All posts by Alex

Classic Camera Revival – Episode 29 – Clan O’Canon

ccr-logo-leaf

So it seems that our hosts don’t shoot much in the way of Canon cameras, but we do have a decent selection not to mention the full lineup of the professional Canon F-1 cameras!

Cameras Featured on Today’s Episode

Canon F-1 – The F-1 was the direct answer to the Nikon F2. This professional system camera also introduced the famous Canon FD mount and remained fairly similar; there was a slight upgrade in 1976 with the Canon F-1n that made some minor changes both to the operation and cosmetics.

Classic Camera Revival - Episode 29 - Clan O'Canon

  • Make: Canon
  • Model: F-1
  • Type: Single Lens Reflex
  • Format: 135/35mm, 36x24mm
  • Lens: Interchangable, Canon FD Mount
  • Year of Manufacture: 1970, 1976 (F-1n)

Cleveland - Downtown
Canon F-1 – Canon Lens FD 28mm 1:2.8 – Fuji Neopan SS @ ASA-100 – Kodak Xtol (1+1)

Scan-131002-0001
Canon F-1n – Canon Lens FD 28mm 1:2.8 – Fuji Pro 400H

Scan-131002-0008
Canon F-1n – Canon Lens FD 28mm 1:2.8 – Fuji Pro 400H

Canon F-1N – The Canon F-1N is a full upgrade to the classic F-1, with a new prism, and plenty of bells and whistles that kept the old pro camera running until the introduction of the Autofocus EOS system.

Classic Camera Revival - Episode 29 - Clan O'Canon

  • Make: Canon
  • Model: F-1N
  • Type: Single Lens Reflex
  • Format: 135/35mm, 36x24mm
  • Lens: Interchangable, Canon FD Mount
  • Year of Manufacture: 1986

Scan-140530-0007
Canon F-1N – Canon Lens FD 28mm 1:2.8 – Ilford HP5+ – Kodak HC-110 Dil. B

The Local Arriving
Canon F-1N – Canon Lens FD 28mm 1:2.8 – ORWO UN54+ – Kodak Xtol (1+1)

Davisville Yards I
Canon F-1N – Canon Lens FD 50mm 1:1.4 SSC – Ilford HP5+ – Kodak HC-110 Dil. B

Canon FTb – The FTb is a favourite around the table, a mechanical beauty with the amazing QL (Quick Load) system that the team is surprised never made it into other Canon Cameras, especially the professional F-1 series.

Classic Camera Revival - Episode 29 - Clan O'Canon

  • Make: Canon
  • Model: FTb
  • Type: Single Lens Reflex
  • Format: 135/35mm, 36x24mm
  • Lens: Interchangable, Canon FD Mount
  • Year of Manufacture: 1971

Not Open yet.
Canon FTb – Canon FD Lens 50mm 1:1.4 – Fuji Pro 400H

CCR Review 59 - Canon FTb
Canon FTb – Canon FD Lens 50mm 1:1.8 – ORWO UN54 @ ASA-100 – Kodak HC-110 Dil. A 7:30 @ 20C

Snowbench
Canon FTb – Canon FD Lens 50mm 1:1.4 – Kodak ColorPlus 200 @ ASA-200

Canon EOS A-2 – The only EOS camera on the show the A-2 looks more like it was designed by Minolta then Canon. But don’t let that fool you, this is no entry level camera, the A-2 is a direct successor to the FD Mount A-1 series and aims more at the Advanced Amateur or Prosumer market.

Classic Camera Revival - Episode 29 - Clan O'Canon

  • Make: Canon
  • Model: EOS A-2
  • Type: Single Lens Reflex
  • Format: 135/35mm, 36x24mm
  • Lens: Interchangable, Canon EF Mount
  • Year of Manufacture: 1992-2000

CCR - EOS A2
Canon EOS A2 – Canon EF 28-105mm 1:3.5-4.5 – Kodak TMAX 100 – SPUR HRX (1+19) 12:30

CCR - Canon Cast - EOSA2
Canon EOS A2 – Canon EF 28-105mm 1:3.5-4.5 – Kodak TMAX 100 – SPUR HRX (1+19) 12:30

CCR - Canon Cast - EOSA2
Canon EOS A2 – Canon EF 28-105mm 1:3.5-4.5 – Kodak TMAX 100 – SPUR HRX (1+19) 12:30

Looking for a good spot to get your gear and material fix…check out Burlington Camera, Downtown Camera, Film Plus, Belle Arte Camera and Camtech, if you’re in the GTA region of Ontario. In Guelph there’s Pond’s FotoSource For those further north you can visit Foto Art Camera in Owen Sound. On the West Coast (British Columbia) check out Beau Photo Supply. Additionally you can order online at Argentix (Quebec), buyfilm.ca (Ontario), the Film Photography Project or Freestyle Photographic.

Also you can connect with us through email: classiccamerarevivial[at]gmail[dot]com or by Facebook, we’re at Classic Camera Revival or even Twitter @ccamerarevival

#photochat – 25 May 2017 – Regrets

Established in 2013 by MainStreetHost and taken on by Alex Luyckx Photography in 2015, #photochat is a community of photography professionals and enthusiasts who congregate to talk shop and discuss anything and everything photography. To participate in our weekly chat (every Thursday at 1:00pm ET) search the #photochat hashtag to see the conversation, or find me at @AlexLuyckxPhoto on Twitter for more info. Be sure to include the hashtag in your tweets to answer the questions and talk with the other participants.

If there’s a topic you’d like to see covered in #photochat, hop onto Facebook, Twitter, or good old fashioned Email and let me know!

The Topic for Thursday 25 May 2017 is all about Regrets

Question 1 – What is the one piece of Kit you regret getting rid of?
Question 2 – What is the one job you regret taking?
Question 3 – What is the one job you regret not taking?
Question 4 – Do you regret getting into Photography?
Question 5 – Share anything you’ve learned from your regrets!

Past topics have included: What’s in Your Bag (2017), Promotion, Random Questions, Photo Projects, Shooting Film, Photographic Buzz Words, Photographic Wins, Photographic Fails, Still Life, Portrait Photography, Automotive Photography (2017), Traveling With Gear, Photographic Quirks, Why is Photography Important (2017), Ethics (2017), Difficult Situations, Phone Photography, Websites, Self-Improvement (2017), Personal Branding, Photographic Gifts, Brand Loyalties (2016), Location Scouting, Food Photography, The Good, The Bad, Photographic Slumps, Wedding Photography, Post-Processing, Digital Photography, Film Photography, Keeping It Simple, Photographic Fads, Regular Maintenance, Personal Vision, Travel, Snapshots, Extreme Weather, Sports Photography, Pet Peeves, Out of the Box, Portrait Photography, Infrared Photography, Good Practices, Landscape Photography, Photography as a Skill, Photography as an Art, Getting Noticed, Post-Processing, Film Processing, Instant Photography, Tripods, Pet Photography, Budget Photography, Nude Photography, Workflow, Vintage Gear, The 5 W’s, Going Pro, Importance of Photography, Filters, Photography & the Law, Editing Your Work, Travelling with Gear, Street Photography, Get Up and Go (Motivation), Photographic Goals (2016), Low-Light Photography, Photographic Dreams, Cold Weather, Naturally Artificial, LoFi Love, Product Photography, Chasing Light, Automotive Photography, Finding Inspiration, All About You, Landscapes, Shooting for Colour, Digital Video, Back to School Parts I and II, Self-Publishing, Keeping Calm, Photography & Zen, Camera Bags, Dealing with People, Printing Your Work, Adventure Photography, Camera Clubs, Fireworks Photography, Aircraft Photography, Architectural Photography, Photo meetups, Getting Rid of GAS, Keeping it Organized, Favourite Things, Photo Competitions, Biggest Challenges, Compact System Cameras, film vs. digital, landscape photography, seasonal photography, the basics of composition, what’s in your camera bag?, night photography, portrait photography, forced perspective photography, black and white photography, golden hour photography, macro photography, how photography has changed your life, to photoshop or not, motion photography, photojournalism, the best gifts for photographers in 2014, extreme weather photography, photographic aspirations, street photography, “why are you a photographer?”, improvisational lighting tactics, post-processing rituals, photographic blunders, getting paid, photographic triumphs, shooting hardship, photographic anxieties, quick thinking, making a difference, favorites, appropriation, brand loyalties, small photography, BIG photography, focus, photography in advertising, battle scars, sharing your photography, creative evolution, the inanimate subject, photo vs. video, emerging tech, teaching the craft, getting the shot, traveling with your camera, sweet gear deals, mobile lighting solutions, quelling frustrations, finding work, sensitive subjects, DIY projects, defamation, making and maintaining a website, in defense of photography, capturing action, post-processing, photo lingo, cold weather shooting, food photography, death in photography, film photography, famous photos, critiques, videography, user generated content, composition, iPhoneography, standing up for yourself, blogging, workflow, the first time, candid portraiture, copyright and licensing, ethics, gear investments, inspiration, long shots, making it in the photo business, networking, night photography, perks of being a photographer, photographer stressors, photography philosophy, photography trends, picking your priorities, pricing, promoting yourself and your work, protecting your assets, self-improvement, odd photography, and travel.

New York, New York

New York City, a place filled with photographic possibilities. And a city I didn’t think I’d be getting back to anytime soon after my last visit back in 2013. Sure it took five years, but I managed to get back, on my honeymoon no less! And my awesome wife Heather even let me bring some toys along. And by toys I mean cameras. I went loaded for bear, the trusty Nikon FA three AI-S lenses (35, 50, and 105) and lots of photographic film.

Greatly Inscribed

Dames & Dragons

Now usually when I go shooting buildings in a city I tend to capture the full view of the building, getting as wide as I possibly can. This time around I couldn’t do that for a couple of reasons. The first being that the streets in New York, especially in Manhattan, are packed with tall skyscrapers that just don’t allow for the full capture of their grandeur. That is unless you have an ultra-wide angle lens. The widest lens I had with me was my 35mm lens, which while good for some of the shorter buildings just wouldn’t cut it elsewhere. And for some of the stuff I was shooting I needed my 14-24mm lens and either the F5 and F90, neither of which makes for an excellent travel camera when you’re on your honeymoon.

Ornate

A U Properly Shapped

So I decided to take a different approach than what I usually do and got in closer. Because in New York, in the older buildings the details are just as important as the big picture. Having the 105mm and a roll of Japan Camera Hunter Streetpan 400, I went in for the shot while Heather and I made our way north on 5th Avenue towards the Metropolitan Museum of Art. And what a place to shoot buildings, from Sak’s Fifth Avenue to the Art Deco flagship store for Tiffany & Co. Guilded Age skyscrapers to cathedrals of worship. This was a part of New York I had not spent much time in the past.

St. Patrick Details

Remains of Things Past

Of course standing out like a sore thumb is Trump Tower, and I prided myself at not getting any sort of photo of the glass monstrocity. As the 80’s were a horrible decade for fashion, they were pretty terrible for architecture also. Give me gilded age or art deco, the classics. Heck, I even find beauty in the brutalist nature of the 1960s.

The Tiffany & Co. Clock

Rose Window

Nikon FA – AI-S Nikkor 105mm 1:2.5 – JCH Streetpan 400 @ ASA-400 – Kodak HC-110 Dil. B 5:00 @ 20C

#photochat – 18 May 2017 – What’s in Your Bag?

Established in 2013 by MainStreetHost and taken on by Alex Luyckx Photography in 2015, #photochat is a community of photography professionals and enthusiasts who congregate to talk shop and discuss anything and everything photography. To participate in our weekly chat (every Thursday at 1:00pm ET) search the #photochat hashtag to see the conversation, or find me at @AlexLuyckxPhoto on Twitter for more info. Be sure to include the hashtag in your tweets to answer the questions and talk with the other participants.

If there’s a topic you’d like to see covered in #photochat, hop onto Facebook, Twitter, or good old fashioned Email and let me know!

The Topic for Thursday 11 May 2017 is all about what’s in your bag?

Question 1 – What are the primary camera(s) in your bag currently?
Question 2 – What lenses are in your bag currently?
Question 3 – What accessories never leaves your bag?
Question 4 – What camera bag are you currently using?
Question 5 – Share a photo of your camera kit (if you have one) or a past one!

Past topics have included: Promotion, Random Questions, Photo Projects, Shooting Film, Photographic Buzz Words, Photographic Wins, Photographic Fails, Still Life, Portrait Photography, Automotive Photography (2017), Traveling With Gear, Photographic Quirks, Why is Photography Important (2017), Ethics (2017), Difficult Situations, Phone Photography, Websites, Self-Improvement (2017), Personal Branding, Photographic Gifts, Brand Loyalties (2016), Location Scouting, Food Photography, The Good, The Bad, Photographic Slumps, Wedding Photography, Post-Processing, Digital Photography, Film Photography, Keeping It Simple, Photographic Fads, Regular Maintenance, Personal Vision, Travel, Snapshots, Extreme Weather, Sports Photography, Pet Peeves, Out of the Box, Portrait Photography, Infrared Photography, Good Practices, Landscape Photography, Photography as a Skill, Photography as an Art, Getting Noticed, Post-Processing, Film Processing, Instant Photography, Tripods, Pet Photography, Budget Photography, Nude Photography, Workflow, Vintage Gear, The 5 W’s, Going Pro, Importance of Photography, Filters, Photography & the Law, Editing Your Work, Travelling with Gear, Street Photography, Get Up and Go (Motivation), Photographic Goals (2016), Low-Light Photography, Photographic Dreams, Cold Weather, Naturally Artificial, LoFi Love, Product Photography, Chasing Light, Automotive Photography, Finding Inspiration, All About You, Landscapes, Shooting for Colour, Digital Video, Back to School Parts I and II, Self-Publishing, Keeping Calm, Photography & Zen, Camera Bags, Dealing with People, Printing Your Work, Adventure Photography, Camera Clubs, Fireworks Photography, Aircraft Photography, Architectural Photography, Photo meetups, Getting Rid of GAS, Keeping it Organized, Favourite Things, Photo Competitions, Biggest Challenges, Compact System Cameras, film vs. digital, landscape photography, seasonal photography, the basics of composition, what’s in your camera bag?, night photography, portrait photography, forced perspective photography, black and white photography, golden hour photography, macro photography, how photography has changed your life, to photoshop or not, motion photography, photojournalism, the best gifts for photographers in 2014, extreme weather photography, photographic aspirations, street photography, “why are you a photographer?”, improvisational lighting tactics, post-processing rituals, photographic blunders, getting paid, photographic triumphs, shooting hardship, photographic anxieties, quick thinking, making a difference, favorites, appropriation, brand loyalties, small photography, BIG photography, focus, photography in advertising, battle scars, sharing your photography, creative evolution, the inanimate subject, photo vs. video, emerging tech, teaching the craft, getting the shot, traveling with your camera, sweet gear deals, mobile lighting solutions, quelling frustrations, finding work, sensitive subjects, DIY projects, defamation, making and maintaining a website, in defense of photography, capturing action, post-processing, photo lingo, cold weather shooting, food photography, death in photography, film photography, famous photos, critiques, videography, user generated content, composition, iPhoneography, standing up for yourself, blogging, workflow, the first time, candid portraiture, copyright and licensing, ethics, gear investments, inspiration, long shots, making it in the photo business, networking, night photography, perks of being a photographer, photographer stressors, photography philosophy, photography trends, picking your priorities, pricing, promoting yourself and your work, protecting your assets, self-improvement, odd photography, and travel.

CCR Review 63 – Ricoh 500 G

I have and always will have a soft spot for compact fixed lens rangefinders since my first camera was one such camera. The Minolta Hi-Matic 7s. But the Ricoh 500 G is not a Hi-Matic, released at the end of the craze of that style of camera; it is an underdog for its time going up against the cult classic Canon QL17 GIII. And while the 500 G does not share the same spotlight at its Canon counterpart, the 500 G is a strong camera that fills the role of compact rangefinder that packs a punch but won’t break the bank. Special thanks to Mike Bitaxi for loaning this beauty out.

CCR Review 63 - Ricoh 500 G

The Dirt

  • Make: Ricoh
  • Model: 500 G
  • Type: Rangefinder
  • Format: 135 (35mm), 36×24
  • Len: Fixed, Rikenon Lens f=40mm 1:2.8
  • Year of Manufacture: 1972

CCR Review 63 - Ricoh 500 G

CCR Review 63 - Ricoh 500 G

The Good
If you’re into compact rangefinders, this camera is certainly worth a second glance. This camera is small; I mean tiny. Easily fits in your pocket but I wouldn’t recommend it. When it comes to using the camera, it’s a natural fit for anyone with any experience with Minolta, Olympus, or Canon cameras of the same style. Good layout, short throw on the film advance, and an aperture priority meter to boot. But you don’t need to power this camera to get it to work and runs well as a mechanical camera, but I would still stick to aperture priority, set your aperture and run the shutter speed around it. I’ll go into that more in the next section. Optically the camera stands well on its own with the Rikenon Lens pulling off sharp images that suit the focal length perfectly. Add to this the compact size of the camera you have very little in the way of parallax error when composing your images, out of my whole roll shot I only missed the composition on one image and it was out of focus also so it was not a big deal.

CCR Review 63 - Ricoh 500 G

CCR Review 63 - Ricoh 500 G

The Bad
The main issue I had with this camera is that all the controls along the lens barrel are too close together! The aperture control is narrow and tight to the body, and you need two hands to control it. The shutter speed dial is a little better but feels too much like the focus control with the extra grips. The focusing is smooth, but again you’d think it was the shutter speed control at first as it lacks the usual grip pieces. As an automatic aperture priority camera, it wouldn’t be so bad, but I did not have the proper battery for the camera, so I was running it full manual, as you guessed it the camera uses a mercury cell to operate. And finally, there’s the issue of light seals. The entire back door of the camera is one big light seal, every square centimeter of it is covered. Thankfully it’s easy to replace with craft foam, but it makes for a very messy job.

CCR Review 63 - Ricoh 500 G

CCR Review 63 - Ricoh 500 G

The Lowdown
If you’re looking for a camera to work as a compact low-profile street photography camera but don’t want to spend the cash on a camera give the 500 G a solid look. If you find one in good condition, you’ll be laughing. While I’m one to stick with cult cameras, it seems odd that this camera didn’t acquire one. It’s a real sleeper like the Minolta Hi-Matics, and they often don’t command a higher price like Canon or Olympus but quickly give you the same performance of the well known shooters.

All Photos taken in New York, New York
Ricoh 500 G – Rikenon Lens f=40mm 1:2.8 – Ilford FP4+ @ ASA-100 – SPUR HRX (1+20) 9:30 @ 20C

#photochat – 11 May 2017 – Promotion

Established in 2013 by MainStreetHost and taken on by Alex Luyckx Photography in 2015, #photochat is a community of photography professionals and enthusiasts who congregate to talk shop and discuss anything and everything photography. To participate in our weekly chat (every Thursday at 1:00pm ET) search the #photochat hashtag to see the conversation, or find me at @AlexLuyckxPhoto on Twitter for more info. Be sure to include the hashtag in your tweets to answer the questions and talk with the other participants.

If there’s a topic you’d like to see covered in #photochat, hop onto Facebook, Twitter, or good old fashioned Email and let me know!

The Topic for Thursday 11 May 2017 is about Promotion

Question 1 – How do you currently promote your Photography?
Question 2 – What sort of promotions work best for you?
Question 3 – What sort of promotions do you avoid?
Question 4 – Has any of your promotional work helped gain work/publicity?
Question 5 – Are you happy with your level of exposure for your photographic work?

Past topics have included: Random Questions, Photo Projects, Shooting Film, Photographic Buzz Words, Photographic Wins, Photographic Fails, Still Life, Portrait Photography, Automotive Photography (2017), Traveling With Gear, Photographic Quirks, Why is Photography Important (2017), Ethics (2017), Difficult Situations, Phone Photography, Websites, Self-Improvement (2017), Personal Branding, Photographic Gifts, Brand Loyalties (2016), Location Scouting, Food Photography, The Good, The Bad, Photographic Slumps, Wedding Photography, Post-Processing, Digital Photography, Film Photography, Keeping It Simple, Photographic Fads, Regular Maintenance, Personal Vision, Travel, Snapshots, Extreme Weather, Sports Photography, Pet Peeves, Out of the Box, Portrait Photography, Infrared Photography, Good Practices, Landscape Photography, Photography as a Skill, Photography as an Art, Getting Noticed, Post-Processing, Film Processing, Instant Photography, Tripods, Pet Photography, Budget Photography, Nude Photography, Workflow, Vintage Gear, The 5 W’s, Going Pro, Importance of Photography, Filters, Photography & the Law, Editing Your Work, Travelling with Gear, Street Photography, Get Up and Go (Motivation), Photographic Goals (2016), Low-Light Photography, Photographic Dreams, Cold Weather, Naturally Artificial, LoFi Love, Product Photography, Chasing Light, Automotive Photography, Finding Inspiration, All About You, Landscapes, Shooting for Colour, Digital Video, Back to School Parts I and II, Self-Publishing, Keeping Calm, Photography & Zen, Camera Bags, Dealing with People, Printing Your Work, Adventure Photography, Camera Clubs, Fireworks Photography, Aircraft Photography, Architectural Photography, Photo meetups, Getting Rid of GAS, Keeping it Organized, Favourite Things, Photo Competitions, Biggest Challenges, Compact System Cameras, film vs. digital, landscape photography, seasonal photography, the basics of composition, what’s in your camera bag?, night photography, portrait photography, forced perspective photography, black and white photography, golden hour photography, macro photography, how photography has changed your life, to photoshop or not, motion photography, photojournalism, the best gifts for photographers in 2014, extreme weather photography, photographic aspirations, street photography, “why are you a photographer?”, improvisational lighting tactics, post-processing rituals, photographic blunders, getting paid, photographic triumphs, shooting hardship, photographic anxieties, quick thinking, making a difference, favorites, appropriation, brand loyalties, small photography, BIG photography, focus, photography in advertising, battle scars, sharing your photography, creative evolution, the inanimate subject, photo vs. video, emerging tech, teaching the craft, getting the shot, traveling with your camera, sweet gear deals, mobile lighting solutions, quelling frustrations, finding work, sensitive subjects, DIY projects, defamation, making and maintaining a website, in defense of photography, capturing action, post-processing, photo lingo, cold weather shooting, food photography, death in photography, film photography, famous photos, critiques, videography, user generated content, composition, iPhoneography, standing up for yourself, blogging, workflow, the first time, candid portraiture, copyright and licensing, ethics, gear investments, inspiration, long shots, making it in the photo business, networking, night photography, perks of being a photographer, photographer stressors, photography philosophy, photography trends, picking your priorities, pricing, promoting yourself and your work, protecting your assets, self-improvement, odd photography, and travel.

Escaping GAS

No, I’m not talking about real gas, but rather G.A.S, or Gear Acquisition Syndrom. It’s a common problem among many hobbies, but for the most part, it affects photographers, that is photographers who use film based cameras. These days shooting film is pretty sweet, there’s a huge used market where many cameras once thought to be out of reach of even beginner photographers are now easily purchased. When I got my first Nikon, the F80, it was the F5 I wanted, and now I got one for under a thousand, and a Hasselblad for 500. But herein lies the problem, we often find ourselves surrounded by so many cameras it’s next to impossible to determine which camera to take out and shoot that day.

All in the (F)amily
The full line of Nikon professional SLRs, the F to the F5, today I only have the F2 and F5

I’ll admit, I suffered from GAS, at my peak, I had over 30 functioning cameras including the full line of Nikon professional SLRs not to mention a handful of other cameras from Nikon. Medium format, more 35mm equipment, and a couple of large format cameras. It was a collection on the verge of being unsustainable. And that’s something coming from one of the hosts of the Classic Camera Revival Podcast, where our motto is “If you don’t have gear acquisition syndrome now, you will after this show.” It was starting to be a serious problem. And then it happened, the cure, the way out. An Escape from GAS. I got engaged and was going to move in after the wedding with my wife into a condo that had 760 square feet to share with two people. Some cameras had to go, a lot of cameras had to go. And before you jump all over my amazing wife, she never said a word, she in fact fully supported my photographic hobby. The decision was entirely mine because I was tired of taking so long to chose a camera. I needed to cut down, badly.

The Collection - September 2012
Yep, I had a Leica, and you know it was a pain to shoot with, so yes, I sold it.

Step One Over the course of a couple months shoot as you normally would but if you don’t normally log your film photography, start doing so, all you need is a little notebook or if you want to get fancy and really dig deep into the data use a spreadsheet. Make sure you at least capture what cameras and what lenses you use. If you already do this, you can skip over this step and go right to step two.

Step Two Look over your camera logs, figure out the cameras you use the most. These are the cameras that you certainly have to keep since they’re your go-to, your old faithful. There’s no hard or fast rule on a total number of cameras. Any camera you haven’t used in a couple months or more move into the get rid of pile, but don’t worry you don’t have to ditch them all just yet.

Step Three Take a look at your ‘to get rid of’ pile, if you have a sentimental connection to the camera, by all means, keep it. Also look at cameras where you only have one lens for or similar cameras in the keep pile. These are ones that you should actively seek to donate and remove. Again, no hard and fast rule, go with your gut.

Step Four Start offering up cameras to fellow film photographers, you can sell them if you want, but price to sell, not to make a buck on. There are plenty of buy/sell groups on Facebook that you can offer them up on. Alternatively, you can visit local camera shops that has a used gear. My go-to is Burlington Camera, Joan is fair on her prices and knows her stuff. And finally, if you have no desire to sell anything, you can always do the donation route the Film Photography Project is always looking for working cameras to help fuel their School Donation Program!

Step Five The final step and the one that continues on well past the first four. You have to remain vigilant. Keep your kit to the final number, add a camera, drop another. Look to expand your lenses, buy more film instead of new camera bodies. If one breaks and it’s a workhorse, by all means, replace it with the camera or similar camera body.

CCR - Review 11 - Pentax 645
The Pentax 645 a long-time workhorse of my collection, replaced in favour of the Hasselblad 500c

So there you have it, the big secret to escaping GAS, you have to want to. You have to realize this on your own. And you don’t have to set a hard and fast number, and there isn’t a bad thing about GAS, but sometimes the gear becomes more important than the art. Besides, just think of it this way, rather than spend hundreds on a new camera, spend that money on film and get out and use your cameras! Today I’m happily sitting on ten cameras, little duplication, and all ones that I enjoy taking out and shooting with, choice of camera is simple, and I find myself shooting more and thinking about it less. Not to mention I now have the room to expand on my selection of lenses to ensure I have enough coverage, no matter what system I take out.

#photochat – 4 May 2017 – The Random Chat

Established in 2013 by MainStreetHost and taken on by Alex Luyckx Photography in 2015, #photochat is a community of photography professionals and enthusiasts who congregate to talk shop and discuss anything and everything photography. To participate in our weekly chat (every Thursday at 1:00pm ET) search the #photochat hashtag to see the conversation, or find me at @AlexLuyckxPhoto on Twitter for more info. Be sure to include the hashtag in your tweets to answer the questions and talk with the other participants.

If there’s a topic you’d like to see covered in #photochat, hop onto Facebook, Twitter, or good old fashioned Email and let me know!

The Topic for Thursday 4 May 2017 is set to Randomize

Question 1 – How did you come to practice photography?
Question 2 – What Keeps you shooting?
Question 3 – What is your most favourite camera you’ve ever shot with?
Question 4 – If you could get a new piece of gear, without cost, what would that be?
Question 5 – If you could photograph a single subject, who/what/where would it be?

Past topics have included: Photo Projects, Shooting Film, Photographic Buzz Words, Photographic Wins, Photographic Fails, Still Life, Portrait Photography, Automotive Photography (2017), Traveling With Gear, Photographic Quirks, Why is Photography Important (2017), Ethics (2017), Difficult Situations, Phone Photography, Websites, Self-Improvement (2017), Personal Branding, Photographic Gifts, Brand Loyalties (2016), Location Scouting, Food Photography, The Good, The Bad, Photographic Slumps, Wedding Photography, Post-Processing, Digital Photography, Film Photography, Keeping It Simple, Photographic Fads, Regular Maintenance, Personal Vision, Travel, Snapshots, Extreme Weather, Sports Photography, Pet Peeves, Out of the Box, Portrait Photography, Infrared Photography, Good Practices, Landscape Photography, Photography as a Skill, Photography as an Art, Getting Noticed, Post-Processing, Film Processing, Instant Photography, Tripods, Pet Photography, Budget Photography, Nude Photography, Workflow, Vintage Gear, The 5 W’s, Going Pro, Importance of Photography, Filters, Photography & the Law, Editing Your Work, Travelling with Gear, Street Photography, Get Up and Go (Motivation), Photographic Goals (2016), Low-Light Photography, Photographic Dreams, Cold Weather, Naturally Artificial, LoFi Love, Product Photography, Chasing Light, Automotive Photography, Finding Inspiration, All About You, Landscapes, Shooting for Colour, Digital Video, Back to School Parts I and II, Self-Publishing, Keeping Calm, Photography & Zen, Camera Bags, Dealing with People, Printing Your Work, Adventure Photography, Camera Clubs, Fireworks Photography, Aircraft Photography, Architectural Photography, Photo meetups, Getting Rid of GAS, Keeping it Organized, Favourite Things, Photo Competitions, Biggest Challenges, Compact System Cameras, film vs. digital, landscape photography, seasonal photography, the basics of composition, what’s in your camera bag?, night photography, portrait photography, forced perspective photography, black and white photography, golden hour photography, macro photography, how photography has changed your life, to photoshop or not, motion photography, photojournalism, the best gifts for photographers in 2014, extreme weather photography, photographic aspirations, street photography, “why are you a photographer?”, improvisational lighting tactics, post-processing rituals, photographic blunders, getting paid, photographic triumphs, shooting hardship, photographic anxieties, quick thinking, making a difference, favorites, appropriation, brand loyalties, small photography, BIG photography, focus, photography in advertising, battle scars, sharing your photography, creative evolution, the inanimate subject, photo vs. video, emerging tech, teaching the craft, getting the shot, traveling with your camera, sweet gear deals, mobile lighting solutions, quelling frustrations, finding work, sensitive subjects, DIY projects, defamation, making and maintaining a website, in defense of photography, capturing action, post-processing, photo lingo, cold weather shooting, food photography, death in photography, film photography, famous photos, critiques, videography, user generated content, composition, iPhoneography, standing up for yourself, blogging, workflow, the first time, candid portraiture, copyright and licensing, ethics, gear investments, inspiration, long shots, making it in the photo business, networking, night photography, perks of being a photographer, photographer stressors, photography philosophy, photography trends, picking your priorities, pricing, promoting yourself and your work, protecting your assets, self-improvement, odd photography, and travel.

CCR Review 62 – Canon T90

The Canon T90 is a camera since I first laid eyes on it during the first season of the Classic Camera Revival Podcast, I think it was even at the first recording session we did. While the T-Series of cameras are not well viewed, many of them cheap and looking more like that 1980s VCR look you find with the early Minolta Maxxums, the T90 is the odd-man out in the series. Big thanks to Mike Bitaxi for the loan!

CCR Review 62 - Canon T90

The Dirt

  • Make: Canon
  • Model: T90
  • Type: Single Lens Reflex
  • Format: 135 (35mm), 36×24
  • Len: Interchangeable, Canon FD Mount
  • Year of Manufacture: 1986-1987

CCR Review 62 - Canon T90

CCR Review 62 - Canon T90

The Good
If you’ve read through many of these reviews, and if you’re still around, thank you, but the biggest thing I can be overly critical about is the physical feel of a camera. The T90 is no slouch, while the majority of the T-Series are boxes, the T90 is a sleek killing machine. Boxy angles are replaced with smooth lines, something you would see in a modern SLR. This makes the camera comfortable to handle and use even for an extended period. And despite the added weight from the larger size and the six AA batteries that power it, the camera is well balanced. Speaking of the AA batteries, the camera can be powered no matter where you find yourself. General use is spot on, with automatic film loading that seems to come out of the Quick Load system. Then there is the meter, even in the appalling weather I was shooting the camera in, and rain spotted lens the meter was spot on with the exposure, and that was running it in full auto-exposure. I’m sure the same power would be brought for semi-automatic and manual modes. And finally, you can get one relatively cheap on the used market not to mention a broad range of inexpensive glass in the FD mount.

CCR Review 62 - Canon T90

CCR Review 62 - Canon T90

The Bad
Just don’t forget that we’re talking about a thirty-year-old camera, and the biggest issue that the T90 suffers is the electronic failure. If you’re a shooter of the T90, you have heard of the dreaded EEE error. Of course, that means that you’ll need to either get a repair done on it or simply replace the unit. At least there’s still a camera shop out there that can do a full refurbishment on the camera. Despite how well the camera handles it suffers from the one big issue that I have with all Canon cameras, the lack of a second command dial. Now most later EOS cameras have a second thumb dial on the camera back; the T90 lacks this. I guess I’m just used to that on Nikons, but it does pose an issue when shooting outside of semi and fully automatic exposure modes. And finally the buttons are difficult to understand what they’re for without a manual, it took the help of Mike to figure out how to put the camera in Auto-Exposure and Matrix/Average metering mode.

CCR Review 62 - Canon T90

CCR Review 62 - Canon T90

The Lowdown
The T90 is an odd-duck of a camera, and I’m surprised it was never marketed to the Professional market, like the T-1 to bring a sleeker camera to the market with all new features than keeping the old F-1 line going. I mean the camera itself has your favourite parts of the Nikon F3 and the best parts of the F4, and you have something close to the T90. It’s a camera that is perfect for anyone who has a large selection of FD mount lenses. The trouble is that shortly after the T90 came out, Minolta released the autofocus system with the Maxxum line of cameras and Canon was quick on the take and released the EOS system shortly after the T90 rendering the camera and the entire manual focus line of cameras and lenses obsolete.

All Photos taken in Acton, Ontario, Canada
Canon T90 – Vivitar Auto Wide-Angle f=28mm 1:2.5 – JCH Streetpan 400 @ ASA-400 – Blazinal (1+50) 22:00 @ 20C

#photochat – 20 April 2017 – Photo Projects

Established in 2013 by MainStreetHost and taken on by Alex Luyckx Photography in 2015, #photochat is a community of photography professionals and enthusiasts who congregate to talk shop and discuss anything and everything photography. To participate in our weekly chat (every Thursday at 1:00pm ET) search the #photochat hashtag to see the conversation, or find me at @AlexLuyckxPhoto on Twitter for more info. Be sure to include the hashtag in your tweets to answer the questions and talk with the other participants.

If there’s a topic you’d like to see covered in #photochat, hop onto Facebook, Twitter, or good old fashioned Email and let me know!

The Topic for Thursday 20 April 2017 is on Photographic Projects

Question 1 – How do you come up with ideas for a photo project?
Question 2 – What keeps you on task to complete the project?
Question 3 – How do you come up with deadlines for the project?
Question 4 – What do you do with the material when the project ends?
Question 5 – Share your most successful project to date!

Past topics have included: Shooting Film, Photographic Buzz Words, Photographic Wins, Photographic Fails, Still Life, Portrait Photography, Automotive Photography (2017), Traveling With Gear, Photographic Quirks, Why is Photography Important (2017), Ethics (2017), Difficult Situations, Phone Photography, Websites, Self-Improvement (2017), Personal Branding, Photographic Gifts, Brand Loyalties (2016), Location Scouting, Food Photography, The Good, The Bad, Photographic Slumps, Wedding Photography, Post-Processing, Digital Photography, Film Photography, Keeping It Simple, Photographic Fads, Regular Maintenance, Personal Vision, Travel, Snapshots, Extreme Weather, Sports Photography, Pet Peeves, Out of the Box, Portrait Photography, Infrared Photography, Good Practices, Landscape Photography, Photography as a Skill, Photography as an Art, Getting Noticed, Post-Processing, Film Processing, Instant Photography, Tripods, Pet Photography, Budget Photography, Nude Photography, Workflow, Vintage Gear, The 5 W’s, Going Pro, Importance of Photography, Filters, Photography & the Law, Editing Your Work, Travelling with Gear, Street Photography, Get Up and Go (Motivation), Photographic Goals (2016), Low-Light Photography, Photographic Dreams, Cold Weather, Naturally Artificial, LoFi Love, Product Photography, Chasing Light, Automotive Photography, Finding Inspiration, All About You, Landscapes, Shooting for Colour, Digital Video, Back to School Parts I and II, Self-Publishing, Keeping Calm, Photography & Zen, Camera Bags, Dealing with People, Printing Your Work, Adventure Photography, Camera Clubs, Fireworks Photography, Aircraft Photography, Architectural Photography, Photo meetups, Getting Rid of GAS, Keeping it Organized, Favourite Things, Photo Competitions, Biggest Challenges, Compact System Cameras, film vs. digital, landscape photography, seasonal photography, the basics of composition, what’s in your camera bag?, night photography, portrait photography, forced perspective photography, black and white photography, golden hour photography, macro photography, how photography has changed your life, to photoshop or not, motion photography, photojournalism, the best gifts for photographers in 2014, extreme weather photography, photographic aspirations, street photography, “why are you a photographer?”, improvisational lighting tactics, post-processing rituals, photographic blunders, getting paid, photographic triumphs, shooting hardship, photographic anxieties, quick thinking, making a difference, favorites, appropriation, brand loyalties, small photography, BIG photography, focus, photography in advertising, battle scars, sharing your photography, creative evolution, the inanimate subject, photo vs. video, emerging tech, teaching the craft, getting the shot, traveling with your camera, sweet gear deals, mobile lighting solutions, quelling frustrations, finding work, sensitive subjects, DIY projects, defamation, making and maintaining a website, in defense of photography, capturing action, post-processing, photo lingo, cold weather shooting, food photography, death in photography, film photography, famous photos, critiques, videography, user generated content, composition, iPhoneography, standing up for yourself, blogging, workflow, the first time, candid portraiture, copyright and licensing, ethics, gear investments, inspiration, long shots, making it in the photo business, networking, night photography, perks of being a photographer, photographer stressors, photography philosophy, photography trends, picking your priorities, pricing, promoting yourself and your work, protecting your assets, self-improvement, odd photography, and travel.