When it comes to basic bare-bones developers, you don’t get any more simple than Kodak D-76. Kodak D-76 is the common factor between professional and student photographers and everyone in between. It’s a staple in most darkrooms, you can develop film and prints with it, and for me, it was the first developer I ever used for both film and prints. And for a while, I had stopped using Kodak D-76 in my processing, but after I started reviewing films, I got back into the stuff. The reason it gives what you expect, a baseline. It also is relatively inexpensive and economical for long termRead More →

Connect to your inner self and welcome the power of the Olympus OM-System. A true gamechanger when it released the Olympus OM system turned the professional market upside down when it was released in the 1970s showing the world that a professional camera system didn’t need to be bulky. Join Bill and John along with special guest co-host Lori Brooks in our season six premiere as they discuss the magical single digit OM cameras, along with 3D printed cameras, and homebrew ECN-2 chemistry. The OM Factor Olympus already had an established name within the camera industry in Japan but had not ventured into the SLRRead More →

When it comes to Kodak’s film catalogue, there are many films in it that we have never seen much of in North America. Among those, the one that confused me the most was ProImage 100. Despite the name, Kodak documents in no way claim that ProImage 100 is a professional film, but then again what makes a professional film? Maybe because it does not come in sheet film format, like Ektar and Portra? That said, I feel ProImage 100 is a great film to shoot in a professional setting, the soft contrast, excellent colour rendition, and slow speed make it a fantastic hybrid of PortraRead More →

If you think this Portra 800 is a new film, then you’d be wrong. There’s used to be a huge range of Portra films, but today there are only three films in the Portra range. Still, Portra 800 is overshadowed by Portra 160 and Portra 400. I mean, I had heard some talk about Portra 800, but always dismissed it as one of the older films and stuck with Portra 400 and pushing it to ASA-800 when I needed that extra boost. And I can honestly say I used to tell people to not bother with the film stock. But after shooting it, I’m gladRead More →

I have a long and strange history with Eastman High Contrast Positive Film II, AKA Eastman 5363. When the Film Photography Project began to hand-roll and resell the strange and specialised motion picture films I started working extensively with it and if you’re a long-time reader of the blog you’ll recognise the film stock from previous entries. I have probably done enough with the film to write a full out film review on the stock, but that would be old news. So, having one more roll in my possession, thanks to Alex Smith, I decided to give it the one-roll treatment, one final time. FilmRead More →

There’s too much confusion; I can’t get no relief… When it comes to photography, there is a lot of information out there, cameras, formats, film types, developer types, processes. There’s a lot, and it’s all rather complicated because some of the information dates back over 100 years. So today I’m going to do a little bit of a breakdown and hopefully clear up some of the confusion I’ve seen online as of late. Plates Before flexible films, there were plates. We’re talking Glass here that is sensitised and used to capture images. These plates did not conform to the standard sizes we’re used to today.Read More →

On today’s episode, John is going to dig into one of his favourites if not rare and annoying cameras in his collection, the Kodak Medalist. A unique camera with a unique place in the history of camera equipment and the American photographic industry. The Medalist grew out of the need for a high-quality camera that was both robust and American built for the US Military. The year was 1939, World War Two had started with the Japanese invasion of mainland China and the Nazi invasion of eastern Europe. And while America remained neutral, war production cut off the source of high-quality cameras from these twoRead More →

When it comes to a winning colour film for the modern film age, look no further than Kodak Portra 400. The stock, a combination of the best of the older VC and NC stocks, the film burst onto the scene as part of the early film resurgence from Kodak. When it comes to fast colour films and money is no object then you want to shoot Portra 400, it’s like the Tri-X of the colour film world, you can push and pull the film all you want, even on the same roll! Which makes it in my mind the perfect film for digital shooters toRead More →

Often overlooked by many photographers in favour of Portra 400, Portra 160 is a different film altogether and one that is not a particular favourite of mine. Part of the early resurgence of film from Kodak that brought us Ektar 100 and Portra 400. Portra 160 is the combination of the two early films Portra 160NC and 160VC. As the name suggests, the film is designed primarily for Portraits and presents a low contrast almost pastel look a clear departure from the vibrant colours you get from Ektar 100. Film Specs Type: Colour Negative, C-41 Process Film Base: Acetate Film Speed: ASA-160, Latitude +/- 2-StopsRead More →

Ektar 100 is one of my favourite colour films, and that’s saying a lot because I don’t shoot a lot of colour film. But when it comes to Ektar 100, it is the first of many ‘new’ colour films to come out of Kodak since I first started shooting film. The name itself, a historical word in the Kodak Dictionary is an acronym for Eastman Kodak TessAR the lenses produced between 1936 and 1962 and I own a 203mm Ektar which I still run on my Crown Graphic. Then it became a line of professional films rated at 25, 100, and 1600 starting in 1989,Read More →