, Ontario
Canon FTb – Canon Lens FD 50mm 1:1.8 – ORWO UN54 – Kodak HC-110 Dil. A 7:30 @ 20C

CCR Review 58 – Graflex Pacemaker Crown Graphic

At the very beginning of these review blogs I had laid out some rules, and now I’m going to break one of them and review a large format, sheet film camera. The Crown Graphic is my 4×5 camera of choice these days; it’s reliable camera that can take a hit and keep on taking photos. I mean that is what it’s designed to do, it’s a press camera. And when it comes to large format, I’m glad that my first experiences with the format were on a press camera rather than a field or monorail because I don’t think I would have taken to the format in the same way.

CCR Review 58 - Graflex Pacemaker Crown Graphic

The Dirt

  • Make: Graflex
  • Model: Pacemaker Crown Graphic
  • Type: Press Camera, View/Rangefinder
  • Format: Multiple, Graflok Back (Roll film, or Sheet Film)
  • Len: Interchangeable, Crown Graphic Lens Boards
  • Year of Manufacture: 1955-1973 (This Model, 1968)

CCR Review 58 - Graflex Pacemaker Crown Graphic

CCR Review 58 - Graflex Pacemaker Crown Graphic

The Good
The number one thing I love about the Crown Graphic is that it’s versatile with a single camera I have both a handheld rangefinder based camera that I can just point, focus and shoot, at least when I’m using the Xenar 135mm lens, as I’ve calibrated the rangefinder for the lens. I much prefer to shoot the camera like a field camera, on a tripod, composing and focusing using the ground glass on the back. Using the glass gives me full creative control and use of some fantastic lenses, like the Symmar-S 210mm (which is the lens I use the most). Plus that’s the power of large format, your Crown will be able to use most lenses out there, and all the film holders and the Graflok back means you can attach all sorts of accessories such as roll film magazines and Polaroid Type 100 film holders. And finally, this camera has a nice fast setup, pop the front cover, drop the bed pull out the bellows. And if you’re using ‘pancake’ style lenses, you can keep the lens on the camera when you close the door.

CCR Review 58 - Graflex Pacemaker Crown Graphic

CCR Review 58 - Graflex Pacemaker Crown Graphic

The Bad
Like any large format camera, the biggest detractor to them is the size and the amount of stuff you need to bring to use the camera well. Tripod, multiple film holders, meter, and the lenses all mounted on their boards. It adds up after a while. But for me, it’s worth the effort. Another issue that only large format shooters will note with a press camera is the lack of movements, while the Crown Graphic gives more than the Speed Graphic, you are still only limited to movements on your front standard, and even then you’re relatively limited. But again this was a camera not designed for shooting that requires much in the way of movements. And finally there is starting to be a lack of spare parts for these cameras, so getting bits and pieces replaced or repaired is starting to become a problem, either you can grab ones that are already broken for spare parts or pray that you know someone who can machine the appropriate piece. Thankfully their rugged build means they are designed to last.

CCR Review 58 - Graflex Pacemaker Crown Graphic

CCR Review 58 - Graflex Pacemaker Crown Graphic

The Lowdown
If you’re like me and shoot on a mobile basis, then the press camera is certainly the best option, and often a Crown Graphic kit can be had for an inexpensive out of pocket cost. Being highly adaptable to multiple shooting situations and with a quick setup and tear down it’s a great camera for learning on. Of course, if you’re a technical shooter who needs movements then I would avoid press cameras altogether and go for something a little more expensive. Intrepid, Shen-Hao, Takahara, Linhoff, and Sinar are all excellent options. But for me, I’m sticking to the Crown.

All Photos Taken in Georgetown, Ontario
Graflex Pacemaker Crown Graphic – Schneider-Kreuznach Xenar 1:4,7/135 – Kodak Tri-X Pan @ ASA-200
Pyrocat-HD (1+1+100) 10:00 @ 20C

Classic Camera Revival – Episode 26 – Know When to Fold ‘Em

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Cameras Featured on Today’s Episode

Agfa Ventura Deluxe – The Agfa Ventura Deluxe is a camera by many names, and while the copy that Alex has produces images closer to that of a toy camera, that is mostly due to age, rather than design. But hey, you can probably get one for a lower price than a Holga these days.

CCR Review 52 - Agfa Ventura Deluxe

  • Make: Agfa Camera Works
  • Model: Ventura Deluxe. Also Known As: Ventura 66 or Isolette II
  • Type: Point & Shoot
  • Format: 120, 6×6
  • Lens: Fixed, Agfa Apotar 1:4,5 f=8,5cm
  • Year of Manufacture: 1952-1955

CCR Review 52 - Agfa Ventura Deluxe
Agfa Ventura Deluxe – Agfa Apotar 1:4,5 f=8,5cm – Kodak Tri-X 400 @ ASA-400 – Kodak D-23 (Stock) 7:30 @ 20C

CCR Review 52 - Agfa Ventura Deluxe
Agfa Ventura Deluxe – Agfa Apotar 1:4,5 f=8,5cm – Kodak Tri-X 400 @ ASA-400 – Kodak D-23 (Stock) 7:30 @ 20C

Ventura Test
Agfa Ventura Deluxe – Agfa Apotar 1:4,5 f=8,5cm – Rollei Superpan 200 @ ASA-200 – Blazinal (1+25) 8:00 @ 20C

Anniversary Speed Graphic (2.25×3.25) – This is Donna’s baby, a beautiful Speed Graphic. Originally designed to take the smaller 2.25 by 3.25 sheets, she usually runs the camera with a 6×9 roll film back, and while you get custom cut Xray film from the FPP, using roll film opens up a lot of possibilities.

Baby Speed Graphic

  • Make: Graflex
  • Model: Anniversary Speed Graphic (2.25×3.25)
  • Type: Press View Camera
  • Format: Multiple: Sheet (2 1/4 x 3 1/4), 120/220 (6×9)
  • Lens: Interchangeable, Anniversary Graphic Board
  • Year of Manufacture: 1940-1946

Great combo!
Baby Speed Graphic – Voigtlander Voigtar 1:6,3 f=10,5cm – Kodak Tri-X 400 @ ASA-800 – Diafine 3+3 @ 20C

Zeiss-Ikon Super-Ikonta 531/2 – Indiana Jones, style, class and a taste for adventure. The 1930s were a great time save the crippling economic depression and Nazis but who needs to worry about those when you have a slick looking camera that can turn heads and take find photos as well, meet the Super-Ikonta.

Classic Camera Revival - Episode 26 - Know When to Fold 'Em

  • Make: Zeiss-Ikon
  • Model: Super-Ikonta 531/2
  • Type: Rangefinder
  • Format: 120, 6×9
  • Lens: Fixed, Novar-Anastigmat 1:3,5 f=10,5cm
  • Year of Manufacture: 1938

CCR Review 42 - Zeiss Ikon Super-Ikonta 53 1/2
Zeiss Ikon Super-Ikonta 53 1/2 – Novar-Anastigmat 1:3,5 f=10,5cm – Kodak Technical Pan (TP) @ ASA-25 – Kodak HC-110 Dil. F 12:00 @ 20C

CCR Review 42 - Zeiss Ikon Super-Ikonta 53 1/2
Zeiss Ikon Super-Ikonta 53 1/2 – Novar-Anastigmat 1:3,5 f=10,5cm – Kodak Technical Pan (TP) @ ASA-25 – Kodak HC-110 Dil. F 12:00 @ 20C

CCR Review 42 - Zeiss Ikon Super-Ikonta 53 1/2
Zeiss Ikon Super-Ikonta 53 1/2 – Novar-Anastigmat 1:3,5 f=10,5cm – Kodak Technical Pan (TP) @ ASA-25 – Kodak HC-110 Dil. F 12:00 @ 20C

Voigtlander Avus – Sadly this camera doesn’t see much use, due to the fact it’s over one hundred years old and that it takes 9×12 plates. While you can adapt a roll film holder to the camera, it’s a costly modification, although the lens might work well on a 4×5.

Classic Camera Revival - Episode 26 - Know When to Fold 'Em

  • Make: Voigtlander
  • Model: Avus
  • Type: View Camera
  • Format: Plate, 9×12
  • Lens: Fixed, Voigtlander Anistigmat Skopar 1:4,5 f=13,5cm
  • Year of Manufacture: 1914-1936

shell
Voigtlander Avus – Voigtlander Anistigmat Skopar 1:4,5 f=13,5cm

Kodak Vigilant Junior Six-20 – This simple folding camera aimed at the consumer market with a simple one-element lens it was probably the vacation stalwart for many families post world war two.

Week #8 - The Kodak Vigilant Junior 620 & Ilford Delta 400

  • Make: Kodak
  • Model: Vigilant Junior Six-20
  • Type: Point & Shoot
  • Format: 620, 6×9
  • Lens: Fixed, Kodak Kodet 105mm ƒ/12.5
  • Year of Manufacture: 1940-1948

Fallen
Kodak Vigilant Junior Six-20 – Kodak Kodet 105mm ƒ/12.5 – Ilford Delta 400 @ ASA-400 – Rodinal (1+50) 20:00 @ 20C

Vigilant Table - Kodak Vigilant Jr. 620 - Ilford Delta 400
Kodak Vigilant Junior Six-20 – Kodak Kodet 105mm ƒ/12.5 – Ilford Delta 400 @ ASA-400 – Rodinal (1+50) 20:00 @ 20C

Looking for a good spot to get your gear and material fix…check out Burlington Camera, Downtown Camera, Film Plus, Belle Arte Camera and Camtech, if you’re in the GTA region of Ontario. In Guelph there’s Pond’s FotoSource For those further north you can visit Foto Art Camera in Owen Sound. On the West Coast (British Columbia) check out Beau Photo Supply. Additionally you can order online at Argentix (Quebec), the Film Photography Project or Freestyle Photographic.

Also you can connect with us through email: classiccamerarevivial[at]gmail[dot]com or by Facebook, we’re at Classic Camera Revival or even Twitter @ccamerarevival

CCR Review 57 – Zeiss Ikon Contaflex Super (Old)

If you think that you’ve seen this camera reviewed before, you’re right, in a certain way. I have written about the newer version of this camera, the Contaflex Super B before. Despite this, I figured it would be good to compare it to the battery-less version of the Contaflex. Despite the troubles I mentioned in the Super B review, the Super remains a strong camera and one I would take over the Super B any day. Special thanks to James Lee for loaning out this beauty for review.

CCR Review 57 - Zeiss Ikon Contaflex Super (Old)

The Dirt

  • Make: Zeiss Ikon
  • Model: Contaflex Super
  • Type: Single Lens Reflex
  • Format: 135 (35mm), 36x24mm
  • Len: Interchangeable, Breach lock
  • Year of Manufacture: 1958/li>

CCR Review 57 - Zeiss Ikon Contaflex Super (Old)

CCR Review 57 - Zeiss Ikon Contaflex Super (Old)

The Good
The Contaflex Super is a strong camera right out of the box. Like the Super B, the camera body is bulky and has a trapezoidal shape which makes it easy to hold for extended periods of time, as you’re not just carrying a box. Then there’s the meter, selenium based so if you have one in good shape you don’t need a battery to get a good exposure. And you have a wonderful easy to read match needle right in your viewfinder. But one thing that I feel sets the Super apart from its battery-powered counterpart is the aperture dial on the camera body. This dial made shooting the camera easy because you just have to spin the dial to make sure the needle is in the notch! Add this that all the controls from the aperture dial to the focusing and shutter speed are well laid out making it a very comfortable camera to use.

CCR Review 57 - Zeiss Ikon Contaflex Super (Old)

CCR Review 57 - Zeiss Ikon Contaflex Super (Old)

The Bad
Like the Super B, my biggest issue with this camera is that it lacks automatic mirror return. The result is a heavier than normal film advance as it both cocks the shutter, advances the film, and returns the mirror. The second issue is setting the film speed, you need to know DIN, thankfully most film boxes do have that number on it so that it won’t be much of an issue, but you still have to think a little different. And finally there’s the loading of the film, I never got the hang of loading up the film by removing the entire back, it does slow down the use of this camera. I have to remember that the Super came into being in the days when photography was still a luxury, so one-handed loading was not something manufacturers thought would be an issue.

CCR Review 57 - Zeiss Ikon Contaflex Super (Old)

CCR Review 57 - Zeiss Ikon Contaflex Super (Old)

The Lowdown
The Contaflex Super is certainly a better option than the Super B. Not needing a battery, full mechanical operations, and that wonderful aperture dial just makes it that much better. Of course being a selenium powered meter, you can run across the Super with a non-functioning meter, but you shouldn’t let that stop you as there’s plenty of options for checking your exposure.

CCR Review 57 - Zeiss Ikon Contaflex Super (Old)

A little side notes about the film. I’ve used Kentmere 100 on a couple of occasions before this and have never liked the results. However, this time I enjoyed my results, I guess the developer of choice for Kentmere 100 is now HC-110 Dilution B, but following a different agitation pattern than I normally do, first 30 seconds of constant agitation then 5 seconds every 30 seconds following.

All Photos Taken in Bellfountain, Ontario
Zeiss Ikon Contaflex Super – Carl Zeiss Tessar 50/2,8 – Kentmere @ ASA-100 – Kodak HC-110 Dil. B 5:45 @ 20C

CCR Review 56 – Leica R3

It’s the red dot special, but not the red dot you were probably expecting. While Leica is best known for their rangefinder cameras, both the older Barnack and the iconic M-Series Leica produces a line of single lens reflex cameras in response to the cameras coming out of Japan. While the early cameras were strictly manufactured by Leica, by the mid-1970s, they had teamed up with Minolta. The agreement produced the Leica CL/Minolta CLE both rangefinder cameras, and the Leica R3/Minolta XE! The first time I picked up this camera, having never used a Leica SLR before I was hoping for something special, but I soon found out there’s a reason these cameras aren’t that popular. Special thanks to James Lee for loaning out this beauty for review.

CCR Review 56 - Leica R3

The Dirt

  • Make: Leica Camera AG
  • Model: R3
  • Type: Single Lens Reflex
  • Format: 135 (35mm), 36x24mm
  • Len: Interchangeable, Leica R-Mount
  • Year of Manufacture: 1976-1979

CCR Review 56 - Leica R3

CCR Review 56 - Leica R3

The Good
There are two good points about the R3, first and foremost it’s a tank, but it’s a tank with balance, it just feels right to shoot, short throw on the film advance, and all the knobs and that thrice-damned stop down lever. The viewfinder is big and bright, and the needle-on-shutter-speed metering system is clear and visible. And of course, there’s the optical quality which is what we’ve come to expect from Leica. And this is despite the lenses being much larger than their M-Mount cousins.

CCR Review 56 - Leica R3

CCR Review 56 - Leica R3

The Bad
The R3 is not an easy camera to operate; it took me about three rolls of film to finally get the hang of it. And it all has to come down to how the camera meters. Despite having a decent TTL meter, you need to manually stop down the lens to get it to pick up on the correct shutter speed, then half-press the shutter button, release the lever then press the shutter release down the rest of the way. I gave up by the third roll and switched to metering with my Gossen Lunasix F and running the camera in full manual. And finally there’s the weight, this is a well-balanced camera, but heavy. It’s not one that I would enjoy carrying around all day and shooting with, especially with the 135mm lens on mounted, even the shorter 50mm is still a pain.

CCR Review 56 - Leica R3

CCR Review 56 - Leica R3

The Lowdown
The R3 is not a Minolta, it may be Minolta on the inside, but it certainly isn’t on the outside. And while you can purchase the bodies for a reasonable price, don’t expect the lenses to be on the inexpensive side. The R3 is not a camera for the beginner, or for someone who is unfamiliar with the operation of Leica SLRs, there’s a steep learning curve, and it takes away from the decent “feel” of the camera. Despite the image quality and certain cache that comes with shooting a Leica, my honest opinion, do yourself a favour and get a Minolta XE-7. You’ll get an easier camera to operate, with comparable optics and you won’t break the bank building a lens system.

All Photos Taken in Oakville, Ontario
Leica R3 Electronic – Leitz Canada Elmarit-R 1:2.8/135 – Kodak Tri-X 400 @ ASA-400 – Kodak D-23 (Stock) 7:30 @ 20C

CCR Review 55 – Shanghai Camera Seagull 4A-103

Most of my experiences with communist built cameras have been gear from the failed Soviet Bloc, which is all well and good, but those cameras were not exactly known for their quality control, offset by the ease of repair by the layperson. However, there is still another communist state still producing cameras even today, and that’s China. The Shanghai Camera Factory started production of their Seagull 4A line in 1968, and by the 1970s the Seagull 4A-103 came into being. At first glance, you’d probably think that the camera in question is a German Rolleicord and you would be partially right. The 4A-103 is a direct copy of the Franke & Heidecke Rolleicord. But the Seagull is not a Rolleicord, not by a longshot. A big thanks to Donna Bitaxi for loaning out this camera for a review!

CCR Review 56 - Seagull 4A-103

The Dirt

  • Make: Shanghai Camera Factory
  • Model: Seagull 4A-103
  • Type: Twin Lens Reflex
  • Format: Medium (120), 6cm x 6cm
  • Len: Fixed, Haiou SA-85 1:3.5/75
  • Year of Manufacture: 1970s

CCR Review 55 - Seagull 4A-103

CCR Review 55 - Seagull 4A-103

The Good
As lower-grade TLRs go, the Seagull has a lot going for it. First off the viewing screen is bright thanks to a full f/2.8 viewing lens, shame they couldn’t put the same lens on the taking side as well. The exposure controls are easy to operate and are close at hand. Film loading is easy and pretty fast, but it based on cranks rather than an internal mechanism so that it can seem a bit weird at first. This feeling could very well just be my personal stance having never shot a Rolleicord. The optics on the camera are surprisingly decent, with no sign of any vignetting, or poor quality.

CCR Review 55 - Seagull 4A-103

CCR Review 55 - Seagull 4A-103

The Bad
Despite the metal construction, this camera feels flimsy, and not in it’s a light-weight camera sort of way just doesn’t feel as stable as I would expect from such a camera. The most trouble I have is the film door, while it is light tight, the locking wheel just spins, not sure why. The exposure controls while easy to access can be a bit stiff. The first time I took the camera out was in the cold weather, and they tended to complain a little. And continuing on the cold weather topic, the shutter seemed to freeze resulting in a blank roll of film first time around. It also could be due to age combined with the cold. However, when I tested it out a second time, the shutter did fire. I was also indoors. Now, before I continue, let’s talk focus. I honestly don’t know what happened here; everything was in focus when I was looking through the ground glass, even using the loupe. And when I pulled the negatives from the tank there were some obvious out of focus ones or shaky. But every single image is soft and out of focus, and I’m not sure what caused it!

CCR Review 55 - Seagull 4A-103

CCR Review 55 - Seagull 4A-103

The Lowdown
In general, this isn’t a bad camera, some good things are going for it, but sadly in the 4A-103 the bad in this case outweigh them. The number one issue is the focus; it could be caused by the back not closing properly, so the film wasn’t aligned properly. Then there was the issue of the shutter; it was completely frozen when out in the cold, and even inside is stuck open at the 1/2 second mark. Of course, that can be solved with a clean, lube, and adjust. So while I really cannot recommend the 4A-103, I certainly would suggest a newer model which you can still purchase new!

All Photos Taken at Sheridan College, Oakville, Ontario, Canada
Seagull 4A-103 – Haiou SA-85 1:3.5/75 – Ilford Pan F+ @ ASA-50 – Blazinal (1+25) 6:00 @ 20C

Classic Camera Revival – Episode 25 – The Minolta Warriors

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Cameras Featured on Today’s Episode

Minolta SRT-102 – This mechanical beast is an all mechanical, match-needle SLR. It has all the same features as the SRT-101 but what sets it apart is a hot shoe for a standard flash. From the viewfinder, you have both your aperture and shutter speed displayed which helps with setting the exposure without loosing the scene. Through the rest of the world, the camera is known as the SRT Super or SRT-303.

Classic Camera Revival - Episode 25 - The Minolta Warriors

  • Make: Minolta
  • Model: SRT-102
  • Type: Single Lens Reflex
  • Format: 35mm, 36x24mm
  • Lens: Interchangeable, Minolta MD
  • Year of Manufacture: 1973

Evening Dog Walk
Minolta SRT-102 – MC Rokkor-PG 50mm 1:1.5 – Fomapan 200 – Kodak Xtol (1+1) 8:30 @ 20C

Goof
Minolta SRT-102 – MC Rokkor-PG 50mm 1:1.5 – Ilford HP5+ – Kodak HC-110 Dil. B 5:00 @ 20C

Weekend Retreat
Minolta SRT-102 – MC Rokkor-PG 50mm 1:1.5 – ORWO UN54 – Kodak Xtol (1+1) 8:00 @ 20C

Minolta XE-5 – A less advanced version of the Minolta XE-7 (or XE/XE-1), this metering is either full manual or aperture priority. The camera does require a battery to function but there is a manual override that has a fixed shutter speed. It was not sold in Japan.

Minolta XE-5

  • Make: Minolta
  • Model: XE-5
  • Type: Single Lens Reflex
  • Format: 35mm, 36x24mm
  • Lens: Interchangeable, Minolta MD
  • Year of Manufacture: 1975

Never Gets Old
Minolta XE-5 – Minolta Rokkor PF 58mm ƒ/1.4 – Fujichrome Sensia 100

Lakeside View
Minolta XE-5 – Minolta Rokkor PF 58mm ƒ/1.4 – Fujichrome Sensia 100

Beach Log
Minolta XE-5 – Minolta Rokkor PF 58mm ƒ/1.4 – Fujichrome Sensia 100

Minolta Maxxum 700si – Taking a huge jump into the 90s the Maxxum 700si is a solid and accessible choice for getting into film photography. It takes readily available 35mm film, it’s entirely automated, cheap, easy to use, and with the Minolta A-Mount if you use the Sony line of Alpha digital SLRs, your full-frame lenses couple perfectly with the camera.

Classic Camera Revival - Episode 25 - The Minolta Warriors

  • Make: Minolta
  • Model: Maxxum 700si
  • Type: Single Lens Reflex
  • Format: 35mm, 36x24mm
  • Lens: Interchangeable, Minolta A-Mount
  • Year of Manufacture: 1993

Toronto - November 2016
Minolta Maxxum 700si – AF Maxxum 35-70mm 1:4 – Kodak Panatomic-X @ ASA-32 – Blazinal (1+50) 10:00 @ 20C

Toronto - November 2016
Minolta Maxxum 700si – AF Maxxum 35-70mm 1:4 – Kodak Panatomic-X @ ASA-32 – Blazinal (1+50) 10:00 @ 20C

Toronto - November 2016
Minolta Maxxum 700si – AF Maxxum 35-70mm 1:4 – Kodak Panatomic-X @ ASA-32 – Blazinal (1+50) 10:00 @ 20C

The FP4Party!back in August of 2016 and it’s been gaining some traction on Twitter, even Ilford is loving this! And yes, we at CCR are big fans of FP4+! So if you want to follow along and join in the fun, you can follow the twitter feed at #FP4party.

Project:1812 - Battle of the Chateauguay
Hasselblad 500c – Carl Zeiss Planar 80mm 1:2.8 – Ilford FP4+ @ ASA-100 – Kodak D-23 (Stock) 6:00 @ 20C

Waiting for the Streecar
Rolleiflex 3.5E3 – Schneider-Kruzenack Xenotar 75mm/3.5 – Ilford FP4+ – Rodinal (1+50) 14:00 @ 20C

Sherman Falls 2011
Rolleiflex 3.5E – Schneider-Kruzenack Xenotar 75mm/3.5 – Ilford FP4+ – Kodak HC-110 Dil. B 7:00 @ 20C

Seneca Behind The Bush
Kodak Brownie Hawkeye Flash – Kodak Meniscus Lens f=75mm f/14.5 – Ilford FP4+ – Ilford Ilfosol 3 (1+14) 7:30 @ 20C

Yes, that’s right, at the Consumer Electronics Show at the beginning of this month Kodak Alaris announced they would be releasing a new version of Ektachrome E100! The new film is due to be released in Q4 of this year! The film is not a return of dead stock but a fresh new version. We at CCR are looking forward to getting our hands on the material and should have an in-depth review of the material in either December or January next year!

Downtown Bristol VA/TN
Downtown Bristol VA/TN – Co-Host Alex had a chance to eat here back in March of last year as was rather impressed with the food!
Pentax 645 – SMC Pentax A 645 35mm 1:3.5 – Kodak Ektachrome E100VS – Processing By: Old School Photo Lab

Looking for a good spot to get your gear and material fix…check out Burlington Camera, Downtown Camera, Film Plus, Belle Arte Camera and Camtech, if you’re in the GTA region of Ontario. In Guelph there’s Pond’s FotoSource For those further north you can visit Foto Art Camera in Owen Sound. On the West Coast (British Columbia) check out Beau Photo Supply. Additionally you can order online at Argentix (Quebec), the Film Photography Project or Freestyle Photographic.

Also you can connect with us through email: classiccamerarevivial[at]gmail[dot]com or by Facebook, we’re at Classic Camera Revival or even Twitter @ccamerarevival

CCR Review 54 – Zenza Bronica ETRS

I have a love/hate relationship with Bronica cameras. If you listen to the Classic Camera Revival Podcast, I railed against the Bronica SQ-Am in episode 22, and I gave away my SQ-Ai because of ergonomic issues I had with the camera. But putting all that aside I went into shooting the ETRS with an open mind and discovered a rather fun camera. When it comes to 645 cameras, the ETRS is the real underdog while the Mamiya m645 and to a lesser extent the Pentax 645 get most of the glory. Which to people looking to crack into medium format the ETR line of cameras offers you the most bang for your buck if you’re just getting started. Big thanks to Mike Bitaxi for loaning out this beauty for review.

CCR Review 55 - Zenza Bronica ETRS

The Dirt

  • Make: Zenza Bronica
  • Model: ETRS
  • Type: Single Lens Reflex
  • Format: Multiple (Back Dependent), 6cm x 4.5cm
  • Lens: Interchangable, Bronica ETR Mount
  • Year of Manufacture: 1979

CCR Review 55 - Zenza Bronica ETRS

CCR Review 55 - Zenza Bronica ETRS

The Good
The strongest aspect of this camera is that it is a system camera, you can change, adapt, and modify the camera into whatever configuration is most comfortable for you and your shooting style. Another plus to it being a system camera if a part breaks, you just have to buy that one section and put all your parts back on it. The configuration I was shooting in was one that was most familiar to me, with an eye-level finder and grip. Of course, the camera operates just as well with no grip and a waist level finder if you’re used to shooting with the SQ-A or Hasselblad cameras. And for volume shooting the camera is great, you get 15 shots per roll, and interchangeable magazines allow you to load up a handful of magazines in the morning and go out shooting without needing to sit down and reload after each roll. And don’t sneeze at the optical quality either the ETR line of lenses are beautiful. Combine all these with being an often unnoticed camera line means you can build up a decent kit without having to break the bank.

CCR Review 55 - Zenza Bronica ETRS

CCR Review 55 - Zenza Bronica ETRS

The Bad
The trouble with being an underdog system is getting the system repaired. When Roger (may he rest in peace) was operating his storefront in Hamilton, you couldn’t even darken his doorstep with a Bronica. These cameras are hard to get fixed and do rely on electronics to operate and battery power. At least in the case of the ETRS the battery door is better designed that the SQ line of cameras, but the battery is not a common one. Best bet is to carry some spares if you’re out on a big trip in an area where there aren’t any specialty stores.

CCR Review 55 - Zenza Bronica ETRS

CCR Review 55 - Zenza Bronica ETRS

The Lowdown
While Bronica does not remain my first choice overall, I can see the draw of the ETR line of cameras. These are inexpensive cameras and if all you want is to shoot in the 6×4.5 format go for it. Just make sure like any electronic based vintage camera that you know it works before you pay for it. Just know that with the ETR line you will be stuck with the 6×4.5 format, if you want more image versatility, pick up an SQ-A body. You get the same quality of optics, and with appropriate backs, you can shoot 6×6 and 6×4.5 with ease. If you do go with the ETR line of cameras, make sure that you get a kit that is setup the way you like it. System cameras are unique creatures, they are amazing with no grip and a waist level finder or eye-level finder and a grip, but start swapping stuff out and you’ll run into ergonomic problems.

All Photos taken in Downtown Milton, Ontario, Canada
Zenza Bronica ETRS – Zenanon-PE 1:2.8 f=75mm – Kodak TMax 100 @ ASA-100 – Kodak D-23 (stock) 9:30 @ 20C

CCR Review 54 – Minolta Maxxum 5000

Sometimes a camera sings, sometimes a camera just sucks, and then there’s the Maxxum 5000. It’s a meh camera, K-Car of cameras, the Maxxum 5000 isn’t the bell of the ball, and it is a little meh on the handling, but for basic, no-nonsense SLR photography, the 5000 is a cheap option with an A-Mount. Let me explain a little bit more. Some cameras are amazing that they grab your attention as soon as you pick it up, for me that would be the Nikon F2, F3, and F5. Also the Rolleiflex 2.8F and several other cameras. Others are so downright terrible that you want to light them on fire. The Maxxum 5000 is one that you know it’ll take pictures; it’ll take decent pictures with good lenses, but it doesn’t excite you. Just like a K-Car, it’ll get you from point a to point b without hassle, but it won’t be an exciting ride.

CCR Review 53 - Minolta Maxxum 5000

The Dirt
Make: Minolta
Model: Maxxum 5000
Type: Single Lens Reflex
Format: 135, 35x24mm
Lens: Interchangeable, Minolta A-Mount
Year of Manufacture: 1986

CCR Review 53 - Minolta Maxxum 5000

CCR Review 53 - Minolta Maxxum 5000

The Good
I’ve been sitting and stewing over what to write about this camera for its good features, and it’s hard with a camera that is just ‘meh’ there’s nothing wrong about the camera. It’s a cheap option to get into film photography if you have some A-Mount full-frame lenses for a digital camera, a nice easy way to learn without going into a fully featured camera that could cost more. The camera’s meter is accurate; controls are easily accessible and straightforward to identify as there isn’t much in the way of using it. The camera is powered by four AAA batteries so you can easily power the camera even in the middle of nowhere.

CCR Review 53 - Minolta Maxxum 5000

CCR Review 53 - Minolta Maxxum 5000

The Bad
The Maxxum 5000 isn’t an impressive camera, it looks and feels like a VCR from the 1980s, the first stumbling steps if you catch my drift. Sure it’ll take good photos with a good lens attached, but you won’t have to do any thinking beside composition. There are no options besides Program and Manual, and the manual control is difficult to operate. The Autofocus is slow and not very accurate I would often have to wait for the camera to lock onto where I wanted it to focus.

CCR Review 53 - Minolta Maxxum 5000

CCR Review 53 - Minolta Maxxum 5000

The Lowdown
Nope, Nope, Nope. I would not recommend this camera really to anyone, while a cheap way to get into film photography there are much better options out there. Yes, the 5000 will get you there, it’s not a camera I would choose. Look at the Maxxum 7000 or even the odd duck 9000 to get rolling into Minolta Autofocus cameras. The 5000 is a cheap camera, but I would recommend an inexpensive one.

All Photos Taken in Oakville, Ontario
Minolta Maxxum 5000 – Maxxum AF 35-70mm 1:4 – Kodak TMax 100 @ ASA-64 – Pyrocat-HD (1+1+100) 9:00 @ 20C

Classic Camera Revival – Episode 24 – Something New

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So we’ve come to the end of another year and another season of the Classic Camera Revival Podcast! So why not look back at the year that was and check out what new things the gang has discovered!

Cameras Featured on Today’s Episode…

Zeiss Ikon Contaflex Super B – While not a new camera for Mike, what’s new for him is finding a Working example of this fine SLR from Cold War Germany! With Carl Zeiss Optics and Semi-Automatic Exposure it’s a great little camera that feels good in the hand.

CCR Review 48 - Zeiss Ikon Contaflex Super B

The Dirt

  • Make: Zeiss Ikon
  • Model: Contaflex Super B
  • Type: Single Lens Reflex
  • Format: 135, 35x24mm
  • Year of Manufacture: 1963

Tasty Treats
Zeiss Ikon Contaflex Super B – Carl Zeiss Tessar 35mm ƒ/3.2 – Fujifilm Reala 100

Missing A Bar
Contaflex Super B – Carl Zeiss Tessar 50mm ƒ/2.8 – Fujicolor 100 @ ASA-50

Positioning
Zeiss Ikon Contaflex Super B – Carl Zeiss Tessar 50mm ƒ/2.8 – Fuji NPS160

Cambo Legend 8×10 – Donna’s trip to the large side saw her pick up a wonderful 8×10 monorail, easy to use and a cheap way to get started on the very expensive side of large format photography!

The Dirt

  • Make: Cambo
  • Model: Legend
  • Type: View Camera, Monorail
  • Format: Sheet, 8×10
  • Year of Manufacture: 1990s

Film Featured on Today’s Episode…

Japan Camera Hunter Streetpan 400 – A brand new, redeveloped film stock from Bellamy, the gentleman behind the popular Japan Camera Hunter site and supplier of rare and odd cameras to the North American market from Japan. He decided to bring back a reformulated version of an Agfa Surveillance film. Remember, it’s not dead stock, it’s fresh! You can buy it directly from Japan Camera Hunter at his site, or pick up a roll or two from Downtown Camera in Toronto, Ontario!

TFSM - Summer '16
Nikon F5 – AF DC-Nikkor 105mm 1:2D – Japan Camera Hunter Streetpan 400 @ ASA-400 – Kodak HC-110 Dil. B 5:00 @ @ 20C

TFSM - Fall '16
Nikon F5 – AF DC-Nikkor 105mm 1:2D – JCH Streetpan 400 @ ASA-400 – Ilford Perceptol (1+1) 10:00 @ 20C

Ending the Day
Nikon F5 – AF-S Nikkor 14-24mm 1:2.8G – JCH Streetpan 400 @ ASA-400 – Ilford Ilfosol 3 (1+3) 5:00 @ 20C

ORWO UN54+ – Another old/new discovery. ORWO is another film from the former Soviet Block that has continued being manufactured. There are two flavours that have made it to the North American Market, an ASA-100 UN54 and ASA-400 N74. These are wonderful films and can be purchased through ORWO North America.

Getting Ready at the Rink
Nikkormat FT2 – AI-S Nikkor 105mm 1:2.5 – Orwo UN54 @ ASA-100 – Rodinal (1+100) 60:00 (Semi-Stand)

Texting and Walking
Nikkormat FT2 – AI-S Nikkor 105mm 1:2.5 – Orwo UN54 @ ASA-100 – Rodinal (1+100) 60:00 (Semi-Stand)

CCR Review 50 - Olympus OM-1
Olympus OM-1 – Olympus F.Zuiko 1:1.8 f=50mm – ORWO UN54+ @ ASA-100 – Kodak HC-110 Dil. A 7:30 @ 20C

CCR Review 48 - Zeiss Ikon Contaflex Super B
Zeiss Ikon Contaflex Super B – Carl Zeiss Tessar 2,8/50 – ORWO UN54+ @ ASA-100 – Kodak Xtol (1+1) 8:00 @ 20C

Developers Featured on Today’s Episode…

Kodak D-23 – An old developer in the photographic world, but a new one from Alex. He discovered it after looking at developers that he hadn’t tried and could be easily made. He was pretty impressed with the first roll he pulled! You can pick up a kit from Photographer’s Formulary!

Project:1812 - The Forts of Prairie Du Chien
Hasselblad 500c – Carl Zeiss Planar 80mm 1:2.8 – Ilford FP4+ @ ASA-100 – Kodak D-23 (Stock) 6:00 @ 20C

Munsing Falls
Hasselblad 500c – Carl Zeiss Planar 80mm 1:2.8 – Ilford Pan F+ @ ASA-50 – Kodak D-23 (1+1) 8:30 @ 20C

Project:1812 - The Battle of Baltimore
Hasselblad 500c – Carl Zeiss Planar 80mm 1:2.8 – Kodak Tri-X 400 @ ASA-400 – Kodak D-23 (Stock) 7:30 @ 20C

Fine Art Photo Supply FA-1027 – FA-1027 came across Alex’s Radar after hearing it mentioned on an episode of the Film Photography project and after hearing it described he wanted to give it a shot. This is a liquid developer that seems to give good results in most films developed in it. Good tone, fine grain! You can pick it up through the Photographer’s Formulary!

52:500c - Week 26 - Close to Home
Hasselblad 500c – Carl Zeiss Planar 80mm 1:2.8 – Rollei RPX 100 @ ASA-100 – FA-1027 (1+14) 9:30 @ 20C

Astrolab
Nikon F5 – AF DC-Nikkor 105mm 1:2D – Ilford Delta 100 @ ASA-100 – FA-1027 (1+14) 9:00 @ 20C

CCR Review 49 - Minolta Maxxum 700si
Minolta Maxxum 700si – Maxxum Zoom AF 35-70mm 1:4 – Eastman Double-X (5222) @ ASA-200 – FA-1027 (1+19) 10:00 @ 20C

Fur Trade Museum
Intrepid – Fuji Fujinon-W 1:5.6/125 (Orange) – Kodak TMax 100 @ ASA-100 – FA-1027 (1+14) 9:30 @ 20C

LegacyPro Eco Developer – The Eco developer is part of a line of photo chemistry from LegacyPro, the Eco Ascorbic Acid developer is a clone to Kodak Xtol, you can even use the Xtol times for film with this developer. It’s cheaper than it’s Kodak cousin and is actually more environmentally friendly! You can pick up a kit through Argentix.ca!

LegacyPro Mic-X – A recreation of Kodak Microdol-X a well loved developer that Kodak stopped producing. So the folks at LegacyPro took a chance and recreated the legendary developer and now sell it as Mic-X! You can pick up a kit through Argentix.ca!

That’s it for 2016, it’s been a wild year for film and there’s still a lot more for us to cover, so we’ll be getting back to recording in the new year to bring you a third season! That’s right, bigger shows, more guests, and of course lots of filmtastic fun! Maybe even another meet ‘n greet somewhere in this great province!

Looking for a good spot to get your gear and material fix…check out Burlington Camera, Downtown Camera, Film Plus, Belle Arte Camera and Camtech, if you’re in the GTA region of Ontario. In Guelph there’s Pond’s FotoSource For those further north you can visit Foto Art Camera in Owen Sound. On the West Coast (British Columbia) check out Beau Photo Supply. Additionally you can order online at Argentix (Quebec), the Film Photography Project or Freestyle Photographic.

Also you can connect with us through email: classiccamerarevivial[at]gmail[dot]com or by Facebook, we’re at Classic Camera Revival or even Twitter @ccamerarevival