Tag: st. jacobs

CCR Review 85 – Pentax MG

CCR Review 85 – Pentax MG

I don’t mean to knock a camera right off the bat, but honestly, Pentax could have done far better than the Pentax MG. Built as part of the compact M series of Pentax SLRs following the release of the Olympus OM-1. Designed as an entry level camera and it shows, bare-bones, simple, and so small it hurts. But you have to take the good with the bad in these reviews, and it’s been a while since I found a camera that I immediately disliked the moment I picked it up. Thanks to James Lee for loaning out the MG for review.

CCR Review 85 - Pentax MG

The Dirt
Make: Pentax
Model: MG
Type: Single Lens Reflex
Format: 35mm, 36x24mm
Lens: Interchangeable, Pentax K Mount
Year of Manufacture: 1981-1984

CCR Review 85 - Pentax MGCCR Review 85 - Pentax MG

The Good
Probably the best part about the camera is the fact it has a K-Mount, you have at least access to a set of fantastic lenses that you can easily mount, and you may even get a solid Pentax-M lens attached when you get the camera. Operations are simple, a pull out to turn on with the advance lever and that has a great short throw. You have your shutter speeds displayed along the edge of your viewfinder which is far better than the MV which was the original entry-level camera of the M-Series. But in this case, as soon as I took the camera out the battery died, thankfully the manual override speed of 1/100″ I could at least using the Sunny-16 technic to keep going. And the camera has next to no weight so it can be carried in any bag or even a large pocket if you must especially if you have the 28mm Pentax-M lens.

CCR Review 85 - Pentax MGCCR Review 85 - Pentax MG

The Bad
As I mentioned in the introduction, the camera is so small it hurts. I can barely wrap my hands around it comfortably. Which is, what the designers were going for, but honestly even though it’s light I couldn’t imagine using it for a whole day and actually enjoying it. Despite being easy to use, the camera itself feels cramped. I’ve had the chance to use both the ME and ME Super, and while they are designed to be semi-automatic cameras, they at least have a little more space around the controls. And finally the viewfinder is fairly dim, even with an f/2 or f/2.8 lens and the LED readout for the shutter speeds works great in daylight but in low light situations can be hard to read.

CCR Review 85 - Pentax MGCCR Review 85 - Pentax MG

The Lowdown
The small form-factor Pentax cameras are excellent choices, they provide a less-expensive option and if you already have a set of K-Mount lenses, you can easily move between the larger models like the K-Series and the M-Series with ease. But you want to avoid the entry-level options. If you are considering a purchase the ME Super or MX will be a better choice than the MV, MV1 and especially the MG.

All Photos Taken in St. Jacobs, Ontario
Pentax MG – SMC Pentax-M 1:2.8 28mm – Fomapan 200 @ ASA-100
Pyrocat-HD (1+1+100) 8:00 @ 20C

CCR Review 13 – Canon F-1

CCR Review 13 – Canon F-1

The F-1 was Canon’s response to the Nikon F line and the direct competitor to the Nikon F2. The first in a long line of trusted professional SLR system cameras the F-1 is a rugged mechanical beast that today is fairly forgotten with many prefering to work with modern EOS cameras for lens compatablities. While a camera I don’t take out that much because I prefer to work with Nikon systems. The F-1 is a solid mechanical camera that would, if not for the price tag, be a good learner camera.

CCR - Review 13 - Canon F-1
The F-1 certainly cuts a nice figure

The Dirt
Maker: Canon
Model: F-1
Type: 35mm Single Lens Reflex
Lens: Interchangeable, Canon FD Mount
Year of Manufacture: 1971-1984

CCR - Review 13 - Canon F-1

CCR - Review 13 - Canon F-1

The Good
If you ever wanted the thrill of shooting a professional camera, the F-1 certainly would fit the bill infact because it’s all mechanical it makes for a great camera to learn the art of 35mm photography. You can easily find one for 100$ or less and you have a huge library of lenses that can also be had for cheap because Canon no longer uses the FD mount (unlike Nikon and Pentax that both still use the same mount as they did early on). And being a system camera if some parts bugger up, you don’t have to go out and pick up a whole new camera just replace the part that failed and carry on.

CCR - Review 13 - Canon F-1

CCR - Review 13 - Canon F-1

The Bad
These uses the old style mercury cell so you will need to either adapt a modern battery or simply work with an external meter or sunny-16 rule to use the camera. Like many professional cameras finding one in perfect shape is hard, but they do take a beating and keep going, but you may want to invest in a clean/lube/adjust before taking it out in the field. My camera currently suffers from a spacing issue on the film advance, but as I rarely take it out, I haven’t bothered to have it looked at.

CCR - Review 13 - Canon F-1

CCR - Review 13 - Canon F-1

The Low Down
If you’re just getting started in 35mm photography and have some familiarity with Canon the F-1 is a sure bet, just know you cannot use your EOS lenses with the camera. In fact my good friend Julie Douglas learned the art of photography on an F-1 and still uses it to this day. But if you want to step away from one of the T-series cameras or want a back up for your AE-1 Program, the F-1 will certainly be a welcome addition.

All Photos shot at the St. Jacobs’ Market in St. Jacobs Ontario.
Canon F-1 – Canon FD Lens 28mm 1:2.8 – Ilford FP4+ @ ASA-125 – Ilford Ilfosol 3 (1+14) 7:30 @ 20C

400TX:365 – Week 15 – St. Jacobs

400TX:365 – Week 15 – St. Jacobs

I seem to be going on a small town kick for this project. Week 15 brought be out to St. Jacobs. After an early start to the day and a run up to Lindsay to pick up a puppy with my friend Nicole I headed out to the Kitchener-Waterloo area for a friend’s stag-and-doe. But I took some extra time to head up to St. Jacobs. I usually stick to the area around the Highway as that’s where there’s this awesome antique store. But I never ventured into the historic downtown. Like many towns that grew up in this part of Ontario it was based around a mill, St. Jacobs is no different. The mill operations are long gone, however the mill is now an arts complex.

400TX:365 - Week 15 - St. Jacobs

400TX:365 - Week 15 - St. Jacobs

400TX:365 - Week 15 - St. Jacobs

400TX:365 - Week 15 - St. Jacobs

400TX:365 - Week 15 - St. Jacobs

400TX:365 - Week 15 - St. Jacobs

400TX:365 - Week 15 - St. Jacobs