We have a little bit of Saturday Night Fever here at the Classic Camera Revival and we just cannot get enough of those disco-era cameras from the 1970s. Turn up the Beegee’s, and get on your best bell bottoms, ’cause gimmie, gimmie, gimmie a cam before midnight! Camera’s featured on Today’s Show Minolta XE-7 – Back in the 1970s, Leica and Minolta joined forces and produced several ‘cousin’ cameras, the first being the Minolta CLE/Leica CL. But the second camera to come out of the Alliance was the Minolta XE-7, cousins with the Leica R3. And while at forty-yards the two may look alike, whenRead More →

Playing along the same lines of the fixed lens camera rangefinders of the 1960s and 70s the Olympus 35 SP is one of the top models that you can get from that era, I’d actually rank it equal with the Minolta Hi-Matic 7s. And the best part as many people go for the Cannonet line of cameras, the 35 SP again like the 7s is more of an underdog camera and like many Olympus cameras has gained somewhat of a cult following. But what made the camera stand out among it’s peers that a dual metering system that had both a center weighted and anRead More →

A favoured camera of the street photography group, the rangefinder, is one of those niche cameras that is often associated with brands like Leica. However while none of us have a Leica to present this episode we have some fine (cheaper) alternatives to the Leica that are sure to get your attention. The main feature of the rangefinder is that the viewfinder is often off-set from the taking lens, and uses a super-imposed image that you ‘line up’ to get the focus. However, composing takes a bit of work. The first rangefinders were produced by Kodak back in 1916, but really got popular in 1925Read More →