Tag Archives: nikon

Classic Camera Revival – Episode 27 – Return of the Samurai

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The Nikkormat line was a series of SLRs released by Nikon through the 1960s to 70s that were aimed at the consumer market. While there were some electronic Nikkormat cameras the ones we have on the table today are the mechanical ones of the FT line. These are great cameras that you can have for a cheap price and still using all your Non-AI, AI, and AI-S lenses. AI and AI-S providing they still have the claw, unless you have the FT3.

Cameras Featured on Today’s Episode

Nikon Nikkormat FTn – An improved version of the original Nikkormat FT and the oldest one we have on the table. The meter coupling pin on the camera still had to be aligned with the meter coupling shoe on the lens, but the lens maximum aperture no longer had to be manually preset on the FTn. It also improved the lens mounting technique that you could rock the aperture back and forth so that the claw would catch on the pin.

Classic Camera Revival - Episode 27 - Return of the Samurai

  • Make: Nikon
  • Model: Nikkormat FTn
  • Type: Single Lens Reflex
  • Format: 35mm, 36x24mm
  • Lens: Interchangable, Nikon F
  • Year of Manufacture: 1967-1975

Dead Mill
Nikon Nikkormat FTn – Nikkor-H 50mm 1:2 – ORWO UN54+ @ ASA-100 – Kodak Xtol (1+1) 8:00 @ 20C

Scan-130425-0002
Nikon Nikkormat FTn – Nikkor-H 28mm 1:3.5 – ORWO UN54+ @ ASA-100 – Kodak Xtol (1+1) 8:00 @ 20C

Now Entering Leslieville.
Nikon Nikkormat FTn – Nikkor-O 35mm 1:2 – Kodak Tri-X 400 @ ASA-400 – Kodak HC-110 Dil. B 5:00 @ 20C

Nikon Nikkormat FT2 – Released as an answer to customer suggestions for improvement of the FTn. The FT2 would have a silver-oxide battery and a fixed hot shoe to mount and external flash. The FT2 also has a +/- in the match needle metering readout.

Classic Camera Revival - Episode 27 - Return of the Samurai

  • Make: Nikon
  • Model: Nikkormat FT2
  • Type: Single Lens Reflex
  • Format: 35mm, 36x24mm
  • Lens: Interchangable, Nikon F
  • Year of Manufacture: 1975-1977

Cherry Blossoms
Nikkormat FT2 – Tamrom 17mm ƒ/3,5 – Fujichrome Velvia 50

Caffenol-C 2 Bath Test
Nikkormat FT2 – Nikon Nikkor 50mm 1:1.8 – Polypan F @ ASA-50 – Caffenol-C 2 Bath 5+5

Firewood (Nikon Version)
Nikkormat FT2 – Nikon Nikkor 50mm 1:1.8 – Polypan F @ ASA-50 – Ilford ID-11 (1+1) 9:00 @ 20C

Nikon Nikkormat FT3 – Released as more of a stop-gap measure, the FT3 is a rare model of Nikkormat that can mount AI-S without needing the claw/pin interface. They were short lived as Nikon released the FM/FE line in 1977 a few months after the FT3 hit shelves.

CCR Review 46 - Nikon Nikkormat FT3

  • Make: Nikon
  • Model: Nikkormat FT3
  • Type: Single Lens Reflex
  • Format: 35mm, 36x24mm
  • Lens: Interchangable, Nikon F
  • Year of Manufacture: 1977

CCR Review 46 - Nikon Nikkormat FT3
Nikon Nikkormat FT3 – AI-S Nikkor 50mm 1:1.4 – Ilford FP4+ @ ASA-100 – Kodak D-23 (Stock) 6:00 @ 20C

CCR Review 46 - Nikon Nikkormat FT3
Nikon Nikkormat FT3 – AI-S Nikkor 50mm 1:1.4 – Ilford FP4+ @ ASA-100 – Kodak D-23 (Stock) 6:00 @ 20C

CCR Review 46 - Nikon Nikkormat FT3
Nikon Nikkormat FT3 – AI-S Nikkor 50mm 1:1.4 – Ilford FP4+ @ ASA-100 – Kodak D-23 (Stock) 6:00 @ 20C

Looking for a good spot to get your gear and material fix…check out Burlington Camera, Downtown Camera, Film Plus, Belle Arte Camera and Camtech, if you’re in the GTA region of Ontario. In Guelph there’s Pond’s FotoSource For those further north you can visit Foto Art Camera in Owen Sound. On the West Coast (British Columbia) check out Beau Photo Supply. Additionally you can order online at Argentix (Quebec), the Film Photography Project or Freestyle Photographic.

Also you can connect with us through email: classiccamerarevivial[at]gmail[dot]com or by Facebook, we’re at Classic Camera Revival or even Twitter @ccamerarevival

An Extra Special Gift

This was certainly a first for me. I’ve been doing the photography thing for many years, and while my favourite subjects are things that really can’t move around, I do find myself enjoying the few portrait and wedding gigs that I come across. But when it came to shooting maternity it was all new territory. And it can be a pretty creepy one also. You look at places like Pinterest, and you can get carried away by semi-nude women showing off their pregnant bodies. Now before you lay on the hate, I’m not saying that’s a bad thing or wrong. I just don’t like that style of shooting, and when my subjects are my soon-to-be brother & sister-in-law. That’s just not the direction I want to take.

Evan & Holly - Maternity Shoot
Sony a6000 + Konica Hexanon 1:2.8 f=35mm

Evan & Holly - Maternity Shoot
Sony a6000 + Konica Hexanon 1:2.8 f=35mm

The idea is Heather’s who came up with the idea to do a shoot with them once we found out they were expecting, and it became all the more special when the one baby was two. Yep, instant niece and nephew added in, and just before my wedding. It did take Holly a bit of time to warm up to the idea of having maternity photos done. And I can understand that she also does photography, and it’s difficult for a photographer to stand in front of the camera rather than behind.

Evan & Holly - Maternity Shoot
Sony a6000 + KMZ Helios 44-2 2/58

Evan & Holly - Maternity Shoot
Nikon F5 – AF Nikkor 50mm 1:1.4D – Kodak Tri-X 400 @ ASA-250 – SPUR HRX (1+17) 11:00 @ 20C

Thankfully we had just the right weather to be outside, well it was a little cold for Evan and Holly, I at least could keep my coat on. And for the backdrop, we took advantage of being in Hamilton the city of waterfalls and worked at Tiffany and Sherman Falls. What makes this whole thing extra special is that Evan and Holly had been waiting a long time to start a family, so it was an amazing idea from Heather to document it right from the beginning.

Evan & Holly - Maternity Shoot
Nikon F5 – AF Nikkor 50mm 1:1.4D – Kodak Tri-X 400 @ ASA-250 – SPUR HRX (1+17) 11:00 @ 20C

Evan & Holly - Maternity Shoot
Nikon F5 – AF Nikkor 50mm 1:1.4D – Kodak Tri-X 400 @ ASA-250 – SPUR HRX (1+17) 11:00 @ 20C

The great part was that once I got rolling with the photos it went really well, both Evan and Holly were great subjects, and the process moved along well. I found myself looking only once at a few saved images on Pinterest and then settled into my usual groove when shooting portraits. The only thing different was making sure to show off the baby bump! And no, I’m not getting into newborn photography, but I think I’d be okay doing another maternity shoot of the same style.

Classic Camera Revival – Episode 21 – The Great Nikon Show

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It’s the great Nikon show, specifically talking about the Nikon F line of cameras and to narrow it down even more, the highly prized single digit F line, or Nikon’s professional line of cameras! Since we’re all about pre-2000 we’re leaving out the F6 (which isn’t really marketed as a professional camera) and focusing on the F, F2, F3, F4, and F5 cameras! On air for this episode is John Meadows, Alex Luyckx, and guest co-host Bill Smith!

All in the (F)amily
All in the F(amily)!

Cameras Featured on Today’s Show…

Nikon F – The one that started it all! The Nikon F was the camera that introduced the world to the professional SLR system camera, where the user could customize the camera to any configuration that they need to get the shot. It also cut its professional teeth in the damp jungles of Vietnam.

The Dirt:

  • Make: Nikon
  • Model: F
  • Type: Single Lens Reflex
  • Format: 35mm, 35x24mm
  • Lens: Interchangable, F-Mount
  • Year of Manufacture: 1959-1974

CCR - Review 28 - Nikon F Photomic FTn

Vintage Jag
Nikon F – Nikkor-S Auto 1:1.4 f=50mm – Ilford Delta 100

Columns
Nikon F – AI-S Nikkor 105mm 1:2.5 – Kodak Tri-X 400 – Kodak Xtol (1+1)

CCR - Review 28 - Nikon F Photomic FTn
Nikon F – AI-S Nikkor 105mm 1:2.5 – Ilford FP4+ @ ASA-125 – Kodak DK-50 (1+1) 5:00 @ 20C

Nikon F2 – The beauty that really carried on the tradition of the Nikon F but did so with style. It will also take you through the end of days and get fantastic photos as a result. Even today this is still a great camera to get your hands on, especially the later model units that would even have working meters still.

The Dirt:

  • Make: Nikon
  • Model: F2
  • Type: Single Lens Reflex
  • Format: 35mm, 35x24mm
  • Lens: Interchangable, F-Mount
  • Year of Manufacture: 1971-1980

Classic Camera Revival - Episode 15 - Mechanical Madness

Scan-141003-0014
Nikon F2a – AI-S Nikkor 200mm 1:4 – Kodak Ektar 100

Smile :D
Nikon F2 Photomic – AI-S Nikkor 50mm 1:1.4 – Holga 400 @ ASA-400 – Kodak Xtol (1+1) 9:30 @ 20C

Urban Desolation
Nikon F2 – Nikkor-N Auto 1:2.8 f=28mm – Rollei Retro 80s – Kodak D-23 (1+1) 13:00

Nikon F3 – The F3 was a radical departure for Nikon moving to an electronic semi-automatic (aperture priority) camera. While many photographers resisted this move, as the camera would not operate at all shutter speeds if it didn’t have battery power, it soon because one of the longest produced Nikon camera reaching all the way to the year 2000, outlasting both it’s successors in the F4 and F5.

The Dirt:

  • Make: Nikon
  • Model: F3
  • Type: Single Lens Reflex
  • Format: 35mm, 35x24mm
  • Lens: Interchangable, F-Mount
  • Year of Manufacture: 1980-2000

CCR - Review 24 - Nikon F3

Base of the Bloor Street Viaduct
Nikon F3 – AI-S Nikkor 28mm 1:2.8 – Adox CMS 20 II @ ASA-20 – Diafine 3+3

CCR - Review 24 - Nikon F3
Nikon F3 – AI-S Nikkor 50mm 1:1.4 – Ilford FP4+ @ ASA-125 – Ilford Microphen (1+1) 10:00 @ 20C

Lindsay 1
Nikon F3 – AI-S Nikkor 105mm 1:2.5 – Ilford Delta 400 – Kodak TMax Developer (1+9)

Nikon F4 – When it comes to camera meters, you really cannot beat the F4. This beast of a camera was the first Nikon professional camera to sport an autofocus system and a matrix metering system. The metering system was based on the earlier Nikon FA and even today Nikon digital cameras meters are based on the F4’s.

The Dirt:

  • Make: Nikon
  • Model: F4
  • Type: Single Lens Reflex
  • Format: 35mm, 35x24mm
  • Lens: Interchangable, F-Mount
  • Year of Manufacture: 1988-1997

CCR - Review 1 - Nikon F4

Svema Micrat-Orto - Test Roll 2 - Fifty Point Conservation Area
Nikon F4 – PC Nikkor 35mm 1:2.8 – Svema Micrat-Orto (FPP Super Postive Slide Film) @ ASA-0.75 – Kodak Xtol (1+1) 14:00 @ 20C

Man by the Beach: Colour version
Nikon F4 – Nikon Series E 75-150mm 1:3.5- Svema Colour 125

Plattsburg, New York - Eastman 5363
Nikon F4 – AF Nikkor 35mm 1:2D – Eastman 5363 @ ASA-25 – PMK Pyro (1+2+100) 11:00 @ 20C

Nikon F5 – The penultimate Nikon Professional SLR. The F5 was the final 35mm professional SLR and became the base for the D1, the first professional Digital SLR released by Nikon. It’s Alex’s personal favourite when it comes to Autofocus SLRs and is his choice with the AF DC-Nikkor 105mm 1:2D for street photography.

The Dirt:

  • Make: Nikon
  • Model: F5
  • Type: Single Lens Reflex
  • Format: 35mm, 35x24mm
  • Lens: Interchangable, F-Mount
  • Year of Manufacture: 1996-2004

CCR - Review 22 - Nikon F5

Gettysburg - Spring 2016
Nikon F5 – AF Nikkor 50mm 1:1.4D – Kodak Vision3 250D @ ASA-250 – Unicolor Rapid C-41 Kit

TFSM Winter '16 - Muddy York
Nikon F5 – AF DC-Nikkor 105mm 1:2D – Kodak Tri-X 400 @ ASA-200 – Pyrocat-HD (1+1+100) 10:00 @ 20C

Astrolab
Nikon F5 – AF DC-Nikkor 105mm 1:2D – Ilford Delta 100 @ ASA-100 – FA-1027 (1+14) 9:00 @ 20C

If you’re wondering why we didn’t include the F6, well it’s because none of us own one so we really can’t speak to it also it was not really aimed at the professional market as by the time the F6 was released the pros had gone digital and the F6 was aimed at the advanced amateurs with deep pockets.

Looking for a good spot to get your gear and material fix…check out Burlington Camera, Downtown Camera, Film Plus, Belle Arte Camera and Camtech, if you’re in the GTA region of Ontario. For those further north you can visit Foto Art Camera in Owen Sound. On the West Coast (British Columbia) check out Beau Photo Supply. Additionally you can order online at Argentix (Quebec), the Film Photography Project or Freestyle Photographic.

Also you can connect with us through email: classiccamerarevivial[at]gmail[dot]com or by Facebook, we’re at Classic Camera Revival or even Twitter @ccamerarevival

CCR Review 46 – Nikon Nikkormat FT3

To be perfectly honest, I’m a sucker for mechanical match needle SLRs. They’re simple, elegant and great to learn on and even now still a joy to shoot. The FT3 is just that, an easy to use, fun camera that can if needed double as a self-defense weapon. The sad part is that the FT3 only was made for a few months before being superseded by the Nikon FM. A unique creature among the more consumer oriented Nikkormat lines the FT3 can use AI and AI-S lenses even if they don’t have the coupling claw. Sadly you won’t be able to use the Non-AI glass that many Nikkormat shooters love.

CCR Review 46 - Nikon Nikkormat FT3

The Dirt
Make: Nikon
Model: Nikkormat FT3
Type: Single Lens Reflex
Format: 35mm, 24×35
Lens: Interchangeable, Nikon F Mount (AI)
Year of Manufacture: 1977-1979

CCR Review 46 - Nikon Nikkormat FT3

CCR Review 46 - Nikon Nikkormat FT3

The Good
The FT3 is a strong camera, hands down. The best part about it is that it can take AI/AI-S lenses, unlike previous Nikkormat models. Which means you have a solid lineup of glass available to you as well as inexpensive Nikon Series E which you shouldn’t dismiss out of hand. And while this is a slightly more modern camera it feels like one made in the 1950s or 1960s, but it still feels great in the hand. And as an added touch, I like the round film counter window adds a nice retro look to it. Combine the look, feel, and weight with a short throw on the film advance you have a comfortable camera to use. The FT3 is also built like a brick so you can easily take it into almost any situation and it will come out on top. And finally, there’s battery power, while not needed (thankfully) it takes a normal silver oxide cell, so you don’t have to worry about keeping the meter running.

CCR Review 46 - Nikon Nikkormat FT3

CCR Review 46 - Nikon Nikkormat FT3

The Bad
Sadly the FT3 will not accept the Non-AI lenses; the coupling pin is missing from the camera body. While not a big issue for me as I have all AI/AI-S glass, it could be for someone who is using it to replace an older Nikkormat body. There are a few usability issues that I have with the camera that could be just because of age and my unfamiliarity with them. The first is the shutter speed control. The shutter speed dial is located on the lens mount, and while there is a nice handle, it is still not visible in the viewfinder which makes it a little difficult to operate the camera. Additionally, the slider for setting the film speed is a bit awkward to use as it is connected to a locking section of the shutter control handle. And last is a jumpy meter which could mean the camera just needs a good Clean, Lube, Adjust, but I have gotten good at catching a right meter reading before it jumps around. But since the FT3 is mechanical I can always fall back on Sunny-16.

CCR Review 46 - Nikon Nikkormat FT3

CCR Review 46 - Nikon Nikkormat FT3

The Lowdown
The FT3 is the perfect camera if you want a solid mechanical camera that won’t break the bank, and already have a collection of AI/AI-S glass. And even though they don’t say ‘Nikon’ on the front doesn’t mean they don’t have the same quality. And if the older Nikkormats are just as good as the FT3 the whole series of cameras gets my blessing. Just watch out and get one that can use the lenses you have on the model as older Nikkormats require you to have the coupling claws present on the lens.

Photos taken in Toronto, Ontario
Nikon Nikkormat FT3 – AI-S Nikkor 50mm 1:1.4 – Ilford FP4+ @ ASA-100 – Kodak D-23 (Stock) 6:00 @ 20C

CCR Review 44 – Nikon AF240SV

If you grew up in the 1980s and 1990s, you’d first recognize the sound this camera makes when it takes a photo. It’s a total nostalgia fest from those long family vacations, holiday snaps, and trips to the amusement park. And you would be right; the Nikon AF240SV is a mom camera, designed to be as simple as possible the modern version of the ever present Kodak Camera from the 19th century. You press the button; it does the rest. While my family never used Nikon, we were mostly Minolta; it still was a trip back in time for me to use such a camera again.

CCR Review 44 - Nikon AF240SV

The Dirt
Make: Nikon
Model: AF240SV
Type: Point and Shoot
Format: 35mm, 24×35
Lens: Fixed, Nikon Lens 28mm 1:5.6
Year of Manufacture: 1980

CCR Review 44 - Nikon AF240SV

CCR Review 44 - Nikon AF240SV

The Good
So the one thing that blew me away about this camera is the lens. You would not think that some basic ‘mom’ camera would have a decent lens on it. But I was impressed with the quality of images that came out of this camera. Plus it’s a nice wide 28mm lens so you can get the whole family in the picture and the silly mascot. Next up is the battery power, now many cameras of a similar vintage would have some weird, camera-store particular battery that you would have to shell out twenty some odd bucks to buy. Not the AF240SV, it takes two AA batteries. So you could be at the theme park and be able to pick up spare batteries at the gift shop (and still may have to shell out a twenty for).

CCR Review 44 - Nikon AF240SV

CCR Review 44 - Nikon AF240SV

The Bad
Don’t expect to be doing anything advanced with this camera. Everything, everything is automatic. Focus, Loading, Rewind, Flash, Exposure. But sometimes simple is what you’re looking for then this is your camera. Probably the thing that is most annoying about this camera is that it’s a box, so it doesn’t hold well in the hand for a long period, and because of that, you can find that you’ll see some of your fingers in the image. So in reality, it’s just like it was when mom or dad was taking photos on family vacation. And finally, this camera gives little in the way of feedback, other than to tell you that your flash is charged and ready.

CCR Review 44 - Nikon AF240SV

CCR Review 44 - Nikon AF240SV

The Lowdown
Alright, so you have to remember I’m a user of fairly advanced cameras, so there has been a fair amount of snark in this review. But in all honestly, this is a pretty decent camera in the point-and-shoot field. I may go as far as to say this would make for an elegant camera to do street photography. You just have to point and shoot; the camera will do the rest for you! Plus you could even classify this as a toy camera even.

Photos Taken at Photostock 2016, Birchwood Inn, Harbor Springs, Michigan
Nikon AF240SV – Nikon Lens 28mm 1:5.6 – Kodak TMax 400 @ ASA-400 – Kodak HC-110 Dil. B 5:3- @ 20C

CCR Review 41 – Nikon F90

True to form, while the professionals were shooting the F4, many of those advanced semi-pro photographers were clamoring for something a little better than the entry level auto-focus SLRs. Nikon gave them the F90, in a system that Nikon keeps pretty much to this day. And what a camera the F90 turned out to be! This is a fast, accurate, and surprisingly quiet semi-professional camera that doesn’t feel like a cheap system despite the price they command on the used market (You can get a decent body for under 50$!). But don’t let the price scare you because you’re getting a whole lotta camera without dinging your wallet too much!

CCR Review 41 - Nikon F90

The Dirt
Make: Nikon
Model: F90
Type: Single Lens Reflex
Format: 35mm, 24×35
Lens: Interchangeable, Nikon F-Mount
Year of Manufacture: 1992-2001

CCR Review 41 - Nikon F90

CCR Review 41 - Nikon F90

The Good
This is one of those cameras that you really can’t say anything bad about it, or you want to wax poetic about it, so I’ll try and restrain myself. First off this camera is comfortable to handle and light weight without feeling overly cheap and plasticky either. It also packs the same matrix metering system that the Nikon F4 has inside it, which is one of my favourite meters next to the one in the F5. Next off the camera works great with both auto and manual focus lenses and AF is certainly a step up from the system in the F4 and is quick on the older D-Type lenses and the focus assist is nice and easy on manual focus lenses. As for ease of use, this is probably one of the easiest menu based cameras to operate because everything is laid out pretty clearly on the camera body and with a nice command dial even working in manual mode is nice because the aperture control is on the lens!

CCR Review 41 - Nikon F90

CCR Review 41 - Nikon F90

The Bad
While not really a bad thing over all, this camera doesn’t support the modern Nikon G-Type autofocus lenses completely. They will attach and auto focus but you can only run the camera in full program and shutter priority mode. While not a total loss, it does limit you in what you can do. And as someone who shoots mainly in aperture priority or manual, it means I can’t use my lovely 14-24mm f/2.8G lens completely with this camera. Another issue is that the F90 cannot support the vertical release that is found on the optional battery grip only the F90x/N90s can. But overall neither of these are real deal breakers on the camera, only minor annoyances.

CCR Review 41 - Nikon F90

CCR Review 41 - Nikon F90

The Lowdown
It isn’t like I need another strong autofocus Nikon SLR, I have the F5 and it is a nice piece of equipment, but it’s heavy. The F90 is the best of both worlds, it gives me a fast, accurate camera in a light weight package. Since I do most of my street shooting with the 105mm and an autofocus SLR the F90 gives me a smaller lighter camera to work with. Plus at the price point you can get these cameras at you can afford to have one in your collection! And if you already have the lenses you’re in luck!

All photos taken in Chicago, Illinois
Nikon F90 – AF Nikkor 35mm 1:2D – Rollei Retro 80s @ ASA-80 – Blazinal (1+25) 6:00 @ 20C

Classic Camera Revival – Episode 16 – Let’s All Shoot One Camera

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So what happens when a whole group of photographers sit down and share a single camera? Well we get a nice little picture of what each of us enjoys about cameras in general! So today the whole group sits down to talk on the Nikon FA and John sits down with David Nardi from E6it!

Camera Featured on Today’s Show…

Nikon FA – This was the first Nikon camera to feature a full lineup of auto-exposure modes, from full Program, Aperture and Shutter Priority and of course Full Manual. The power behind this is a set of stored exposures a computer will pattern match from it’s library of samples and come up with the correct shutter speed and aperture.

Classic Camera Revival - Episode 16 - Let's All Shoot One Camera

Make: Nikon
Model: FA
Type: Single Lens Reflex
Format: Miniature Format (35mm), 24x35mm
Lens: Interchangeable, Nikon F Mount
Year of Manufacture: 1983

What John had to say… I have to admit this camera has been sitting in a box for awhile, neglected in favour of my F2 and F4, but when I took it out the week before to make sure it worked it felt comfortable in my hands right away. The build quality is topnotch; one gets the sense the camera will not let you down. Properly cared for, I get the sense this camera could be shooting for decades to come. Why pay $$$$ for a Df, when you can get the same experience for a lot less coin with this classic?

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What Mike had to say… When it comes to simple to use 35mm SLRs, this one really can’t be beat.  It’s lightweight, compact and well designed. The finder on it is very big (92% coverage) and bright and lets you frame an image very easily. Manually focusing with this camera (it’s not Autofocus after all) is really simple with the bright screen.  Granted, we were using a very good fast lens, but lets face it, some viewfinders, even with a fast lens, are just plain… DIM. Now let’s go into a bit of ‘how’ I feel about the camera in general. It is well designed. It is well engineered. In fact, it is so good, it won’t let you take a bad exposure.  Almost as if the camera is saying “Look, you think you know what you’re doing here, but I promise you won’t like it. SO I fixed it for you.” I almost had too much fun shooting this camera. The shutter has a nice solid sound to it and the film advance lever has a nice short throw. I must admit to a serious downside to this camera though. You see, when it comes to shooting film I like to take my time. This camera just made it feel like a hassle to take your time. It wanted you to shoot shoot shoot shoot SHOOT! That may not sound like a downside at all, but it didn’t fee like it should be dangling around your neck but in your hand instead. Perhaps that’s how Nikon engineers wanted it. Not as a neck ornament but as a memory creator. Photography is, after all, taking a moment in time and freezing it forever. Creating a memory that will bring back a story. So for me, ultimately, that is the very definition of what Photography should be all about.  So do I recommend this camera? Absolutely. If you want a camera that is simple to use and will bring a smile to your face shooting? This is definitely one of those cameras you should have in your hand.

ccr-mike02

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What Donna had to say… This was a wonderful camera to use. I really enjoyed shooting with it.  This camera is light weight and very easy to focus with.  For those of you looking for a 35 mm film I would recommend this camera. It’s design is unique and it is well built.  It is great for people just starting out or even just to try for fun or to add to your collection.

ccr-donna02

ccr-donna01

What Alex had to say… Having used the Nikon line of cameras extensively Alex felt right at home and really enjoyed using the camera, minus the little plastic grip. He certainly would use the camera again and may just add one into his collection despite needing another Nikon 35mm SLR like he needs another hole in the head.

ccr-alex02

ccr-alex01

Special Guest Interview – David Nardi – David Nardi is the man behind the return of E-6 processing to the city of Toronto, John took some time (read several hours) to sit down and discuss processing and photography as a whole! If you want to learn more about his services and use them yourself you have head over to: www.e6it.ca Co-Host Mike has used E6it in the past, I highly recommend using David Nardi. His work is absolutely brilliant!  He treats every single roll of film as his own.  He uses fresh chemistry each time and loves film!

And don’t forget, our Classic Camera Revival GAS meet is only a week away! If you haven’t emailed us or RSVP’d on our Facebook event please do so. And we’re looking forward to seeing everyone who can make it there!

Looking for a good spot to get your gear and material fix…check out Burlington Camera, Downtown Camera, Film Plus, Belle Arte Camera and Camtech, if you’re in the GTA region of Ontario, if you’re on the West Coast (British Columbia) check out Beau Photo Supply. Additionally you can order online at Argentix (Quebec), the Film Photography Project or Freestyle Photographic.

Also you can connect with us through email: classiccamerarevivial[at]gmail[dot]com or by Facebook, we’re at Classic Camera Revival or even Twitter @ccamerarevival

Real People are More Interesting

Paparazzi, Paparazzi…the taunts seemed almost to be sung as I grabbed a shot of two women walking across the street. They don’t bother me, besides I’m far from a paparazzi photographer, these two women are not famous nor am I going to be selling these photos. Besides I can barely hear the voices over the History Extra Podcast about Richard I and the Third Crusade.

TFSM Winter '16 - Real People are More Interesting

TFSM Winter '16 - Real People are More Interesting

Having just come from a beautiful photowalk in the High Park Area I had some time to kill before meeting up with my buddy James at Trinity-Bellwood Park to head up to the Dakota Tavern to catch the Silver Hearts playing live so I popped down to Downtown Camera and picked up another roll of film to load up and do some street photography as I walked along Queen Street.

TFSM Winter '16 - Real People are More Interesting

TFSM Winter '16 - Real People are More Interesting

I don’t practice Street Photography that often, I have to feel in the right mood, the camera I have has to sit right and the film has to suit the light. The film I ended up grabbing was Rollei Retro 400s a film I hadn’t ever used but my gut was telling me this would be a good film to use in the slowly dying light of downtown Toronto.

TFSM Winter '16 - Real People are More Interesting

TFSM Winter '16 - Real People are More Interesting

Some of the people whom I caught on film noticed me, well with the gear I was using there really wasn’t any surprise, there’s a reason many street photographers prefer the smaller silent cameras to the bulk of a professional SLR. I flashed a quick smile which was returned and then I was gone, carried on west by my quick pace the camera settled back into my arm waiting to be used again.

TFSM Winter '16 - Real People are More Interesting

TFSM Winter '16 - Real People are More Interesting

And it just goes to show…that in the long run, I’ll leave the stars to the paparazzi, for me, real people are more interesting.

Nikon F5 – AF DC-Nikkor 105mm 1:2D – Rollei Retro 400s
Kodak TMax Developer (1+4) 9:30 @ 20C
Epson V700
Adobe Photoshop CC (2015)

Classic Camera Revival – Episode 13 – Marry your Lenses, Date you Cameras

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Probably one of the best things to actually invest in with your camera kit is lenses, as the title says, marry your lenses, date your cameras. Once you’ve figured out what system you want to shoot with, invest in glass, so on this the first episode of our second season the gang talks about their favourite lenses!

Glass Featured on Today’s Show…

In 35mm…
Canon FD Lens S.S.C. 50mm 1:1.4 – While on the surface this is just another 50mm FD Canon lens which are already a fantastic lens to shoot on all your FD mount cameras what sets this camera about is the SSC or coating which makes it stand out from the rest!

  • Manufacturer: Canon
  • Mount: Canon FD Mount
  • Focal Length: 50mm
  • Aperture Range: f/1.4 – f/16, 8 blades
  • Elements: 7 Elements in 6 Groups

Bike Lock
Canon T90 – Canon FD Lens 50mm 1:1.4 S. S. C. – Rollei Retro 80s @ EI400 – HC-110 Dil. B

Careful Footing
Canon AE-1 – Canon FD Lens 50mm 1:1.4 S. S. C. – Kodak Elitechrome 100

Carl Zeiss Planar 2/45 T* – This won’t be the first planar lens on today’s episode, mostly because this is a super sharp lens, and even through it is made in Japan not German, they certainly didn’t do anything to mess it up! Other than being a general everyday carry lens, Alex loves it for street photography because you can get both wide and close shots without standing out too much.

  • Manufacturer: Kyoceria under License from Carl Zeiss
  • Mount: Contax G-Mount
  • Focal Length: 45mm
  • Aperture Range: f/2 – f/16, x blades
  • Elements: 6 Elements in 4 Groups

Toronto - Dec 30th, 2015
Contax G2 – Carl Zeiss Planar 2/45 T* – Eastman Double-X 5222 @ ASA-200 – Kodak DK-50 (1+1) 6:00 @ 20C

Toronto - December 30th, 2015
Contax G2 – Carl Zeiss Planar 2/45 T* – Svema Foto 100 @ ASA-100 – Ilford Microphen (Stock) 7:30 @ 20C

Helios-44/2 – This odd-ball Soviet lens is one of John’s favourite for portrait work. And has gained a bit of a cult following!

  • Manufacturer: KMZ, MMZ, Jupiter
  • Mount: Multiple, Commonly M39, M42, K-Mount
  • Focal Length: 58mm
  • Aperture Range: f/2 – f/16 or f/22, x blades
  • Elements: 6 Elements in 4 Groups

Shooting film
Zenit 3M – Helios 44/2 58mm/f2 – Kodak Tri-X 400 – Pyrocat HD (1+1+100) 16:00

Adriana film 2
Spotmatic SP – Helios 44/2 58mm f/2 – Kodak Tri-X 400 @ ASA-100 – Kodak TMax Developer (1+9) 8:30

Voigtlander Super Wide-Heliar Aspherical II 15mm f/4.5

  • Manufacturer: Voigtlander
  • Mount: Leica Thread Mount (LTM, M39) or Leica M-Mount
  • Focal Length: 15mm
  • Aperture Range: f/4.5 – f/22, 10 blades
  • Elements: 8 Elements in 6 Groups

Old Cold Car
Voigtlander Bessa R – Voigtlander Super Wide-Heliar Aspherical 15mm f/4.5 – Rollei RPX 25 film

College Library in Ann Arbour
Voigtlander Bessa R – Voigtlander Super Wide-Heliar Aspherical 15mm f/4.5 – Kodak Tri-X 400 – Xtol (1+1) 9:00

Olympus F.Zuiko Auto-S 50mm 1:1.8 – This lens is the key lens to anyone starting their own OM kit, lightweight and legendary optics and looks great at any aperture.

  • Manufacturer: Olympus
  • Mount: OM
  • Focal Length: 50mm
  • Aperture Range: f/1.8 – f/16
  • Elements: 6 Elements in 5 Groups

2 great people

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In Medium…
Carl Zeiss Planar 80mm 1:2.8 – This super sharp and legendary medium format lens is one that Alex has used several times, first on his Rolleiflex and now on the Hasselblad 500c.

  • Manufacturer: Carl Zeiss
  • Mount: Multiple
  • Focal Length: 80mm
  • Aperture Range: f/2.8 – f/22, x blades
  • Elements: 6 Elements in 4 Groups

TFSM Fall '15  - The Distillery District
Rolleiflex 2.8F – Carl Zeiss Planar 80mm 1:2.8 – Rollei RPX 400 @ ASA-320 – Pyrocat-HD (1+1+100) 18:00 @ 20C

Off the Deep End
Hasselblad 500c – Carl Zeiss Planar 80mm 1:2.8 – Kodak Tri-X 400 @ ASA-200 – Pyrocat-HD (1+1+100) 10:00 @ 20C

Bronica Zenzanon 150mm 1:4 – This incredible sharp at any aperture portrait lens for the SQ line of cameras plus it makes for a great longer lens for more detailed landscape work as well!

  • Manufacturer: Bronica
  • Mount: SQ Bayonet
  • Focal Length: 150mm
  • Aperture Range: f/4 – f/22, x blades
  • Elements: 6 Elements in 5 Groups

Into The Depths of Dementia
Zenza Bronica SQ-Ai – Zenzanon-PS 150mm 1:4 – Kodak Tri-X 400 – Kodak TMax Developer (1+9) 10:30 @ 20C

Portrait of an Urban Photographer
Zenza Bronica SQ-Ai – Zenzanon-PS 150mm 1:4 – Kodak Tri-X 400 – Kodak TMax Developer (1+9) 10:30 @ 20C

Schneider-Kreuznach Xenotar 75mm 1:3.5

  • Manufacturer: Schneider-Kreuznach
  • Mount: Multiple
  • Focal Length: 75mm
  • Aperture Range: f/3.5 – f/16, x blades
  • Elements: 5 Elements in 4 Groups

Banff
Rolleiflex 3.5E3 – Schneider-Kreuznach Xenotar 75mm 1:3.5 – Ilford Pan F+

Outside of Edinburgh Castle
Rolleiflex 3.5E3 – Schneider-Kreuznach Xenotar 75mm 1:3.5 – Kodak Tri-X 400 – Kodak TMax Developer (1+4) 6:00

Nikkor-H 1:3.5 f=50mm – This is the wide angle lens you want if you’re running a Bronica-EC, great for groups or landscape shots with little distortion and super easy to focus!

  • Manufacturer: Nikon
  • Mount: Bronica Bayonet
  • Focal Length: 50mm
  • Aperture Range: f/3.5 – f/22
  • Elements: 6 Elements in 3 Groups

BronicaECVerichrome2015-10-14-0001scan
Bronica EC – Nikkor-H 1:3.5 f=50mm – Kodak Verichrome Pan

BronicaECVerichrome2015-10-14-0010scan
Bronica EC – Nikkor-H 1:3.5 f=50mm – Kodak Verichrome Pan

In Large…
Carl Zeiss Jena Tessar f:4.5 105mm – It’s amazing that this lens is actually off a medium format 6×9 camera but it has just enough coverage for 4×5 but only if you leave any sort of movements alone.

  • Manufacturer: Carl Zeiss
  • Mount: No. 1
  • Focal Length: 105mm
  • Aperture Range: f/4.5 – f/32
  • Elements: 4 Elements in 3 Groups

Ghostly Sitting
Calumet CC400 – Carl Zeiss Jena Tessar 105mm ƒ/4.5 – Shanghai GP3 @ ASA-100 – Rodinal 1+100 (Stand Developed)

My Son in The Sun
Calumet CC400 – Carl Zeiss Jena Tessar 105mm ƒ/4.5 – Shanghai GP3 @ ASA-100 – Rodinal 1+100 & HC-110 1+200 combo (Semi-Stand)

Schneider-Kreuznach Symmar-S 1:5.6/210 – Alex’s go-to lens for shooting 4×5 this wonderful short telephoto is great for portraits and even some landscape work when you don’t need ‘the big picture’

  • Manufacturer: Schneider-Kreuznach
  • Mount: No. 1
  • Focal Length: 210mm
  • Aperture Range: f/5.6 – f/64, x blades
  • Elements: 6 Elements in 4 Groups

A MiG
Intrepid – Schneider-Kreuznach Symmar-S 1:5.6/210 – Adox CHS 100 II – Blazinal (1+25) 5:00 @ 20C

The Stone Bridge (From Below)
Pacemaker Crown Graphic – Schneider-Kreuznach Symmar-S 1:5.6/210 – Ilford HP5+ @ ASA-200 – Pyrocat-HD (1+1+100) 9:00 @ 20C

Looking for a good spot to get your gear and material fix…check out Burlington Camera, Downtown Camera, Film Plus, Belle Arte Camera and Camtech, if you’re in the GTA region of Ontario, if you’re on the West Coast (British Columbia) check out Beau Photo Supply. Additionally you can order online at Argentix (Quebec), the Film Photography Project or Freestyle Photographic.

Also you can connect with us through email: classiccamerarevivial[at]gmail[dot]com or by Facebook, we’re at Classic Camera Revival or even Twitter @ccamerarevival

CCR Review 28 – Nikon F

The one that started it all. The ultimate ansestor of all Nikon single lens reflex cameras, the mighty F. This big clunky beast grew out of post-occupation Japan and introduced the professional 35mm System camera. This is an endlessly modifiable camera (hence system) with drives, winders, prisms, and magazines to turn it into exactly what you needed in a camera. From the streets to the jungles, the Nikon F was the professional camera of the 1960s. The particular model in this review is the Nikon F Photomic FTn.

CCR - Review 28 - Nikon F Photomic FTn

The Dirt
Make: Nikon
Model: F (Featured in this review the F Photomic FTn)
Type: Single Lens Reflex
Format: 35mm, 35x24mm
Lens: Interchangable, F-Mount
Year of Manufacture: 1959

CCR - Review 28 - Nikon F Photomic FTn

CCR - Review 28 - Nikon F Photomic FTn

The Good
This is a beast of a camera. Seriously you could use it as a personal defense weapon then return to your photography without missing a beat. I mean these are the cameras that survived the hell of the Vietnam War, so what we can put them through pales. But despite the size and weight it’s a surprisingly easy camera to operate, with a short film advance throw and and really satisfying shutter sound and mirror slap. You know you’ve fired off this camera. As I mentioned before this is a system camera so once you have the base body, you can turn the camera into whatever you want. This means that you can remove a non-working Photomic prism and replace it with a plain non-metered prism, if you can find/afford one. Plus I really can’t complain about image quality because you have access to all Non-AI, AI, and AI-S lenses which are all really sharp and plentiful on the used market.

CCR - Review 28 - Nikon F Photomic FTn

CCR - Review 28 - Nikon F Photomic FTn

The Bad
Probably the number one bad thing about this camera is age and wear. The newest cameras you can find from this line are late 1960s and being a professional camera most have been rather beat up. And while many are still working the real question is for how long and could they be fixed. So if you got one use it! And even if the meter doesn’t work at least the camera still will. The second thing isn’t really a bad thing just really weird is the film loading, you remove the entire back of the camera, which makes it next to impossible to single hand load the camera, and requires a bit of juggling.

CCR - Review 28 - Nikon F Photomic FTn

CCR - Review 28 - Nikon F Photomic FTn

The Lowdown
Despite everything the Nikon F is a solid camera and if you got one, shoot it, you won’t be disappointed. And if you have the hankering for the grand-daddy of all Nikon SLRs or just want to complete your collection of Nikon pro bodies, then a Nikon F is certainly a solid camera. Another good application for getting one if you want to put a good authentic touch to your Vietnam War photographer historical reenactment impression or the finishing touches on your sweet Full Metal Jacket or Apocalypse Now costume. You smell that? That’s fixer son, I love the smell of fixer in the morning.

All photos taken in Toronto, Ontario
Nikon F – AI-S Nikkor 105mm 1:2.5 – Ilford FP4+ @ ASA-125 – Kodak DK-50 (1+1) 6:00 @ 20C