Tag Archives: konica

An Extra Special Gift

This was certainly a first for me. I’ve been doing the photography thing for many years, and while my favourite subjects are things that really can’t move around, I do find myself enjoying the few portrait and wedding gigs that I come across. But when it came to shooting maternity it was all new territory. And it can be a pretty creepy one also. You look at places like Pinterest, and you can get carried away by semi-nude women showing off their pregnant bodies. Now before you lay on the hate, I’m not saying that’s a bad thing or wrong. I just don’t like that style of shooting, and when my subjects are my soon-to-be brother & sister-in-law. That’s just not the direction I want to take.

Evan & Holly - Maternity Shoot
Sony a6000 + Konica Hexanon 1:2.8 f=35mm

Evan & Holly - Maternity Shoot
Sony a6000 + Konica Hexanon 1:2.8 f=35mm

The idea is Heather’s who came up with the idea to do a shoot with them once we found out they were expecting, and it became all the more special when the one baby was two. Yep, instant niece and nephew added in, and just before my wedding. It did take Holly a bit of time to warm up to the idea of having maternity photos done. And I can understand that she also does photography, and it’s difficult for a photographer to stand in front of the camera rather than behind.

Evan & Holly - Maternity Shoot
Sony a6000 + KMZ Helios 44-2 2/58

Evan & Holly - Maternity Shoot
Nikon F5 – AF Nikkor 50mm 1:1.4D – Kodak Tri-X 400 @ ASA-250 – SPUR HRX (1+17) 11:00 @ 20C

Thankfully we had just the right weather to be outside, well it was a little cold for Evan and Holly, I at least could keep my coat on. And for the backdrop, we took advantage of being in Hamilton the city of waterfalls and worked at Tiffany and Sherman Falls. What makes this whole thing extra special is that Evan and Holly had been waiting a long time to start a family, so it was an amazing idea from Heather to document it right from the beginning.

Evan & Holly - Maternity Shoot
Nikon F5 – AF Nikkor 50mm 1:1.4D – Kodak Tri-X 400 @ ASA-250 – SPUR HRX (1+17) 11:00 @ 20C

Evan & Holly - Maternity Shoot
Nikon F5 – AF Nikkor 50mm 1:1.4D – Kodak Tri-X 400 @ ASA-250 – SPUR HRX (1+17) 11:00 @ 20C

The great part was that once I got rolling with the photos it went really well, both Evan and Holly were great subjects, and the process moved along well. I found myself looking only once at a few saved images on Pinterest and then settled into my usual groove when shooting portraits. The only thing different was making sure to show off the baby bump! And no, I’m not getting into newborn photography, but I think I’d be okay doing another maternity shoot of the same style.

CCR Review 17 – Konica Autoreflex T4

I’m not often one for an underdog but this camera happened to draw me in when I first saw it and handled a T3 that my buddy James had gotten and this camera with a lens was just the right price. And while not probably my most favourite camera I’ve used through this series, the lenses are amazing and a system I’ll probably add to if just for the glass to use on a digital camera.

CCR - Review 17 - Konica Autoreflex T4

The Dirt
Make: Konica
Model: Autoreflex T4
Type: 35mm, Single Lens Reflex
Lens: Interchangable, Konica Bayonet Mount II (AR Mount)
Year Manufactured: 1978

CCR - Review 17 - Konica Autoreflex T4

CCR - Review 17 - Konica Autoreflex T4

The Good
The Hexanon lenses are seriously a sleeper system, butter for focus, and sharp as a tack, I mean really sharp, holy Hannah I was blown away by this glass! While I’m not a fan on the camera, I am a fan of the lenses, and do plan on getting more to adapt and use on my a6000 digital camera. But over all I did enjoy using this camera, well laid out, good meter and fantastic results. Oddly enough the leather cover on the body was nice a smooth and great to handle and makes the camera easy to hold.

CCR - Review 17 - Konica Autoreflex T4

CCR - Review 17 - Konica Autoreflex T4

The Bad
There are a few downsides to this camera. The first is more a personal preference is that you only have a shutter priority for the auto-exposure system. I’m more an aperture priority sort of guy and find having to manipulate the shutter speed a bit annoying. Even in manual mode it goes more to the aperture side of things rather than shutter speed. The second issue is cosmetic, the leather that covers the body with age does shrink a bit so it give the camera a bit of a rough look when it’s used. And finally again there’s the battery issue, I’m surprised to see a camera made so late into the 1970s to still use a mercury based battery, but being mechanical once it’s dead the camera will still function even without a working battery.

CCR - Review 17 - Konica Autoreflex T4

CCR - Review 17 - Konica Autoreflex T4

The Lowdown
If you’re a shutter-priority junkie and love an underdog camera the Autoflex T4 is your camera. If you’re a fan of great optics and focus on movie production and shoot film on the side it’s well worth the investment in the camera if you can find one with a kit of lenses because they are like butter, and bloody sharp. In addition to the 50mm that came with the camera I’ve already picked up the 35mm f/2.8 and eyeing the 135mm lens as well! For students I really won’t point them at this camera, but someone who wants something a little different than the average photographer this is a good choice. I mean I’ve only run into two other photographers who shoot the Konica system, my buddy James and Ryan Skelly.

All Photos shot in lovely downtown Findlay, Ohio
Konica Autoreflex T4 – Konica AR Hexanon 50mm F1.7 – Ilford Delta 100 – Ilfosol 3 (1+9) 5:00 @ 20C

Out of Sight

As you may know the human eye can only see a small part of the full light spectrum in the world. This is known as the visible spectrum, and it is what photography works with…mostly.

Using special films and filters you can actually photograph in the infrared spectrum. I recently came into possesion of several rolls of Infrared film, sadly not the famous Kodak HIE, but two rolls of Konica IR750, a bunch of (highly sought after) Efke IR820, a roll of (sort of infrared) Ilford SFX200, and bought some Rollei Infrared film. So I purchased a nice Kenko R72 filter big enough to screw into my 35mm lens for my Pentax 645, and the 17-55mm and 70-200mm lens for my Nikon D300. I also have a Hoya 89b filter for smaller lenses.

My first test didn’t turn out too well using some very expired Konica IR750 film…but in the February 1st podcast from the FPP I picked up a couple tips for the second roll I have. But it gave the IR effect. Black skies, white greens. I exposed the film at ISO-10 based on Internet reading, but the second roll will be exposed slower, maybe ISO-1 (like Efke films).

Infrared Fail - Jan 2013

Infrared Fail - Jan 2013

Pentax 645 – SMC Pentax A 645 35mm 1:3.5 – Konica IR750 – HC-110 Dil. B 7:00 @ 20C

I also slapped the filter onto my D300 and fired off and got some pretty pleasing results as well, but have to work a bit on my exposure still.

House Hunting - Jan 2013

However it was back on Monday that I got my first real taste of what can be done with Infrared film using a roll of the Rollei IR film. Now for the most part IR film is rated at 400, because adding the filter in front has such a high filter factor you have to pull the film several stops, in this case I exposed the film at ISO-25 (that’s 4 stops). I used my trusty Gossen Luna Pro F to manually meter each scene. The results, well they speak for themselves. I can’t wait to actually print some of these.

2013 Christmas Cards - Roll 3 Finalists

2013 Christmas Cards - Roll 3 Finalists

2013 Christmas Cards - Roll 3 Finalists

Pentax 645 – SMC Pentax A 645 35mm 1:3.5 – Rollei Infrared @ ISO-25 – Rodinal 1+50 12:00 @ 20C

Now I wait for spring and summer to arrive to work more in infrared, I’m also glad I can still get new stock film because I’m rather enjoying this look.

Long Live Film.