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While often seen as boring, generic, and nothing special, Mamiya cameras are a favourite among the entire CCR crew, especially their medium format offerings. Alex, James, John, and Bill are joined by a pair of amazing photographers and YouTubers Aly and Jess to discuss their favourite Mamiya cameras!

Mamiya Universal
Probably one of the strangest system cameras to come out of Mamiya, the Universal is the last of their Press line and the most customizable. You can shoot 120/220 roll film from 6×6 to 6×9, 2×3 sheet film, and Polaroid Type-100 (the Universal also was produced as the Polaroid 600 and 600SE). Sadly the camera took all the best parts of a roll film camera and all the worst parts of a 4×5 press camera. It’s clunky and awkward but if you get past that as John says, it’s the best Polaroid camera you’ll ever have.

Camera Review Blog No. 47 - Mamyia Universal

Specs
Make: Mamiya
Model: Universal
Type: Rangefinder
Format: Multiple (Back Dependent), including Medium (120/220, 6×4.5, 6×6, 6×7, and 6×9), Sheet (2×3), Polaroid Type-100
Lens: Interchangeable, Mamiya Press Mount
Shutter: Seiko Leaf Shutter, Lens Integrated
Year of Manufacture: 1969-1970

Rails 1
Mamiya Universal – Mamiya-Sekor 1:4.7 f=127mm – Kodak Portra 160VC
Rails 2
Mamiya Universal – Mamiya-Sekor 1:4.7 f=127mm – Kodak Portra 160VC
Rails 3
Mamiya Universal – Mamiya-Sekor 1:4.7 f=127mm – Kodak Portra 160VC

Mamiya C220F
In one of their brilliant moves, Mamiya saw the popularity of the TLR format and decided to take their TLR to the next level by including interchangeable lenses. And while Bill does love his Rollei TLRs, the C220F is where it’s at. While these cameras aren’t easy on the back or the bank account. They’re worth the money and the effort. Just make sure that when you do get your hands on one, check the bellows and the lenses. You’ll want to spend the extra to get the blue dot (multicoated) lenses.

Mamiya C220f

Specs
Make: Mamiya
Model: C220
Type: Twin Lens Reflex
Format: Medium Format (120/220), 6×6
Lens: Interchangeable, Mamiya C-Mount
Shutter: Seiko Leaf Shutter, Lens Integrated
Year of Manufacture: 1982 – 1990

Heritage Balsam and Lakeshore House
Mamiya C220F – Mamiya-Sekor 1:2.8 f=80mm – Agfa Optima 100
Looking Towards Lakeshore and Allen
Mamiya C220F – Mamiya-Sekor 1:2.8 f=80mm – Agfa Optima 100
Gairloch Gallery on a Saturday Afternoon
Mamiya C220F – Mamiya-Sekor 1:2.8 f=80mm – Agfa Optima 100

Mamiya RB67
When Jess was looking for a medium format SLR for her landscape work, she latched onto the RB67 right away after buying it behind a dumpster in a back ally. Since then the camera has spent far more time in nature. She went for the RB rather than the RZ because the RB is mechanical (and has to survive Quebec winters) and shoots an amazing 6×7 negative, plus having interchangeable mid-roll film backs allows both colour and black & white film on every trip. And while many will say this camera is more designed for studio, the weight doesn’t matter. Check out one of Jess’ videos about taking the RB67 into the woods!

Camera Review Blog No. 40 - Mamiya RB67

Make: Mamiya
Model: RB67
Type: Single Lens Reflex
Format: Medium (120/220), 6×7, Type-100
Lens: Interchangeable, RB Mount
Shutter: Seiko Leaf Shutter, Lens Integrated
Year of Manufacture: 1970-1974

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Mamiya m645
After dumping his Pentax 645, Alex felt that he needed another 6×4.5 format SLR, similar to the Hasselblad. Sure there were Bronicas, but he had some bad experiences. Well, the m645 fell into his lap, and he hasn’t looked back since. While a little vanilla, the optics are excellent, and with a waist-level finder and 80/2.8 it can be a compact travel medium format SLR. Sadly there’s no mid-roll interchange and only 15 shots on a roll rather than the full 16. If you are going for one with the Eye-Level Finder, get the L-Grip, makes handling the camera so much easier.

The Tool Kit - 2019 - Mamiya m645

Make: Mamiya
Model: m645
Type: Single Lens Reflex
Format: Medium Format (120/220), 6×4.5
Lens: Interchangeable, Mamiya m645 Mount
Shutter: Electromagnetic Cloth Focal Plane Shutter, 8″ – 1/500″ + Bulb
Year of Manufacture: 1975-87

St. Paul's
Mamiya m645 – Mamiya-Sekor C 35mm 1:3.5 N – Kodak TMax 400 @ ASA-400 – Ilford Ilfotec HC (1+31) 6:30 @ 20C
FRB No. 62 - Ilford SFX 200 - Roll 04 (Ilford Microphen)
Mamiya m645 – Mamiya-Sekor C 45mm 1:2.8 – Ilford SFX 200 @ ASA-200 – Ilford Microphen (Stock) 8:30 @ 20C
Nassagaweya
Mamiya m645 – Mamiya-Sekor C 35mm 1:3.5 N – Rollei RPX 25 @ ASA-25 – Adox FX-39 II (1+9) 8:00 @ 20C

Mamiya 645 Pro
For Aly the choice of the Mamiya 645 Pro came with a lot of deliberation. But having all those considerations landed her a stunning camera that has become a top choice for medium format work, especially with the 45mm f/2.8 lens (which is a rocking lens). While she’s happy with the prism finder and winder grip, she does want to find a WLF. It is an improvement over the m645 as it takes mid-roll interchangeable backs and shoots the full 16 shots.

Mamiya 645 Pro Camera

Make: Mamiya
Model: 645 Pro
Type: Single Lens Reflex
Format: Medium Format (120/220), 6×4.5
Lens: Interchangeable, Mamiya m645 Mount
Shutter: Electronic Focal Plane Shutter, 4″ (or 8″ /w AE prism) – 1/1000″ + Blub + Time
Meter: 2x SBC, EV1 ~ EV19, ASA-12 – ASA-3200
Year of Manufacture: 1992-1997

TreesPublic Washroom Building labeled RestroomA church in the distance with a white steeple

Mamiya 645 AF-D
The final iteration of the 645 families is the autofocus versions. Unlike the previous two models, the new cameras could not accept the manual focus lenses. For James, the 645 AF-D is great because it can do as much or as little as you want it to. It’s built like a tank and has all the perks of the previous version. While less of a ‘system’ camera it still shoots like a modern digital or film camera. While not his first choice for portraits (optics are too contrasty) it is a great ‘point-and-shoot’. While the AF-D cannot accept digital backs, the later versions can accept a digital back.

Camera Review Blog No. 82 - Mamiya 645 AF-D

Make: Mamiya
Model: 645 AF-D III
Type: Single Lens Reflex
Format: Medium Format (120/220), 6×4.5
Lens: Interchangeable, Mamiya 645 AF Mount
Autofocus: ???
Light Meter: Full Matrix Metering, EV2 ~ EV19 @ ASA-100, ASA-25 – ASA-6400
Shutter: Electronic Metal Vertical Travel Focal Plane Shutter, 30″ – 1/4000″ + Blub & Time
Year of Manufacture: Post-2001

TFS-02_28_16-03
Mamiya 645 AF-D – Mamiya 645 AF 80mm 1:2.8 – Ilford FP4+ – Kodak HC-110 Dil. B 7:00 @ 20C
Old Man of the Wood
Mamiya 645 AF-D – Mamiya 645 AF 80mm 1:2.8 – Ilford FP4+ – Kodak HC-110 Dil. B 7:00 @ 20C
TFS-02_28_16-06
Mamiya 645 AF-D – Mamiya 645 AF 80mm 1:2.8 – Ilford FP4+ – Kodak HC-110 Dil. B 7:00 @ 20C

Want a subscription to SilverGrain Classics and are a fan of Classic Camera Revival? Visit their shop online and buy a magazine or a subscription? Looking for a good spot to get your gear and material fix check out Burlington Camera (Burlington, ON), Downtown Camera (Toronto, ON), Film Plus (Toronto, ON), Belle Arte Camera (Hamilton, ON), Pond’s FotoSource (Guleph, ON), Foto Art Camera (Owen Sound, ON). Out West there’s The Camera Store (Calgary, AB) and Beau Photo Supply (Vancouver, BC). Additionally you can order online at Argentix (Quebec), buyfilm.ca (Ontario), the Film Photography Project or Freestyle Photographic. Looking for development options, check out these labs that have our support, Boréalis Photo Lab, Old School Photo Lab, The Darkroom, and Film Rescue International.

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