Tag Archives: FP4Party

CCR Review 63 – Ricoh 500 G

I have and always will have a soft spot for compact fixed lens rangefinders since my first camera was one such camera. The Minolta Hi-Matic 7s. But the Ricoh 500 G is not a Hi-Matic, released at the end of the craze of that style of camera; it is an underdog for its time going up against the cult classic Canon QL17 GIII. And while the 500 G does not share the same spotlight at its Canon counterpart, the 500 G is a strong camera that fills the role of compact rangefinder that packs a punch but won’t break the bank. Special thanks to Mike Bitaxi for loaning this beauty out.

CCR Review 63 - Ricoh 500 G

The Dirt

  • Make: Ricoh
  • Model: 500 G
  • Type: Rangefinder
  • Format: 135 (35mm), 36×24
  • Len: Fixed, Rikenon Lens f=40mm 1:2.8
  • Year of Manufacture: 1972

CCR Review 63 - Ricoh 500 G

CCR Review 63 - Ricoh 500 G

The Good
If you’re into compact rangefinders, this camera is certainly worth a second glance. This camera is small; I mean tiny. Easily fits in your pocket but I wouldn’t recommend it. When it comes to using the camera, it’s a natural fit for anyone with any experience with Minolta, Olympus, or Canon cameras of the same style. Good layout, short throw on the film advance, and an aperture priority meter to boot. But you don’t need to power this camera to get it to work and runs well as a mechanical camera, but I would still stick to aperture priority, set your aperture and run the shutter speed around it. I’ll go into that more in the next section. Optically the camera stands well on its own with the Rikenon Lens pulling off sharp images that suit the focal length perfectly. Add to this the compact size of the camera you have very little in the way of parallax error when composing your images, out of my whole roll shot I only missed the composition on one image and it was out of focus also so it was not a big deal.

CCR Review 63 - Ricoh 500 G

CCR Review 63 - Ricoh 500 G

The Bad
The main issue I had with this camera is that all the controls along the lens barrel are too close together! The aperture control is narrow and tight to the body, and you need two hands to control it. The shutter speed dial is a little better but feels too much like the focus control with the extra grips. The focusing is smooth, but again you’d think it was the shutter speed control at first as it lacks the usual grip pieces. As an automatic aperture priority camera, it wouldn’t be so bad, but I did not have the proper battery for the camera, so I was running it full manual, as you guessed it the camera uses a mercury cell to operate. And finally, there’s the issue of light seals. The entire back door of the camera is one big light seal, every square centimeter of it is covered. Thankfully it’s easy to replace with craft foam, but it makes for a very messy job.

CCR Review 63 - Ricoh 500 G

CCR Review 63 - Ricoh 500 G

The Lowdown
If you’re looking for a camera to work as a compact low-profile street photography camera but don’t want to spend the cash on a camera give the 500 G a solid look. If you find one in good condition, you’ll be laughing. While I’m one to stick with cult cameras, it seems odd that this camera didn’t acquire one. It’s a real sleeper like the Minolta Hi-Matics, and they often don’t command a higher price like Canon or Olympus but quickly give you the same performance of the well known shooters.

All Photos taken in New York, New York
Ricoh 500 G – Rikenon Lens f=40mm 1:2.8 – Ilford FP4+ @ ASA-100 – SPUR HRX (1+20) 9:30 @ 20C

Classic Camera Revival – Episode 25 – The Minolta Warriors

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Cameras Featured on Today’s Episode

Minolta SRT-102 – This mechanical beast is an all mechanical, match-needle SLR. It has all the same features as the SRT-101 but what sets it apart is a hot shoe for a standard flash. From the viewfinder, you have both your aperture and shutter speed displayed which helps with setting the exposure without loosing the scene. Through the rest of the world, the camera is known as the SRT Super or SRT-303.

Classic Camera Revival - Episode 25 - The Minolta Warriors

  • Make: Minolta
  • Model: SRT-102
  • Type: Single Lens Reflex
  • Format: 35mm, 36x24mm
  • Lens: Interchangeable, Minolta MD
  • Year of Manufacture: 1973

Evening Dog Walk
Minolta SRT-102 – MC Rokkor-PG 50mm 1:1.5 – Fomapan 200 – Kodak Xtol (1+1) 8:30 @ 20C

Goof
Minolta SRT-102 – MC Rokkor-PG 50mm 1:1.5 – Ilford HP5+ – Kodak HC-110 Dil. B 5:00 @ 20C

Weekend Retreat
Minolta SRT-102 – MC Rokkor-PG 50mm 1:1.5 – ORWO UN54 – Kodak Xtol (1+1) 8:00 @ 20C

Minolta XE-5 – A less advanced version of the Minolta XE-7 (or XE/XE-1), this metering is either full manual or aperture priority. The camera does require a battery to function but there is a manual override that has a fixed shutter speed. It was not sold in Japan.

Minolta XE-5

  • Make: Minolta
  • Model: XE-5
  • Type: Single Lens Reflex
  • Format: 35mm, 36x24mm
  • Lens: Interchangeable, Minolta MD
  • Year of Manufacture: 1975

Never Gets Old
Minolta XE-5 – Minolta Rokkor PF 58mm ƒ/1.4 – Fujichrome Sensia 100

Lakeside View
Minolta XE-5 – Minolta Rokkor PF 58mm ƒ/1.4 – Fujichrome Sensia 100

Beach Log
Minolta XE-5 – Minolta Rokkor PF 58mm ƒ/1.4 – Fujichrome Sensia 100

Minolta Maxxum 700si – Taking a huge jump into the 90s the Maxxum 700si is a solid and accessible choice for getting into film photography. It takes readily available 35mm film, it’s entirely automated, cheap, easy to use, and with the Minolta A-Mount if you use the Sony line of Alpha digital SLRs, your full-frame lenses couple perfectly with the camera.

Classic Camera Revival - Episode 25 - The Minolta Warriors

  • Make: Minolta
  • Model: Maxxum 700si
  • Type: Single Lens Reflex
  • Format: 35mm, 36x24mm
  • Lens: Interchangeable, Minolta A-Mount
  • Year of Manufacture: 1993

Toronto - November 2016
Minolta Maxxum 700si – AF Maxxum 35-70mm 1:4 – Kodak Panatomic-X @ ASA-32 – Blazinal (1+50) 10:00 @ 20C

Toronto - November 2016
Minolta Maxxum 700si – AF Maxxum 35-70mm 1:4 – Kodak Panatomic-X @ ASA-32 – Blazinal (1+50) 10:00 @ 20C

Toronto - November 2016
Minolta Maxxum 700si – AF Maxxum 35-70mm 1:4 – Kodak Panatomic-X @ ASA-32 – Blazinal (1+50) 10:00 @ 20C

The FP4Party!back in August of 2016 and it’s been gaining some traction on Twitter, even Ilford is loving this! And yes, we at CCR are big fans of FP4+! So if you want to follow along and join in the fun, you can follow the twitter feed at #FP4party.

Project:1812 - Battle of the Chateauguay
Hasselblad 500c – Carl Zeiss Planar 80mm 1:2.8 – Ilford FP4+ @ ASA-100 – Kodak D-23 (Stock) 6:00 @ 20C

Waiting for the Streecar
Rolleiflex 3.5E3 – Schneider-Kruzenack Xenotar 75mm/3.5 – Ilford FP4+ – Rodinal (1+50) 14:00 @ 20C

Sherman Falls 2011
Rolleiflex 3.5E – Schneider-Kruzenack Xenotar 75mm/3.5 – Ilford FP4+ – Kodak HC-110 Dil. B 7:00 @ 20C

Seneca Behind The Bush
Kodak Brownie Hawkeye Flash – Kodak Meniscus Lens f=75mm f/14.5 – Ilford FP4+ – Ilford Ilfosol 3 (1+14) 7:30 @ 20C

Yes, that’s right, at the Consumer Electronics Show at the beginning of this month Kodak Alaris announced they would be releasing a new version of Ektachrome E100! The new film is due to be released in Q4 of this year! The film is not a return of dead stock but a fresh new version. We at CCR are looking forward to getting our hands on the material and should have an in-depth review of the material in either December or January next year!

Downtown Bristol VA/TN
Downtown Bristol VA/TN – Co-Host Alex had a chance to eat here back in March of last year as was rather impressed with the food!
Pentax 645 – SMC Pentax A 645 35mm 1:3.5 – Kodak Ektachrome E100VS – Processing By: Old School Photo Lab

Looking for a good spot to get your gear and material fix…check out Burlington Camera, Downtown Camera, Film Plus, Belle Arte Camera and Camtech, if you’re in the GTA region of Ontario. In Guelph there’s Pond’s FotoSource For those further north you can visit Foto Art Camera in Owen Sound. On the West Coast (British Columbia) check out Beau Photo Supply. Additionally you can order online at Argentix (Quebec), the Film Photography Project or Freestyle Photographic.

Also you can connect with us through email: classiccamerarevivial[at]gmail[dot]com or by Facebook, we’re at Classic Camera Revival or even Twitter @ccamerarevival