They came on in the same old way, and we defeated them in the same old way. – Field Marshal Sir Arthur Wellesley – June 1815 Being primarily a War of 1812 reenactor the folks I usually face across the field are the American forces, however, in 2015 I had a chance to visit Europe to join with fellow reenactors around the world to face off against the French at the 200th Anniversary of the Battle of Waterloo. It seemed some of the French were coming to visit us in Canada at Old Fort Erie. I’ll admit it was strange seeing the French tri-colour flyingRead More →

As part of the preparation for putting the entire project into book form, I’ve been going around and re-shooting many of the fortifications that were involved in the War of 1812 using large format film (4 inch by 5 inch), simply for practice and the quality it gives. Here are the first group of forts. Completed at the start of the war to protect the dockyard at Prescott a critical point in the movement of supplies between Upper Canada, Lower Canada and Halifax, Fort Wellington was never outright attacked during the war, rather troops from the garrison would only participate in the battles of OgdensburgRead More →

As a reenactor I rarely get the chance to go out and photograph the battle demonstrations that I participate in, and pretty much never get to be out in the middle of the battle with a camera. But when fellow reenactor and friend Phil started to invite me out to his birthday tactical event at Olde Fort Erie, I thought this would be a great chance to be able to get right up close with the guys shooting. So for a couple of rounds of play I shot my trusty F3 and got right up close in the action. Because people like us are allRead More →

If you’ve ever crossed from Canada into the United States through one of the four land crossings in the Niagara Region, or have been shopping in Buffalo, there is an excellent chance that one of those crossings took place at Fort Erie on the Peace Bridge. If you’ve ever wondered how the small town got that name, take a drive just past the Mather Arch along Lakeshore Road, and you’ll find a small squat stone fort standing on a hill above Lake Erie. This is Olde Fort Erie and the source of the town’s eventual name of Fort Erie. The Old Fort is also oneRead More →