I honestly cannot remember where I first saw St. Marys mentioned, but there’s a good chance it was on Pinterest. And it is well worth a trip with a historic downtown that I love with tonnes of historic buildings that stand a lot of railway history. While off my usual beaten track, it was well worth the detail out for a lovely stroll. Sadly I couldn’t stay for too long and missed many interesting sites in the town; I certainly hope to make it back out here for a future “On The Road” video for my YouTube channel. The area where St Marys is todayRead More →

We start this week with high school English. I don’t know about you, but English seemed to love the topic of Shakespeare. Don’t get me wrong. Shakespeare is brilliant but way over analysed by the average high school student, but what does that have to do with photography? One of my first favourite historical downtowns in Ontario. That reason is Stratford, Ontario. I remember one of my first visits to the city in 2009, and it quickly became a spot where I would test out a new camera and clearly shows what a late 19th-Century City in Ontario once looked like. While the Canada CompanyRead More →

Last month when I reviewed the classic 105mm f/2.5 Nikon lens I mentioned that I’m a big fan of the 105mm focal length. And while I could use the classic lens on my modern cameras, the smaller size looks funny on my larger autofocus cameras, namely the Nikon F4, F5, and D300. On my first trip to New York City and a visit to B&H Photo resulted in the purchase of this beauty. And immediately did a photoshoot in Central Park with a friend and her then partner. a new version of the classic lens that has more than a few tricks up its sleeve.Read More →

If there is a single lens within the manual focus Nikon catalogue with iconic status, it is the 105mm f/2.5. National Geographic photographer Steve McCurry used one to capture the stunning portrait of Sharbat Gula that caught the world’s attention. You may know her better as “The Afgan Girl.” It is a highly sought after, near-perfect quality lens that has changed little since its introduction. I got my copy of the lens from a member of my home church who gave me her grandfather’s press photographer kit which included the Nikon F3, a 50/1.4, 28/2.8, 105/2.5, and 135/2.8. I still have almost all those lensesRead More →

When it comes to the buildings in downtown Milton there has been on that is somewhat of a nemesis for me and getting a decent photo of the rather rundown stone structure. The Thompson House, once one on many hotels that populated the Milton. Constructed by Charles H. Thompson in 1847 as the second hotel in the small town of Milton, the original building would be replaced in 1864 and the same crew went onto to build the first town hall in 1865. The three-story stone structure boasted fourteen rooms, four parlours, a dining room and a wine cellar. It quickly became a popular jointRead More →

Unless you live in Milton, you may not realise the rich architectural heritage that my hometown has to offer. Sadly many of our oldest buildings no longer stand and most that do stand date only to the mid-century, that century is the 19th. And I would have many different homes to choose from, but I wanted something new different and never have been in my camera’s viewfinder before. The Lawson House dates to 1893 built by a local merchant. Sadly I cannot find anything about John Lawson or what role he played in the town. But I do like the house, the creeping vines alongRead More →

There are several iconic buildings that sit along Milton’s main street. There’s the old City Hall, the Quality Green sign, the various churches, the Ivy Arms pub. But besides the churches, there has always been one building that drew my eye, the brick post office. While not the original Milton post office, that post office from 1836 is what earned Milton its name as decided by George Brown (who would become the town’s first Mayor). To the best of my knowledge that post office served until the brick one opened, its cornerstone laid in a grand ceremony in the summer of 1914. Located at theRead More →

My high school doesn’t exist anymore. Sure the building still stands, it serves a different purpose now, but the school I attended is no longer there. Everything got shifted to a new building and a new name. To be honest, I don’t miss it, or high school at all. High School was just a means to an end, but that doesn’t mean I didn’t have any high points to my time there. First, I was able to seriously build up my computer skills, both in function and support. Second, my love of history, both in exploring and how I write about it was because ofRead More →

One of my favourite things to do in both new and familiar cities is to simply wander, get lost even. In fact, this tactic has yielded some amazing photos on my previous trips. And while my wife does not share this same affinity to simply ‘get lost’ in a city she does enjoy the wandering parts. As long as we can stop for coffee or pop into some of the stores along the way. But out of all the cities, I’ve visited my favourite to simply wander around in is Chicago. To be more specific, the loop and the museum campus. These two areas areRead More →

Out of all the Doors Open Events run across Ontario my favourite and longest attended is Doors Open Hamilton. The city knows how to do the event right with lots of buildings both public and private buying into the event and specifically allowing and even welcoming photography. My first taste of doors open had been back in 2007 and I pretty much have attended almost all of the Hamilton events missing only a few in the past decade and a bit. Plus being on the weekend closest to my birthday it has also become somewhat of a Birthday Tradition. This year I had an awesomeRead More →