Tag Archives: Canon

CCR Review 62 – Canon T90

The Canon T90 is a camera since I first laid eyes on it during the first season of the Classic Camera Revival Podcast, I think it was even at the first recording session we did. While the T-Series of cameras are not well viewed, many of them cheap and looking more like that 1980s VCR look you find with the early Minolta Maxxums, the T90 is the odd-man out in the series. Big thanks to Mike Bitaxi for the loan!

CCR Review 62 - Canon T90

The Dirt

  • Make: Canon
  • Model: T90
  • Type: Single Lens Reflex
  • Format: 135 (35mm), 36×24
  • Len: Interchangeable, Canon FD Mount
  • Year of Manufacture: 1986-1987

CCR Review 62 - Canon T90

CCR Review 62 - Canon T90

The Good
If you’ve read through many of these reviews, and if you’re still around, thank you, but the biggest thing I can be overly critical about is the physical feel of a camera. The T90 is no slouch, while the majority of the T-Series are boxes, the T90 is a sleek killing machine. Boxy angles are replaced with smooth lines, something you would see in a modern SLR. This makes the camera comfortable to handle and use even for an extended period. And despite the added weight from the larger size and the six AA batteries that power it, the camera is well balanced. Speaking of the AA batteries, the camera can be powered no matter where you find yourself. General use is spot on, with automatic film loading that seems to come out of the Quick Load system. Then there is the meter, even in the appalling weather I was shooting the camera in, and rain spotted lens the meter was spot on with the exposure, and that was running it in full auto-exposure. I’m sure the same power would be brought for semi-automatic and manual modes. And finally, you can get one relatively cheap on the used market not to mention a broad range of inexpensive glass in the FD mount.

CCR Review 62 - Canon T90

CCR Review 62 - Canon T90

The Bad
Just don’t forget that we’re talking about a thirty-year-old camera, and the biggest issue that the T90 suffers is the electronic failure. If you’re a shooter of the T90, you have heard of the dreaded EEE error. Of course, that means that you’ll need to either get a repair done on it or simply replace the unit. At least there’s still a camera shop out there that can do a full refurbishment on the camera. Despite how well the camera handles it suffers from the one big issue that I have with all Canon cameras, the lack of a second command dial. Now most later EOS cameras have a second thumb dial on the camera back; the T90 lacks this. I guess I’m just used to that on Nikons, but it does pose an issue when shooting outside of semi and fully automatic exposure modes. And finally the buttons are difficult to understand what they’re for without a manual, it took the help of Mike to figure out how to put the camera in Auto-Exposure and Matrix/Average metering mode.

CCR Review 62 - Canon T90

CCR Review 62 - Canon T90

The Lowdown
The T90 is an odd-duck of a camera, and I’m surprised it was never marketed to the Professional market, like the T-1 to bring a sleeker camera to the market with all new features than keeping the old F-1 line going. I mean the camera itself has your favourite parts of the Nikon F3 and the best parts of the F4, and you have something close to the T90. It’s a camera that is perfect for anyone who has a large selection of FD mount lenses. The trouble is that shortly after the T90 came out, Minolta released the autofocus system with the Maxxum line of cameras and Canon was quick on the take and released the EOS system shortly after the T90 rendering the camera and the entire manual focus line of cameras and lenses obsolete.

All Photos taken in Acton, Ontario, Canada
Canon T90 – Vivitar Auto Wide-Angle f=28mm 1:2.5 – JCH Streetpan 400 @ ASA-400 – Blazinal (1+50) 22:00 @ 20C

CCR Review 59 – Canon FTb

While I have shot only a handful of Canon products during my reviews, they’ve all given positive results in my books. The Canon FTb is not bucking this trend as a solid match needle, mechanical SLR it is certainly a top pick for me as a student camera. Simple in its operation, and yet provides a good solid introduction to 35mm film photography. Special thanks to Bill Smith for loaning out this black beauty!

CCR Review 59 - Canon FTb

The Dirt

  • Make: Canon
  • Model: FTb
  • Type: Single Lens Reflex
  • Format: 135 (35mm), 36×24
  • Len: Interchangeable, Canon FD Mount
  • Year of Manufacture: 1971

CCR Review 59 - Canon FTb

CCR Review 59 - Canon FTb

The Good
The number one thing I love about this camera is the Quick Load function. Often with older cameras it takes a bit of fiddling to get the film loaded up, some cameras are easier than others, and then there’s the Canon Quick Load. It seriously makes it easy like my Nikon F5, lay down the film, close the door, advance fire, advance, fire and you’re ready to rock and roll. Everything else is fairly well laid out and in a normal place. A power switch to save on battery power, a short throw on the film advance and a pleasing weight in hand. And finally, it’s a match needle metering system very similar to my first SLR, the Minolta SRT-102, put the hole over the needle, nice and easy!

CCR Review 59 - Canon FTb

CCR Review 59 - Canon FTb

The Bad
By this point, reader, you will probably realize that there are some cameras that I try hard to find a fault in, and I normally will go for something petty, well the FTb is one such camera. And that fault is, of course, the battery. The camera does need a mercury cell to work, a power source that isn’t exactly easy to find these days. Now there are some alternatives such as an adapter to step down the power out of a current battery or an air-zinc battery. Then again as the FTb is a mechanical camera all the battery powers is the internal meter, so it isn’t that big of a deal.

CCR Review 59 - Canon FTb

The Lowdown
If you don’t want to spend a fortune to get a solid learner camera, then the FTb is certainly for you. With or without a working meter you get the most bang for your buck, and both the camera bodies and lenses are plentiful online and in reputable used camera shops. If I didn’t already have an extensive selection of Nikon cameras and lenses, an FTb would certainly be a welcome addition to my camera bag. So if you don’t like the idea of grabbing a cliche K1000 or FM, then give the FTb another look, it won’t let you down.

All Photos Taken in Guelph, Ontario
Canon FTb – Canon Lens FD 50mm 1:1.8 – ORWO UN54 – Kodak HC-110 Dil. A 7:30 @ 20C

Classic Camera Revival – Episode 13 – Marry your Lenses, Date you Cameras

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Probably one of the best things to actually invest in with your camera kit is lenses, as the title says, marry your lenses, date your cameras. Once you’ve figured out what system you want to shoot with, invest in glass, so on this the first episode of our second season the gang talks about their favourite lenses!

Glass Featured on Today’s Show…

In 35mm…
Canon FD Lens S.S.C. 50mm 1:1.4 – While on the surface this is just another 50mm FD Canon lens which are already a fantastic lens to shoot on all your FD mount cameras what sets this camera about is the SSC or coating which makes it stand out from the rest!

  • Manufacturer: Canon
  • Mount: Canon FD Mount
  • Focal Length: 50mm
  • Aperture Range: f/1.4 – f/16, 8 blades
  • Elements: 7 Elements in 6 Groups

Bike Lock
Canon T90 – Canon FD Lens 50mm 1:1.4 S. S. C. – Rollei Retro 80s @ EI400 – HC-110 Dil. B

Careful Footing
Canon AE-1 – Canon FD Lens 50mm 1:1.4 S. S. C. – Kodak Elitechrome 100

Carl Zeiss Planar 2/45 T* – This won’t be the first planar lens on today’s episode, mostly because this is a super sharp lens, and even through it is made in Japan not German, they certainly didn’t do anything to mess it up! Other than being a general everyday carry lens, Alex loves it for street photography because you can get both wide and close shots without standing out too much.

  • Manufacturer: Kyoceria under License from Carl Zeiss
  • Mount: Contax G-Mount
  • Focal Length: 45mm
  • Aperture Range: f/2 – f/16, x blades
  • Elements: 6 Elements in 4 Groups

Toronto - Dec 30th, 2015
Contax G2 – Carl Zeiss Planar 2/45 T* – Eastman Double-X 5222 @ ASA-200 – Kodak DK-50 (1+1) 6:00 @ 20C

Toronto - December 30th, 2015
Contax G2 – Carl Zeiss Planar 2/45 T* – Svema Foto 100 @ ASA-100 – Ilford Microphen (Stock) 7:30 @ 20C

Helios-44/2 – This odd-ball Soviet lens is one of John’s favourite for portrait work. And has gained a bit of a cult following!

  • Manufacturer: KMZ, MMZ, Jupiter
  • Mount: Multiple, Commonly M39, M42, K-Mount
  • Focal Length: 58mm
  • Aperture Range: f/2 – f/16 or f/22, x blades
  • Elements: 6 Elements in 4 Groups

Shooting film
Zenit 3M – Helios 44/2 58mm/f2 – Kodak Tri-X 400 – Pyrocat HD (1+1+100) 16:00

Adriana film 2
Spotmatic SP – Helios 44/2 58mm f/2 – Kodak Tri-X 400 @ ASA-100 – Kodak TMax Developer (1+9) 8:30

Voigtlander Super Wide-Heliar Aspherical II 15mm f/4.5

  • Manufacturer: Voigtlander
  • Mount: Leica Thread Mount (LTM, M39) or Leica M-Mount
  • Focal Length: 15mm
  • Aperture Range: f/4.5 – f/22, 10 blades
  • Elements: 8 Elements in 6 Groups

Old Cold Car
Voigtlander Bessa R – Voigtlander Super Wide-Heliar Aspherical 15mm f/4.5 – Rollei RPX 25 film

College Library in Ann Arbour
Voigtlander Bessa R – Voigtlander Super Wide-Heliar Aspherical 15mm f/4.5 – Kodak Tri-X 400 – Xtol (1+1) 9:00

Olympus F.Zuiko Auto-S 50mm 1:1.8 – This lens is the key lens to anyone starting their own OM kit, lightweight and legendary optics and looks great at any aperture.

  • Manufacturer: Olympus
  • Mount: OM
  • Focal Length: 50mm
  • Aperture Range: f/1.8 – f/16
  • Elements: 6 Elements in 5 Groups

2 great people

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In Medium…
Carl Zeiss Planar 80mm 1:2.8 – This super sharp and legendary medium format lens is one that Alex has used several times, first on his Rolleiflex and now on the Hasselblad 500c.

  • Manufacturer: Carl Zeiss
  • Mount: Multiple
  • Focal Length: 80mm
  • Aperture Range: f/2.8 – f/22, x blades
  • Elements: 6 Elements in 4 Groups

TFSM Fall '15  - The Distillery District
Rolleiflex 2.8F – Carl Zeiss Planar 80mm 1:2.8 – Rollei RPX 400 @ ASA-320 – Pyrocat-HD (1+1+100) 18:00 @ 20C

Off the Deep End
Hasselblad 500c – Carl Zeiss Planar 80mm 1:2.8 – Kodak Tri-X 400 @ ASA-200 – Pyrocat-HD (1+1+100) 10:00 @ 20C

Bronica Zenzanon 150mm 1:4 – This incredible sharp at any aperture portrait lens for the SQ line of cameras plus it makes for a great longer lens for more detailed landscape work as well!

  • Manufacturer: Bronica
  • Mount: SQ Bayonet
  • Focal Length: 150mm
  • Aperture Range: f/4 – f/22, x blades
  • Elements: 6 Elements in 5 Groups

Into The Depths of Dementia
Zenza Bronica SQ-Ai – Zenzanon-PS 150mm 1:4 – Kodak Tri-X 400 – Kodak TMax Developer (1+9) 10:30 @ 20C

Portrait of an Urban Photographer
Zenza Bronica SQ-Ai – Zenzanon-PS 150mm 1:4 – Kodak Tri-X 400 – Kodak TMax Developer (1+9) 10:30 @ 20C

Schneider-Kreuznach Xenotar 75mm 1:3.5

  • Manufacturer: Schneider-Kreuznach
  • Mount: Multiple
  • Focal Length: 75mm
  • Aperture Range: f/3.5 – f/16, x blades
  • Elements: 5 Elements in 4 Groups

Banff
Rolleiflex 3.5E3 – Schneider-Kreuznach Xenotar 75mm 1:3.5 – Ilford Pan F+

Outside of Edinburgh Castle
Rolleiflex 3.5E3 – Schneider-Kreuznach Xenotar 75mm 1:3.5 – Kodak Tri-X 400 – Kodak TMax Developer (1+4) 6:00

Nikkor-H 1:3.5 f=50mm – This is the wide angle lens you want if you’re running a Bronica-EC, great for groups or landscape shots with little distortion and super easy to focus!

  • Manufacturer: Nikon
  • Mount: Bronica Bayonet
  • Focal Length: 50mm
  • Aperture Range: f/3.5 – f/22
  • Elements: 6 Elements in 3 Groups

BronicaECVerichrome2015-10-14-0001scan
Bronica EC – Nikkor-H 1:3.5 f=50mm – Kodak Verichrome Pan

BronicaECVerichrome2015-10-14-0010scan
Bronica EC – Nikkor-H 1:3.5 f=50mm – Kodak Verichrome Pan

In Large…
Carl Zeiss Jena Tessar f:4.5 105mm – It’s amazing that this lens is actually off a medium format 6×9 camera but it has just enough coverage for 4×5 but only if you leave any sort of movements alone.

  • Manufacturer: Carl Zeiss
  • Mount: No. 1
  • Focal Length: 105mm
  • Aperture Range: f/4.5 – f/32
  • Elements: 4 Elements in 3 Groups

Ghostly Sitting
Calumet CC400 – Carl Zeiss Jena Tessar 105mm ƒ/4.5 – Shanghai GP3 @ ASA-100 – Rodinal 1+100 (Stand Developed)

My Son in The Sun
Calumet CC400 – Carl Zeiss Jena Tessar 105mm ƒ/4.5 – Shanghai GP3 @ ASA-100 – Rodinal 1+100 & HC-110 1+200 combo (Semi-Stand)

Schneider-Kreuznach Symmar-S 1:5.6/210 – Alex’s go-to lens for shooting 4×5 this wonderful short telephoto is great for portraits and even some landscape work when you don’t need ‘the big picture’

  • Manufacturer: Schneider-Kreuznach
  • Mount: No. 1
  • Focal Length: 210mm
  • Aperture Range: f/5.6 – f/64, x blades
  • Elements: 6 Elements in 4 Groups

A MiG
Intrepid – Schneider-Kreuznach Symmar-S 1:5.6/210 – Adox CHS 100 II – Blazinal (1+25) 5:00 @ 20C

The Stone Bridge (From Below)
Pacemaker Crown Graphic – Schneider-Kreuznach Symmar-S 1:5.6/210 – Ilford HP5+ @ ASA-200 – Pyrocat-HD (1+1+100) 9:00 @ 20C

Looking for a good spot to get your gear and material fix…check out Burlington Camera, Downtown Camera, Film Plus, Belle Arte Camera and Camtech, if you’re in the GTA region of Ontario, if you’re on the West Coast (British Columbia) check out Beau Photo Supply. Additionally you can order online at Argentix (Quebec), the Film Photography Project or Freestyle Photographic.

Also you can connect with us through email: classiccamerarevivial[at]gmail[dot]com or by Facebook, we’re at Classic Camera Revival or even Twitter @ccamerarevival

CCR Review 13 – Canon F-1

The F-1 was Canon’s response to the Nikon F line and the direct competitor to the Nikon F2. The first in a long line of trusted professional SLR system cameras the F-1 is a rugged mechanical beast that today is fairly forgotten with many prefering to work with modern EOS cameras for lens compatablities. While a camera I don’t take out that much because I prefer to work with Nikon systems. The F-1 is a solid mechanical camera that would, if not for the price tag, be a good learner camera.

CCR - Review 13 - Canon F-1
The F-1 certainly cuts a nice figure

The Dirt
Maker: Canon
Model: F-1
Type: 35mm Single Lens Reflex
Lens: Interchangeable, Canon FD Mount
Year of Manufacture: 1971-1984

CCR - Review 13 - Canon F-1

CCR - Review 13 - Canon F-1

The Good
If you ever wanted the thrill of shooting a professional camera, the F-1 certainly would fit the bill infact because it’s all mechanical it makes for a great camera to learn the art of 35mm photography. You can easily find one for 100$ or less and you have a huge library of lenses that can also be had for cheap because Canon no longer uses the FD mount (unlike Nikon and Pentax that both still use the same mount as they did early on). And being a system camera if some parts bugger up, you don’t have to go out and pick up a whole new camera just replace the part that failed and carry on.

CCR - Review 13 - Canon F-1

CCR - Review 13 - Canon F-1

The Bad
These uses the old style mercury cell so you will need to either adapt a modern battery or simply work with an external meter or sunny-16 rule to use the camera. Like many professional cameras finding one in perfect shape is hard, but they do take a beating and keep going, but you may want to invest in a clean/lube/adjust before taking it out in the field. My camera currently suffers from a spacing issue on the film advance, but as I rarely take it out, I haven’t bothered to have it looked at.

CCR - Review 13 - Canon F-1

CCR - Review 13 - Canon F-1

The Low Down
If you’re just getting started in 35mm photography and have some familiarity with Canon the F-1 is a sure bet, just know you cannot use your EOS lenses with the camera. In fact my good friend Julie Douglas learned the art of photography on an F-1 and still uses it to this day. But if you want to step away from one of the T-series cameras or want a back up for your AE-1 Program, the F-1 will certainly be a welcome addition.

All Photos shot at the St. Jacobs’ Market in St. Jacobs Ontario.
Canon F-1 – Canon FD Lens 28mm 1:2.8 – Ilford FP4+ @ ASA-125 – Ilford Ilfosol 3 (1+14) 7:30 @ 20C

CCR Review 4 – Canon AE-1 Program

To start it off, let me just say that I’m a Nikon guy and have very little experience with Canon gear. That being said, I’m rather a big fan of this camera after shooting it. It gives any photographer a very pleasing experience. Easy to handle and easy to use. And while it does require a battery, it makes for a great student camera with full automatic mode and manual settings.

CCR - Review 4 - Canon AE-1 Program
The Canon AE-1 Program with an older Breach-Lock 50mm f/1.4 lens that I got with a Canon F-1

The Dirt
Maker: Canon
Model: AE-1 Program
Type: 35mm Single Lens Reflex
Lens: Interchangeable, Canon FD Mount
Year of Manufacture: 1981

CCR - Review 4 - Canon AE-1 Program

CCR - Review 4 - Canon AE-1 Program

The Good
As I mentioned before this is a very good camera to handle. The program mode makes it super easy to get into film photography without needing a really expensive modern kit. And then there’s the lenses, Canon FD lenses are plentiful and cheap on the used market since the FD mount was abandoned and not easily adaptable to their current EF (EF-S) mount. And despite being mostly Nikon in my film cameras the AE-1 Program was super easy to get started and understanding. Just have to remember everything is opposite from my Nikon kit.

CCR - Review 4 - Canon AE-1 Program

CCR - Review 4 - Canon AE-1 Program

The Bad
The battery, it’s a strange size and I had to actually have a fellow photography and friend give me a battery before I could get the thing working. And the battery housing is fairly weak in my view, being mostly plastic and can easily break.

CCR - Review 4 - Canon AE-1 Program

CCR - Review 4 - Canon AE-1 Program

The Low Down
If you don’t want to go full manual and still want to get a great experience out of a manual camera then the AE-1 Program is the one for you, and bang for your buck you really can’t go wrong with the AE-1 Program. The camera makes for the perfect student camera as well in my books, while not as fully mechanical as say a Nikon FM or Pentax K1000 it certainly is a great starter camera for those wanting to get into film photography. It’s a long running favourite of FPP Leader Michael Raso. And while this camera has since been moved out of the collection to a friend who needed a replacement FD mount body, it certainly will get an A+ from me!

All photos shot in Lowville Park (Lowville, Ontario) and the Mattamy National Cycling Centre (Milton, Ontario)
Canon AE-1 Program – Canon FD Lens 50mm 1:1.4 – Ilford Delta 400
Ilford DD-X (1+4) 8:00 @ 20C