Back to the boxes! There is something oddly satifying about shooting with box cameras. Take away all the fancy settings, lens choices, aperture, shutter speed and you’re left with, at least in Nikon’s words, Pure Photography. Point, Guess, Shoot, Enjoy. And that’s exactly what you get with the Agfa Box 50. One of many cameras in the “Box” line. This particular camera was one that belonged to my Opa Oosthoek, that is my mom’s father and has been passed down through my family. In fact we have several photos at home that were taken on this camera. Special thanks to my mom for loaning meRead More →

There are certain brand names in cameras and even models of cameras that carry a certain quality that goes along with it, and often the idea that the simple matter of owning one will improve the quality of your photographs by extension. One of those names is Leica. The Leica has been attached to many greats within the world of photography. The Barnack Leicas are among those cameras and have created great images in the hands of famous photographers. So I went into this and found a good camera at a fair price, but I soon found that maybe Leica wasn’t for me, having goneRead More →

When it comes to rangefinders if you know me I’m not a fan. They just don’t fit, I struggle to use them, and generally, I am more likely to reach for an SLR. But then there’s my Contax IIIa, for some reason this is the rangefinder I just won’t let go of, it’s far from perfect, needs a bit of work, often is a bit frustrating to use. It suffers from frame spacing issues, and I’m sure one day, it’s just going to give up the ghost. Yet since the first time I picked it up off of John Meadows, I am often drawn backRead More →

The Minolta X-700 was a game changer for Minolta it introduced to their shooters a camera that had a full program auto-exposure mode as well as semi-auto (aperture priority) mode and manual all in a lightweight body backed by some great optics. It also introduced a whole host of cousins in the X line of Minolta cameras. Actually my second Minolta SLR was an X-7a basically the same as the X700 but lacked the program mode. This is a great camera for a beginner photographer as it gives them a chance to experience every mode that is generally used and these cameras can be prettyRead More →

Probably one of my more interesting cameras in my tool kit, but one that I really like but don’t take out often enough. I guess that’s the biggest problem with having a lot of working cameras. This Lomography camera is a copy of the Zenit Horzion 202, a panoramic camera designed for use in the Soviet Space program during the height of the cold war. This odd camera certainly caught my eye so when I netted a good discount with Lomography I went and picked it up. While not one work with every day, it’s still a really fun camera for a different look. TheRead More →

The bakelite beast, the snap shot camera of the 1950s and a staple camera in most every antique camera store I’ve visited. The Brownie Hawkeye flash was one of many cheap Kodak snapshot cameras that was a staple of plenty of families and still stands up today as a solid starter 620 camera because you can actually use a 120 spool in the camera providing you have a 620 spool in the take up! But although it works, I really don’t recommend it, as you’ll often damage the film itself. The Dirt Make: Kodak Model: Brownie Hawkeye Flash Type: Point and Shoot Format: Medium FormatRead More →

Even though it looks like the iconic Kodak Brownie, we’re going to clear the record; this camera is not a Brownie. And although this model came after the Brownie, it is a camera that has its origins before the Brownie and flexible films. The Hawk-Eye is a camera that I don’t take out that often the reason being that it stands at over 100 years old. I did get it before it joined the century club and at that point, I still thought it was part of the Brownie family. I took it out for review shortly after its 100th birthday. A basic, no-nonsense cheap,Read More →

It’s yet another winner from the wonderful folks at Olympus! This is probably my favourite modern point & shoot camera, no fuss, no muss. If I want to just go out and shoot and not have to worry about carrying bags of additional gear, or at a wedding when you don’t want to pull out the SLR and don’t want to fiddle with an XA. Small, compact, with amazing results. The Dirt Make: Olympus Model: Stylus Epic DLX (ยต[mju:]-II) Type: Point and Shoot Format: 35mm, 35x24mm Lens: Fixed, Olympus Lens 35mm 1:2.8 Year of Manufacture: 1997 The Good Probably the best part about this cameraRead More →

Playing along the same lines of the fixed lens camera rangefinders of the 1960s and 70s the Olympus 35 SP is one of the top models that you can get from that era, I’d actually rank it equal with the Minolta Hi-Matic 7s. And the best part as many people go for the Cannonet line of cameras, the 35 SP again like the 7s is more of an underdog camera and like many Olympus cameras has gained somewhat of a cult following. But what made the camera stand out among it’s peers that a dual metering system that had both a center weighted and anRead More →

The Nikon F is the great-grandfather of all the professional level Nikon SLRs, yes even modern digital professional digital SLRs can trace their ancestry back to the Nikon F. The Nikon F introduced the idea of a system SLR where everything could be swapped out to make the camera fit the task you wanted it to do and your own personal style as a photographer and saw production for just under two decades before being replaced by the Nikon F2. For this review, I’ll be running with a Nikon F Photomic FTn however the meter is no longer working. The Dirt Make: Nikon Model: FRead More →