There’s too much confusion; I can’t get no relief… When it comes to photography, there is a lot of information out there, cameras, formats, film types, developer types, processes. There’s a lot, and it’s all rather complicated because some of the information dates back over 100 years. So today I’m going to do a little bit of a breakdown and hopefully clear up some of the confusion I’ve seen online as of late. Plates Before flexible films, there were plates. We’re talking Glass here that is sensitised and used to capture images. These plates did not conform to the standard sizes we’re used to today.Read More →

Toronto resident Mike Robinson is a master of the¬†Daguerreotype process, producing images of unparalleled beauty and technical excellence. In this bonus episode, John talks with Mike about the challenges and rewards of this venerable photographic process A video of Mike at work Mike has been kind enough to supply us with some images of his recent work. All images are copyright Mike Robinson, all rights reserved.  Read More →

Located on a sleepy treelined street in Ann Arbor Michigan in an old building is a museum, while not large, holds a piece of Americana, the Argus Museum. I was inspired by Mark O’Brien who mentioned this museum on Episode 108 of the Film Photography Podcast and decided to take a trip to visit on my way home from Ohio on the August Long Weekend. One of the neat features of the museum is where it’s located, not just Ann Arbor, but in the original buildings that the cameras were made in. That’s right, instead of demolishing or letting them fall apart (which would’ve beenRead More →

Thinking inside the box is one thing that George Eastman did not do, that became very clear after a visit to the George Eastman House in Rochester, NY. But in the case of this entry, the box is what I was thinking in. Using box cameras is not something new to me, having used my mom’s Agfa Box 50 in the past and loved the format. This is a basic of a camera as you can get without going to a pinhole. The camera is mostly cardboard, metal on the insides, a single lens, rolling shutting, fixed aperature. Meet the Kodak Brownie Model 2, theRead More →