Like the Canal, the industries that formed along the corridor needed to adapt and change as technology, power, and market demand changed throughout history. During the early day of the Canal, industries could get by working in a relatively small area. Local grain, timber, and materials were brought to the mills, and then the products were used within the local market. The Canadian Industry during the first part of the 19th Century remained local, colonial, provincial. They were dedicated mainly to the extraction and processing of raw materials. But the 1850s brought two significant changes, the first being an effective railway network that provided furtherRead More →

Like most history, there is always a bit of legend mixed in with fact and a fair amount of embellishment. That statement is even true when it comes to PL Robertson. If you live in Canada you know well the socket or square head screw, it’s standard across all provinces and all trades. Peter L. Robertson would often tell the story of how, as a screw salesman, a slotted screwdriver slipped during a demonstration and sliced his arm. Being both a salesman and an inventor, Robertson decided to invent a safer head for the standard screw. Although the more likely story is that Robertson sawRead More →

The Greenwhich-Mohawk industrial brownfield site provided the backdrop for Week 20. This massive complex in Brantford, Ontario has been up for development for years since the last business left late last century. The site dates back to the mid 1800s, providing homes to many companies such as Massy-Furguson and the Cockshutt Plow company. Recently they hosted an open house that allowed local photographers to come and visit and photograph the location to raise awareness for the project. It was a cold damp day like many have been over the course of spring here in Ontario, so I opted for a fast black and white filmRead More →

The MetalTech Foundry in Woodstock has always been one of my favourite abandoned Industrial locations. First built in 1913, it changed hands several times over it’s life before finally closing in 2005. And it is the subject for Week 14. See I said abandoned stuff would come back. Nikon F4/AF Nikkor 35mm 1:2D/Kodak Tri-X 400 (400TX)Read More →

No, these aren’t photos from an electric six concert. But rather one of my favourite places to go visit, the former Firestone plant on Hamilton’s industrial sector. This ancient structure, tucked neatly away behind a very active recycling complex (which was also at one time a part of the factory as a whole) was first built in 1921, and expanded over the years. It shuttered it’s doors in 2001, from active use (Firestone had already left it in 1987). It made the perfect place to give my Nikon F4 a work out, pairing this pro camera from the late 1980s (It was released the yearRead More →